Jump to content

  • Chat
  •  
  •  



Welcome to Formiculture.com!

This is a website for anyone interested in Myrmecology and all aspects of finding, keeping, and studying ants. The site and forum are free to use. Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation points to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!

Photo
- - - - -

Possible wasp queen?

wasp waspqueen

Best Answer LC3 , November 22 2015 - 6:32 PM

i'm guessing it's just a common yellow jacket. You should look at the stripe pattern.

 

Seems like Vespula maculifrons and Vespula pensylvanica are present in Nevada, but with slight stripe variations.

Go to the full post


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 Offline Here for the honeypots - Posted November 22 2015 - 4:42 PM

Here for the honeypots

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 47 posts
Found this guy sleeping in my wood pile alone. Since he was alone I sort of expect it to be a queen. He may appear dead in these pictures but he's quite alive. I put him in the freezer a bit so that I could take pictures without getting stung. Tends to be much calmer and sleepier. Wasp people of formiculture, any help?? Edit: I suppose I shouldn't be referring to it as "he" if I'm unsure haha. My bad

Attached Files


Edited by Here for the honeypots, November 22 2015 - 4:44 PM.


#2 Offline LC3 - Posted November 22 2015 - 6:14 PM

LC3

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,321 posts
  • LocationRichmond, BC, Canada

Freezer? not fridge? It's never a good idea to put insects in the freezer.. I've done it before. :/

Hint: They die. Usually 

 

If she is a queen maybe you can start a colony with her? I've heard it being done before.


Edited by LC3, November 22 2015 - 6:14 PM.


#3 Offline Here for the honeypots - Posted November 22 2015 - 6:21 PM

Here for the honeypots

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 47 posts
Only for about 5 minutes haha. I need some confirmation from someone though

#4 Offline LC3 - Posted November 22 2015 - 6:32 PM   Best Answer

LC3

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,321 posts
  • LocationRichmond, BC, Canada

i'm guessing it's just a common yellow jacket. You should look at the stripe pattern.

 

Seems like Vespula maculifrons and Vespula pensylvanica are present in Nevada, but with slight stripe variations.


Edited by LC3, November 22 2015 - 6:49 PM.

  • T.C. likes this

#5 Offline Here for the honeypots - Posted November 22 2015 - 7:50 PM

Here for the honeypots

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 47 posts
Ok thanks

#6 Offline dermy - Posted November 23 2015 - 12:02 AM

dermy

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,392 posts
  • LocationCanada

I'm guessing either Vespula pensylvanica mainly because of the "Yellow eye ring" and the yellow stripe on the thorax:

 

see this picture for what I'm saying:

http://pubs.extensio...g?itok=iijM2Plh

 

BTW For Picture purposes freezer is okay but no more then a few minutes, for hibernating it needs some kind of "material" to protect it from the cold of a fridge, i wouldn't use dirt just because of pests and stuff.

 

All I gotta say is Vespula are really hard to get started, I don't know anyone who's started a Sucessful Vespula pensylvanica "nest" I do know someone who's done a small nest of Vespula maculifrons but it died shortly after workers, due to too unknown reasons.



#7 Offline Here for the honeypots - Posted November 27 2015 - 9:29 AM

Here for the honeypots

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 47 posts
Hmm, okay thanks. So it was a queen? Or just a worker?

#8 Offline dermy - Posted November 27 2015 - 9:32 AM

dermy

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,392 posts
  • LocationCanada

Hmm, okay thanks. So it was a queen? Or just a worker?

Sorry yes at this time of the year all wasps [unless you live somewhere tropical] will be queens, and the markings also suggest Queen.



#9 Offline Here for the honeypots - Posted December 6 2015 - 10:13 PM

Here for the honeypots

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 47 posts
Ah okay thank you. I released it. Next one won't be so lucky

#10 Offline Canadian anter - Posted July 3 2016 - 11:39 AM

Canadian anter

    Vendor

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,487 posts
  • LocationToronto,Canada

Raising wasps is kinda like big fire ants......that can fly.During the founding stage I've heard they  need A LOT of protein.


Visit us at www.canada-ant-colony.com !





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: wasp, waspqueen

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users