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Texas anting locations?

texas anting fire ants location

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38 replies to this topic

#21 Offline Studio - Posted February 7 2018 - 5:52 PM

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Thanks for the black light idea nurbs! I will definitely have to try it out in the parks nearby. You're also right about the kids, found out both of the sellers were underage. I have to admit though, they have a pretty impressive collection.

 

 

 

I'm going to attempt to blacklight in certain wooded areas. I'll be checking on the ground mostly though, since I'm in love with bigger ants. 

 

 

 

 

I know what you mean, I've been trying to find some Pogonomyrmex or Camponpotus' around my area, but with no luck. I'll definitely have to throw a Texas anters get-together in Austin. If my job allows it I will try to get a weekend off to go there during either July or August after a rain.


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#22 Offline kellakk - Posted February 8 2018 - 10:09 AM

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Thanks for the black light idea nurbs! I will definitely have to try it out in the parks nearby. You're also right about the kids, found out both of the sellers were underage. I have to admit though, they have a pretty impressive collection.

 

 

 

I'm going to attempt to blacklight in certain wooded areas. I'll be checking on the ground mostly though, since I'm in love with bigger ants. 

 

 

 

 

I know what you mean, I've been trying to find some Pogonomyrmex or Camponpotus' around my area, but with no luck. I'll definitely have to throw a Texas anters get-together in Austin. If my job allows it I will try to get a weekend off to go there during either July or August after a rain.

 

Do you have stands of oak anywhere nearby? If you do, I bet there's Camponotus around, since many species nest in oak. A easy way to check for what ant species you have in an area is to set out baits (sugar water, canned tuna or hot dogs, and cookie crumbs).  Put the bait on a notecard so you can easily see which ants come, then check back in an hour or so.  Try to avoid areas that clearly have fire ants.

 

You can find Pogonomyrmex all around, but their mounds aren't as obvious as they are in arid places. I've often found them on the side of roads in fields where the soil is sandy.  I haven't figured out a way to guarantee finding them yet, though.


Current Species:
Pogonomyrmex montanus

 

Reticulitermes hesperus


#23 Offline Ants_Texas - Posted February 8 2018 - 1:39 PM

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Thanks for the black light idea nurbs! I will definitely have to try it out in the parks nearby. You're also right about the kids, found out both of the sellers were underage. I have to admit though, they have a pretty impressive collection.

 

 

 

I'm going to attempt to blacklight in certain wooded areas. I'll be checking on the ground mostly though, since I'm in love with bigger ants. 

 

 

 

 

I know what you mean, I've been trying to find some Pogonomyrmex or Camponpotus' around my area, but with no luck. I'll definitely have to throw a Texas anters get-together in Austin. If my job allows it I will try to get a weekend off to go there during either July or August after a rain.

 

Do you have stands of oak anywhere nearby? If you do, I bet there's Camponotus around, since many species nest in oak. A easy way to check for what ant species you have in an area is to set out baits (sugar water, canned tuna or hot dogs, and cookie crumbs).  Put the bait on a notecard so you can easily see which ants come, then check back in an hour or so.  Try to avoid areas that clearly have fire ants.

 

You can find Pogonomyrmex all around, but their mounds aren't as obvious as they are in arid places. I've often found them on the side of roads in fields where the soil is sandy.  I haven't figured out a way to guarantee finding them yet, though.

 

Elaborating on this idea, after you find a species you like, you could follow the worker back to its nest. Don't let the fire ants get the bait! 



#24 Offline Studio - Posted February 8 2018 - 5:27 PM

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Ok guys I think I hit the jackpot! My friend invited me to go disk golfing in the blistering cold because no one else would be there  :lol: .

The park is 30 minutes North in from where I am and there's a nature preserve right next to it (Lewisville)!

 

While we were disk golfing I noticed multiple circular, pebble formations with a center hole. Definitely harvester ant handiwork, I've seen plenty in California and I know all too well.

There were dead harvester ants piled on with the pebbles. I'm assuming these were workers that didn't make it through hibernation, but I didn't see any live ants what-so-ever. It's still probably too cold for any to come out, heck even RIFA's aren't out yet. 

I'll see if I can collect some specimens for you guys to ID this weekend so I can check when to look for a nuptial flight! I'm pretty excited guys!  :yahoo:

 

Harvesters are by far my favorite species and I've yet to see anything besides RIFA or veeerrryy verrrryy tiny species like S. molesta and Monomorium minimum.


Edited by Studio, February 8 2018 - 5:27 PM.

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#25 Offline Superant33 - Posted February 10 2018 - 1:27 PM

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I think the previous posters hit the nail on the head: you have to get away from developed areas. All of my luck has been in parks or while on vacation. Except for C. sayi. And in my area they will fly soon (first day in February that gets over 80 F). Good luck.

#26 Offline nurbs - Posted February 10 2018 - 1:42 PM

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Ok guys I think I hit the jackpot! My friend invited me to go disk golfing in the blistering cold because no one else would be there  :lol: .

The park is 30 minutes North in from where I am and there's a nature preserve right next to it (Lewisville)!

 

While we were disk golfing I noticed multiple circular, pebble formations with a center hole. Definitely harvester ant handiwork, I've seen plenty in California and I know all too well.

There were dead harvester ants piled on with the pebbles. I'm assuming these were workers that didn't make it through hibernation, but I didn't see any live ants what-so-ever. It's still probably too cold for any to come out, heck even RIFA's aren't out yet. 

I'll see if I can collect some specimens for you guys to ID this weekend so I can check when to look for a nuptial flight! I'm pretty excited guys!  :yahoo:

 

Harvesters are by far my favorite species and I've yet to see anything besides RIFA or veeerrryy verrrryy tiny species like S. molesta and Monomorium minimum.

 

Nice, keep us updated. 


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nurbsants
 
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California Ants for Sale

 

Unidentified Myrmecocystus

https://www.formicul...ls-near-desert/

 

Undescribed "Modoc"

https://www.formicul...mp-ca-5-4-2017/

 

Camponotus or Colobopsis yogi:

https://www.formicul...a-ca-1-28-2018/

 
Camponotus us-ca02
https://www.formicul...onotus-us-ca02/

 

Unidentified Formica

https://www.formicul...l-ca-6-27-2020/

 
Pencil Case and Test Tube Formicariums
https://www.formicul...m-and-outworld/
 
Bloodworm Soup
https://www.formicul...bloodworm-soup/


#27 Offline Jadeninja9 - Posted February 10 2018 - 2:38 PM

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Where I live, near San Fransisco, I have a similar problem with finding queens since the Argentine ants have taken over so much. You have to know where to look, and my parents aren’t going to always drive me 30mins to an isolated mountain everyday. This black light idea seems like it would be good for me. Hey nurbs, do you think this black light would work?

https://www.amazon.c...X236_SY340_QL65

#28 Offline nurbs - Posted February 10 2018 - 3:37 PM

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Where I live, near San Fransisco, I have a similar problem with finding queens since the Argentine ants have taken over so much. You have to know where to look, and my parents aren’t going to always drive me 30mins to an isolated mountain everyday. This black light idea seems like it would be good for me. Hey nurbs, do you think this black light would work?

https://www.amazon.c...X236_SY340_QL65

 

That'll work fine.

 

But if you're a kid and don't even have the funds that or need more permission from the parents, you can even try this. It works. Nurbs has tried :)

 


Instagram:
nurbsants
 
YouTube
 
California Ants for Sale

 

Unidentified Myrmecocystus

https://www.formicul...ls-near-desert/

 

Undescribed "Modoc"

https://www.formicul...mp-ca-5-4-2017/

 

Camponotus or Colobopsis yogi:

https://www.formicul...a-ca-1-28-2018/

 
Camponotus us-ca02
https://www.formicul...onotus-us-ca02/

 

Unidentified Formica

https://www.formicul...l-ca-6-27-2020/

 
Pencil Case and Test Tube Formicariums
https://www.formicul...m-and-outworld/
 
Bloodworm Soup
https://www.formicul...bloodworm-soup/


#29 Offline Toddsnake - Posted February 12 2018 - 5:21 PM

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Great to see some Texans on here!  I'm a 56 year old Newbie to the hobby, looking to get a colony started this spring.  No RIFAs need apply!  Hoping for a Camponotus species. I live in South Dallas, real close to Duncanville.  I live 500 feet from Five Mile Creek with lots of wooded areas that as a child I was ALL OVER, building forts and fishing, and battling a constant case of poison ivy!  Hope to do some queen hunting out there this spring, maybe try the backlight method out there.  I would like to buy an already started test tube queen from last spring if I could, but not had any luck finding anyone in Texas selling them.....

Anyone wants to do some ant hunting with me would be welcome...

 

Todd B)


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#30 Offline Ants_Texas - Posted February 12 2018 - 6:31 PM

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Great to see some Texans on here!  I'm a 56 year old Newbie to the hobby, looking to get a colony started this spring.  No RIFAs need apply!  Hoping for a Camponotus species. I live in South Dallas, real close to Duncanville.  I live 500 feet from Five Mile Creek with lots of wooded areas that as a child I was ALL OVER, building forts and fishing, and battling a constant case of poison ivy!  Hope to do some queen hunting out there this spring, maybe try the backlight method out there.  I would like to buy an already started test tube queen from last spring if I could, but not had any luck finding anyone in Texas selling them.....

Anyone wants to do some ant hunting with me would be welcome...

 

Todd B)

What's up with all of you new guys from Dallas?? Welcome to the greatest ant website ever! :)

 

Not sure if I'd be going to Dallas, but hey you never know. 



#31 Offline Spamdy - Posted February 12 2018 - 7:38 PM

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Great to see some Texans on here!  I'm a 56 year old Newbie to the hobby, looking to get a colony started this spring.  No RIFAs need apply!  Hoping for a Camponotus species. I live in South Dallas, real close to Duncanville.  I live 500 feet from Five Mile Creek with lots of wooded areas that as a child I was ALL OVER, building forts and fishing, and battling a constant case of poison ivy!  Hope to do some queen hunting out there this spring, maybe try the backlight method out there.  I would like to buy an already started test tube queen from last spring if I could, but not had any luck finding anyone in Texas selling them.....

Anyone wants to do some ant hunting with me would be welcome...

 

Todd B)

Welcome to the Forum!

 

 

 

Where I live, near San Fransisco, I have a similar problem with finding queens since the Argentine ants have taken over so much. You have to know where to look, and my parents aren’t going to always drive me 30mins to an isolated mountain everyday. This black light idea seems like it would be good for me. Hey nurbs, do you think this black light would work?

https://www.amazon.c...X236_SY340_QL65

 

That'll work fine.

 

But if you're a kid and don't even have the funds that or need more permission from the parents, you can even try this. It works. Nurbs has tried :)

 

 

Wouldn't that be too dull for blacklighting?  I heard that you need about 40 volts to properly backlight while my setup only has 15 volts. Not sure how to give it power when I'm out backlighting either.


All my colonies are dead. 

 

 Except:

  

  Pogonomyrmex barbatus

  Pheidole obscurithorax

  Pheidole morens


#32 Offline itsHYDRO - Posted February 13 2018 - 10:12 AM

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Hey all, new to the forums, I'm in the Buda/Kyle area, I've had a moderate amount of success with just a blacklight and a large white sheet tacked to the side of my house, I just check it about once an hour in the evenings. I can imagine it's harder in Austin, with it being more urbanized. Anyone have any experience in hot spots in the Austin/Round Rock area? I've seen a few reports of Atta Texana being in northwest Austin, would love some tips if any of y'all have some.

#33 Offline kellakk - Posted February 13 2018 - 12:34 PM

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Hey all, new to the forums, I'm in the Buda/Kyle area, I've had a moderate amount of success with just a blacklight and a large white sheet tacked to the side of my house, I just check it about once an hour in the evenings. I can imagine it's harder in Austin, with it being more urbanized. Anyone have any experience in hot spots in the Austin/Round Rock area? I've seen a few reports of Atta Texana being in northwest Austin, would love some tips if any of y'all have some.

 

Welcome! The Austin area is great for ants, especially along the Colorado River.  There's actually natural areas there rather than all of the RIFA-dominated rangelands that are in much of central Texas.  I checked out Commons Ford Park for birding once and saw many ant species there, including some ponerines (probably Hypoponera).  I also have some field sites near Balcones Canyonlands NWR that are full of CrematogasterCamponotus, and Forelius.  I haven't seen Atta texana in that area, though.  Good luck looking for them! I know that they're in Bastrop SP and McKinney Roughs Park in good numbers if you're willing to drive that far.

 

You can check out research from Brackenridge Field Laboratory to see what ants should be around. You can also ask Alex Wild, who works as the curator of the insect collections there.


Edited by kellakk, February 13 2018 - 12:37 PM.

Current Species:
Pogonomyrmex montanus

 

Reticulitermes hesperus


#34 Offline itsHYDRO - Posted February 13 2018 - 12:46 PM

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Hey all, new to the forums, I'm in the Buda/Kyle area, I've had a moderate amount of success with just a blacklight and a large white sheet tacked to the side of my house, I just check it about once an hour in the evenings. I can imagine it's harder in Austin, with it being more urbanized. Anyone have any experience in hot spots in the Austin/Round Rock area? I've seen a few reports of Atta Texana being in northwest Austin, would love some tips if any of y'all have some.


Welcome! The Austin area is great for ants, especially along the Colorado River. There's actually natural areas there rather than all of the RIFA-dominated rangelands that are in much of central Texas. I checked out Commons Ford Park for birding once and saw many ant species there, including some ponerines (probably Hypoponera). I also have some field sites near Balcones Canyonlands NWR that are full of Crematogaster, Camponotus, and Forelius. I haven't seen Atta texana in that area, though. Good luck looking for them! I know that they're in Bastrop SP and McKinney Roughs Park in good numbers if you're willing to drive that far.

You can check out research from Brackenridge Field Laboratory to see what ants should be around. You can also ask Alex Wild, who works as the curator of the insect collections there.

Thanks so much for all the info! Definitely going to check out those places! :)

#35 Offline nicat23 - Posted February 18 2018 - 5:36 PM

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Fellow texan checking in, located in the Fort Worth area, looking forward to this season! Looking for my first few queens wish me luck, lol


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#36 Offline JohnTX - Posted February 18 2018 - 9:14 PM

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Another semi-newbie checking in.  About a year into both the hobby and being a Texan.  Collecting up north (Frisco) I was able to find: Crematogaster , Pheidole, Brachymyrmex, Monomorium Minimum, and of course RIFA in the last half of the summer.  All pretty small stuff. 

live near a public golf course and on the developing part of town, so not too covered in concrete yet.



#37 Offline Nonamebuticey - Posted June 16 2018 - 10:56 PM

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Did anybody have any luck so far? Also from Dallas and currently looking for queens.

#38 Offline Lexew1899 - Posted June 21 2018 - 7:26 PM

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I found about 18 monomorium queens over the last few days. Also 1 unknown, and two Dorymyrmex sp. In DFW. Finding most around sundown. During the daytime I've only been seeing Solenopsis. A lot taking flight with all the rain.

#39 Offline AntsAreUs - Posted June 21 2018 - 7:51 PM

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If only I still lived in Texas... sigh.







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