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does anyone have any pictures of monomorium/molesta exposed nests?

monomorium solenopsis molesta exposed exposed nest nest photos request

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10 replies to this topic

#1 Offline Chickalo - Posted January 15 2021 - 10:46 AM

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i don't think i need to explain much more


シグナチャーです。예.

 


#2 Offline Scherme - Posted January 15 2021 - 10:49 AM

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which angle? light level? filter? time of day? big or small nests? what exposure? geographic location?

please explain more 

 

edit: no i don't have any pictures of monomorium/molesta


Edited by Scherme, January 15 2021 - 10:50 AM.

Tetramorium immigrans | Journal

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#3 Offline Chickalo - Posted January 15 2021 - 10:52 AM

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which angle? light level? filter? time of day? big or small nests? what exposure? geographic location?

please explain more 

 

edit: no i don't have any pictures of monomorium/molesta

from above, the other don't matter too much, i just need a general idea of the "pattern"/look they tend to make their nests


シグナチャーです。예.

 


#4 Offline TennesseeAnts - Posted January 15 2021 - 11:28 AM

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Monomorium have pretty conspicuous nests, but S. molesta tend to be primarily subterranean.

#5 Offline NickAnter - Posted January 15 2021 - 11:31 AM

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I have seen thief ants make small mounds. They actually look quite similar to founding chambers. If it is not especially warm, I have even seen workers foraging above-ground. I am not sure this applies to Eastern species, as the common species in SoCal is not really identified properly.


Edited by NickAnter, January 15 2021 - 11:31 AM.

Hi there! I went on a 6 month or so hiatus, in part due, and in part cause of the death of my colonies. 

However, I went back to the Sierras, and restarted my collection, which is now as follows:

Aphaenogaster uinta, Camponotus vicinus, Camponotus modoc, Formica cf. aserva, Formica cf. micropthalma, Formica cf. manni, Formica subpolita, Formica cf. subaenescens, Lasius americanus, Manica invidia, Pogonomyrmex salinus, Pogonomyrmex sp. 1, Solenopsis validiuscula, & Solenopsis sp. 3 (new Sierra variant). 


#6 Offline Ferox_Formicae - Posted January 15 2021 - 11:37 AM

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Any particular species of Monomorium? I don't have any images of Monomorium nests that I know of, but I do know that anytime I've ever found M. minimum there's really no rhyme or reason to the nest. They're just kind of spread out everywhere. I find them under or inside rotting logs (usually very dry ones), under bark, in hollow twigs, and under rocks. I've seen floricola nesting in a hollow Sea Grape stick about 7 feet up.

 

As for Solenopsis molesta, I don't have any photos of a nest of the species, but I do have nest photos of related species, which I'll put below (I'll also put the species' names as well).

 

original.jpg?1560599992

Solenopsis pergandei (FL)

 

original.jpg?1561658468

Solenopsis molesta-group sp. (SC)

 

original.jpg?1563484848

Solenopsis molesta-group sp. (VA)


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#7 Offline Ferox_Formicae - Posted January 15 2021 - 11:40 AM

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I have seen thief ants make small mounds. They actually look quite similar to founding chambers. If it is not especially warm, I have even seen workers foraging above-ground. I am not sure this applies to Eastern species, as the common species in SoCal is not really identified properly.

In the east, workers do occasionally forage aboveground, and one species in the S. fugax-group, S. pergandei, does form mounds just before nuptial flights.


Currently Keeping:

 

Camponotus chromaiodes, Camponotus nearcticus, Stigmatomma pallipesStrumigenys brevisetosaStrumigenys clypeataStrumigenys louisianaeStrumigenys membraniferaStrumigenys reflexaStrumigenys rostrata

 

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#8 Offline UtahAnts - Posted January 15 2021 - 12:18 PM

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All the monomorium nests I have seen have large brood chambers for pupae, eggs, and larvae, with small tunnels connecting and multiple nest entrances.


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#9 Offline ANTdrew - Posted January 15 2021 - 12:54 PM

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I’m fairly certain there is a Monomorium nest cast in Tschinkel’s paper on nest structure.
Here is a drawing as well: https://www.antwiki....inimum_nest.jpg

Edited by ANTdrew, January 15 2021 - 12:57 PM.

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#10 Offline Syber_ant - Posted February 10 2021 - 9:44 AM

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Any particular species of Monomorium? I don't have any images of Monomorium nests that I know of, but I do know that anytime I've ever found M. minimum there's really no rhyme or reason to the nest. They're just kind of spread out everywhere. I find them under or inside rotting logs (usually very dry ones), under bark, in hollow twigs, and under rocks. I've seen floricola nesting in a hollow Sea Grape stick about 7 feet up.

 

As for Solenopsis molesta, I don't have any photos of a nest of the species, but I do have nest photos of related species, which I'll put below (I'll also put the species' names as well).

 

original.jpg?1560599992

Solenopsis pergandei (FL)

 

original.jpg?1561658468

Solenopsis molesta-group sp. (SC)

 

original.jpg?1563484848

Solenopsis molesta-group sp. (VA)

that's Pog



#11 Offline Antkeeper014 - Posted August 1 2021 - 5:15 PM

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Most monomorium will make extremely small mounds, similar in shape to what you would see with lasius, albeit on a far smaller, flatter scale.

 

Now I only have inner nest composition experience with M. viridium, but I'll share nonetheless. 0.5-2 inches directly below the mound(s) will be a very large chamber containing all the pupae and final install larvae, occasionally with larger colonies you may see a queen or two in this shallow chamber, but it's rather uncommon. A little bit further below (1-4 inches) there will be a series of small, interconnected chambers containing all the queens and younger brood stages. Colonies of monomorium make extremely shallow nests, often less than 6 inches.

Solenopsis species up here will remain completely subterranean unless a colony reaches a very large size, in which case they may excavate tiny mounds, roughly the diameter and height of 2 dimes stacked on top of each other. Their nest structures are almost identical to that of monomorium, very shallow and compact.


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