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Foranto Nests

foranto wood nests temnothorax crematogaster camponotus wood formicariums

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#1 Offline UtahAnts - Posted April 29 2021 - 6:23 PM

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I'm starting this thread to actively review Foranto nests, and see how they hold up over time. I was not paid or told to promote his products, these results and opinions are all mine. I recently got 3 wood nests from an ant keeper that goes by Foranto. His products are amazingly simple, yet beautiful, and he can make them to order. The only downside would be the shipping price for those who live farther away from Europe, for me it was about $20 for 3 nests. His customer service was great, even with the time difference, and the nests turned out exactly as I wanted them to. So far, I moved 2 colonies in, a Temnothorax and crematogaster colony, and I can't wait to see the nests when they're full. I'll get pictures soon of the colonies, and I'll be sure to update on their condition over time. 

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#2 Offline ANTdrew - Posted April 29 2021 - 6:29 PM

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Very nice. I look forward to following this. My only worry would be Crematogaster chewing out under the glass.
"The ants are a people not strong, yet they prepare their meat in the summer." Prov. 30:25
Keep ordinary ants in extraordinary ways.

#3 Offline JoeByron - Posted April 29 2021 - 6:44 PM

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I thought treated wood was bad for ants?



#4 Offline ANTdrew - Posted April 30 2021 - 2:26 AM

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I thought treated wood was bad for ants?

Depends what it’s treated with. Ants are a lot tougher than we give them credit. The biggest colony in my yard is a huge Crematogaster nest between the pressure treated wood beams of my patio retaining wall.
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"The ants are a people not strong, yet they prepare their meat in the summer." Prov. 30:25
Keep ordinary ants in extraordinary ways.

#5 Offline Kaelwizard - Posted April 30 2021 - 4:58 AM

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I thought treated wood was bad for ants?

Pretty sure whatever he treated it with is non-toxic. Otherwise I doubt he would be selling them.

#6 Offline to_be_announced - Posted July 16 2021 - 8:11 AM

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These nests still doing good? Would love some pictures of the ants in them.


Currently keeping Tetramorium Immigrans and Camponotus Pennsylvanicus in THA mini hearths.  I also have a couple Prenolepis Imparus queens in test tubes.


#7 Offline futurebird - Posted July 16 2021 - 1:51 PM

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I have my camponotus discolor colony in a foranto nest. They love it. I just wish I could find a larger one for when they are ready to move. I have a journal about them in the journal forum with photos. 


Starting this July I'm posting videos of my ants every week on youTube.

I like to make relaxing videos that capture the joy of watching ants.

If that sounds like your kind of thing... follow me >here<


#8 Offline mmcguffi - Posted July 16 2021 - 2:16 PM

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I've asked him a couple of times of different platforms how the nests are hydrated, and I've never gotten a response

 

Are these nests simply not hydrated? ...I guess ants are ok with that?


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#9 Offline Kaelwizard - Posted July 16 2021 - 2:33 PM

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I've asked him a couple of times of different platforms how the nests are hydrated, and I've never gotten a response

Are these nests simply not hydrated? ...I guess ants are ok with that?

You can’t really hydrate wood or it will rot. From my understanding these nests are for ants that don’t require moisture in the nest and only need it provided in the outworld to drink.

#10 Offline futurebird - Posted July 16 2021 - 2:50 PM

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I've asked him a couple of times of different platforms how the nests are hydrated, and I've never gotten a response

 

Are these nests simply not hydrated? ...I guess ants are ok with that?

 

The species I keep is a wood dwelling camponotus that isn't fond of the damp. I keep a test tube of water near the entrance and they have thrived for months. 

When the colony was smaller I put a nest mate directly on the nest. When I removed it they blocked the nest holes with sand. 

 

The wood seems to absorb moisture from their bodies, and with the the openings closed they are happy.

 

I see maybe one or two ants use the water each day. If they were camping on it or putting brood in it I'd question if the nest is too dry. Also I can see their gasters are full of liquid. 

 

A wood nest isn't like plastic, and if it's in an outworld that's isn't super dry there isn't any issue. I was very skeptical of just having ants in a wood nest with no moisture... but as a material it's different... and if the ants live in wood in nature they will be soooo happy. 

 

Here is a link to the journal about the colony it has photos. 

 

https://www.formicul...scolor-journal/


Edited by futurebird, July 16 2021 - 2:53 PM.

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Starting this July I'm posting videos of my ants every week on youTube.

I like to make relaxing videos that capture the joy of watching ants.

If that sounds like your kind of thing... follow me >here<


#11 Offline UtahAnts - Posted July 16 2021 - 4:43 PM

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These nests still doing good? Would love some pictures of the ants in them.

 

The nests are still in good condition, I have yet to move carpenter ants into the largest nest, but they are getting close. I sold the Crematogaster colony, and the Temnothorax chose to stick with their old wood block formicaricarium, although after placing the circular nest into their out world, they started using it as a satellite nest.
 
Attached File  IMG-1111.jpg   286.99KB   0 downloads
 
Attached File  crema foranto.jpg   261.78KB   0 downloads
 
 
This colony was probably a bit large for the small circular nest:
 
Attached File  IMG-0780.jpg   334.86KB   0 downloads

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#12 Offline UtahAnts - Posted July 16 2021 - 4:58 PM

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I've asked him a couple of times of different platforms how the nests are hydrated, and I've never gotten a response

 

Are these nests simply not hydrated? ...I guess ants are ok with that?

 

Most, if not all, wood nests are not hydrated, and like in nature, wood dwelling ants must go outside or into the ground to receive some or all of their moisture. I would definitely recommend providing an external source of water though, usually a water test tube in the outworld or directly attached to the nest. If you really wanted to you can directly hydrate the inside of a wood nest, as long as the water is placed in a area where the ants will have trouble placing their trash and debris on it, mold should not be problem. This works especially well with large colonies, with enough workers to clean and regulate the wood, keeping it mold free. Unless the wood is rotting to begin with, mold has never been a problem, even when I directly hydrate it. Warping the wood is more of a concern than mold for me.


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Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: foranto, wood nests, temnothorax, crematogaster, camponotus, wood formicariums

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