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LowkeyLoaded’s Camponotus Floridanus journal

camponotus floridanus

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#1 Offline LowkeyLoaded - Posted December 18 2020 - 10:56 PM

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Received a colony of 18 workers.

After feeding them and letting them stay in their test tube for a day, I then moved them into a THA mini hearth.
After moving them into a min hearth I went out and bought a macro lens 😏


This video was taken about 10 minutes after I got the colony and fed them. (No macro lens yet)



And here’s a nice shot of the queen! What a beauty, am I right?

Attached Files


Edited by LowkeyLoaded, December 23 2020 - 9:53 PM.

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#2 Offline ZTYguy - Posted December 18 2020 - 11:36 PM

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Where be the video.


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GO CHECK OUT ANTSEMPORIUM HERE: https://antsemporium.com/

#3 Offline TennesseeAnts - Posted December 18 2020 - 11:36 PM

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Where be the video.


Yas. I want da video...
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#4 Offline AntsDakota - Posted December 19 2020 - 7:22 AM

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As do I. Also did you know that C. floridanus is one of the fastest growing Camponotus in the US? In captivity they're reached 1,000 workers in a year before.


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"God made..... all the creatures that move along the ground according to their kinds. (including ants) And God saw that it was good. Genesis 1:25 NIV version


#5 Offline ANTdrew - Posted December 19 2020 - 9:29 AM

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As do I. Also did you know that C. floridanus is one of the fastest growing Camponotus in the US? In captivity they're reached 1,000 workers in a year before.

Sounds like my kind of Camponotus.
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Keep ordinary ants in extraordinary ways.

#6 Offline CheetoLord02 - Posted December 19 2020 - 10:40 AM

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As do I. Also did you know that C. floridanus is one of the fastest growing Camponotus in the US? In captivity they're reached 1,000 workers in a year before.

that's how the entire subgenus Myrmothrix is. My Camponotus atriceps colony is about 4 months old and they have several hundred workers. 1,000 workers in a year is standard for Myrmothrix, and they can easily get more with more aggressive feeding and whatnot.


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#7 Offline LowkeyLoaded - Posted December 23 2020 - 8:53 PM

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Day December 16th 2020

Approximately 20 workers.

 

A nice advantage of my colony settling into their mini hearth, is that now I could power feed them quite easily.

And that is exactly what I intend to do. I want everyone here to see how quickly this species grows and how large the colony can get.

Today I fed them 10 fruit flies. After the feeding I saw a lot of worker - queen trophallaxis. 

Luckily for me this queen likes the spotlight and never has stage fright, so like a true movie star she posed for me while I got this incredible shot of trophallaxis between her and one of her workers. You will also notice that I now have a macro lens for my iPhone.

 

 

 

I also put together a short clip of a quick fruit fly hunt. Enjoy everyone. 

 

 

 

 

Also, check out that brood pile! Can't wait to see this colony take off!

Attached Files


Edited by LowkeyLoaded, December 23 2020 - 8:56 PM.

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#8 Offline LowkeyLoaded - Posted December 24 2020 - 12:20 PM

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Where be the video.


Video posted. One more coming tomorrow.
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#9 Offline CheetoLord02 - Posted December 24 2020 - 12:28 PM

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Going to preface this by saying I don't care if you got these ants from somewhere else, but your profile states you're in Texas. TX does not have C. floridanus, however it does have C. atriceps, the sister species to Floridanus. The populations of C. atriceps in the more northern parts of their range in Texas have a color scheme that is very similar to C. floridanus, and your colony appears to match. I'm just curious if this may be a mis-ID, since it seems likely to me, assuming your colony is from Texas.


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#10 Offline LowkeyLoaded - Posted December 25 2020 - 5:05 PM

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Going to preface this by saying I don't care if you got these ants from somewhere else, but your profile states you're in Texas. TX does not have C. floridanus, however it does have C. atriceps, the sister species to Floridanus. The populations of C. atriceps in the more northern parts of their range in Texas have a color scheme that is very similar to C. floridanus, and your colony appears to match. I'm just curious if this may be a mis-ID, since it seems likely to me, assuming your colony is from Texas.


This colony was collected in Florida. Yes I live in Texas.
After examining them extensively I have concluded they are indeed C. Floridanus, however, corrections are welcome here. If you see something that makes you think otherwise please enlighten me.
I understand your assumption given I live in Texas, and I thank you for your response and interest in my colony.

Cheers
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#11 Offline LowkeyLoaded - Posted December 25 2020 - 10:14 PM

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Day video was taken: December 22nd

Worker count: 21

Today I noticed a new worker in the nest and started filming. 

I have also been feeding them plenty of fruit flies and a few very tiny captive breed hornworms (caterpillars) as well as nectar and honey.

They go nuts over these hornworms, dead or alive. I believe it gives the colony a real boost of protein and it always seems like the brood is well fed after and the queen lays more eggs. I have seen her lay a couple of eggs and I have noticed two small clutches of 6-8 clustered together.

 

Here is a rather long video of my colony. You will see footage of the newly eclosed worker as well as the feeding response brought on by a small hornworm. Enjoy!

 


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#12 Offline CheetoLord02 - Posted December 26 2020 - 10:27 AM

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Going to preface this by saying I don't care if you got these ants from somewhere else, but your profile states you're in Texas. TX does not have C. floridanus, however it does have C. atriceps, the sister species to Floridanus. The populations of C. atriceps in the more northern parts of their range in Texas have a color scheme that is very similar to C. floridanus, and your colony appears to match. I'm just curious if this may be a mis-ID, since it seems likely to me, assuming your colony is from Texas.


This colony was collected in Florida. Yes I live in Texas.
After examining them extensively I have concluded they are indeed C. Floridanus, however, corrections are welcome here. If you see something that makes you think otherwise please enlighten me.
I understand your assumption given I live in Texas, and I thank you for your response and interest in my colony.

Cheers

 

If they're from Florida then they're definitely floridanus. Just curious since I haven't seen anybody keeping the northern C. atriceps variant and I thought it'd be cool to see. Floridanus are still one of the best NA Camponotus, so this colony should be a ton of fun for ya.



#13 Offline LowkeyLoaded - Posted December 26 2020 - 10:59 AM

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Going to preface this by saying I don't care if you got these ants from somewhere else, but your profile states you're in Texas. TX does not have C. floridanus, however it does have C. atriceps, the sister species to Floridanus. The populations of C. atriceps in the more northern parts of their range in Texas have a color scheme that is very similar to C. floridanus, and your colony appears to match. I'm just curious if this may be a mis-ID, since it seems likely to me, assuming your colony is from Texas.

This colony was collected in Florida. Yes I live in Texas.
After examining them extensively I have concluded they are indeed C. Floridanus, however, corrections are welcome here. If you see something that makes you think otherwise please enlighten me.
I understand your assumption given I live in Texas, and I thank you for your response and interest in my colony.

Cheers
If they're from Florida then they're definitely floridanus. Just curious since I haven't seen anybody keeping the northern C. atriceps variant and I thought it'd be cool to see. Floridanus are still one of the best NA Camponotus, so this colony should be a ton of fun for ya.

Yes, they should prove to be quite interesting and entertaining for all of us here. I chose this specific species because of their size and growth rate and I will provide a very dedicated journal on this colony for years to come. (As long as everything goes well for them)
I have THA formicariums of all sizes ready to go for this colony. They have a heat cable touching the corner of their mini hearth which they absolutely love. They definitely like to “cook” their brood next to the heat to speed up their rate of growth.
I am interested in C. atriceps though. How do they compare to Floridanus in terms of worker size and colony growth rate?
Since they are a sister species I would imagine they are similar.

Cheers


Edited by LowkeyLoaded, December 27 2020 - 1:27 PM.


#14 Offline ArmansAnts - Posted December 26 2020 - 11:01 AM

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That colony seems to be doing great, hopefully they grow really fast as usual for them.


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#15 Offline CheetoLord02 - Posted December 26 2020 - 11:39 AM

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Going to preface this by saying I don't care if you got these ants from somewhere else, but your profile states you're in Texas. TX does not have C. floridanus, however it does have C. atriceps, the sister species to Floridanus. The populations of C. atriceps in the more northern parts of their range in Texas have a color scheme that is very similar to C. floridanus, and your colony appears to match. I'm just curious if this may be a mis-ID, since it seems likely to me, assuming your colony is from Texas.

This colony was collected in Florida. Yes I live in Texas.
After examining them extensively I have concluded they are indeed C. Floridanus, however, corrections are welcome here. If you see something that makes you think otherwise please enlighten me.
I understand your assumption given I live in Texas, and I thank you for your response and interest in my colony.

Cheers
If they're from Florida then they're definitely floridanus. Just curious since I haven't seen anybody keeping the northern C. atriceps variant and I thought it'd be cool to see. Floridanus are still one of the best NA Camponotus, so this colony should be a ton of fun for ya.

Yes they should prove to quote a interesting and entertaining for all of us here. I chose this specific species because of their size and growth rate and I will provide a very dedicated journal on this colony for years to come. (As long as everything goes well for them)
I have THA formicariums of all sizes ready to go for this colony. They have a heat cable touching the corner of their mini hearth which they absolutely love. They definitely like to “cook” their brood next to the heat to speed up their rate of growth.
I am interested in C. atriceps though. How do they compare to Floridanus in terms of worker size and colony growth rate?
Since they are a sister species I would imagine they are similar.

Cheers

atriceps and floridanus are extraordinarily similar. floridanus is actually just a population of atriceps that was geographically isolated, and evolved enough to be considered a different species. The one thing I've noticed with my atriceps colony is that they seem to be far less aggressive than floridanus are. The majority have a distinct color difference, but certain atriceps population in Texas have the red/black color scheme of floridanus, and some highland floridanus populations are a more brown color, reminiscent of atriceps. It's all really interesting. I'll probably make a journal on my atriceps once I get home, since they're proving to be pretty interesting.


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#16 Offline LowkeyLoaded - Posted December 26 2020 - 11:57 PM

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Going to preface this by saying I don't care if you got these ants from somewhere else, but your profile states you're in Texas. TX does not have C. floridanus, however it does have C. atriceps, the sister species to Floridanus. The populations of C. atriceps in the more northern parts of their range in Texas have a color scheme that is very similar to C. floridanus, and your colony appears to match. I'm just curious if this may be a mis-ID, since it seems likely to me, assuming your colony is from Texas.

This colony was collected in Florida. Yes I live in Texas.
After examining them extensively I have concluded they are indeed C. Floridanus, however, corrections are welcome here. If you see something that makes you think otherwise please enlighten me.
I understand your assumption given I live in Texas, and I thank you for your response and interest in my colony.

Cheers
If they're from Florida then they're definitely floridanus. Just curious since I haven't seen anybody keeping the northern C. atriceps variant and I thought it'd be cool to see. Floridanus are still one of the best NA Camponotus, so this colony should be a ton of fun for ya.
Yes they should prove to quote a interesting and entertaining for all of us here. I chose this specific species because of their size and growth rate and I will provide a very dedicated journal on this colony for years to come. (As long as everything goes well for them)
I have THA formicariums of all sizes ready to go for this colony. They have a heat cable touching the corner of their mini hearth which they absolutely love. They definitely like to “cook” their brood next to the heat to speed up their rate of growth.
I am interested in C. atriceps though. How do they compare to Floridanus in terms of worker size and colony growth rate?
Since they are a sister species I would imagine they are similar.

Cheers
atriceps and floridanus are extraordinarily similar. floridanus is actually just a population of atriceps that was geographically isolated, and evolved enough to be considered a different species. The one thing I've noticed with my atriceps colony is that they seem to be far less aggressive than floridanus are. The majority have a distinct color difference, but certain atriceps population in Texas have the red/black color scheme of floridanus, and some highland floridanus populations are a more brown color, reminiscent of atriceps. It's all really interesting. I'll probably make a journal on my atriceps once I get home, since they're proving to be pretty interesting.

Thanks for the info!
You should make a journal! I’d love to follow along and compare differences between our two colonies! And yes these guys are already aggressive and they haven’t even broken 25 workers yet. I’m very excited to watch this colony explode. I feed them fruit flies everyday and they aggressively hunt them down. Every ant’s gastor is swollen since they have a constant supply of two types of carbs (sunburst ant nectar and pure organic honey) and a steady stream of fruit flies to keep the brood coming. I really hope I’m over 1,000 workers this time next year. How large is your colony?
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#17 Offline CheetoLord02 - Posted December 27 2020 - 10:09 AM

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I have THA formicariums of all sizes ready to go for this colony. They have a heat cable touching the corner of their mini hearth which they absolutely love. They definitely like to “cook” their brood next to the heat to speed up their rate of growth.
I am interested in C. atriceps though. How do they compare to Floridanus in terms of worker size and colony growth rate?
Since they are a sister species I would imagine they are similar.

Cheers
atriceps and floridanus are extraordinarily similar. floridanus is actually just a population of atriceps that was geographically isolated, and evolved enough to be considered a different species. The one thing I've noticed with my atriceps colony is that they seem to be far less aggressive than floridanus are. The majority have a distinct color difference, but certain atriceps population in Texas have the red/black color scheme of floridanus, and some highland floridanus populations are a more brown color, reminiscent of atriceps. It's all really interesting. I'll probably make a journal on my atriceps once I get home, since they're proving to be pretty interesting.

Thanks for the info!
You should make a journal! I’d love to follow along and compare differences between our two colonies! And yes these guys are already aggressive and they haven’t even broken 25 workers yet. I’m very excited to watch this colony explode. I feed them fruit flies everyday and they aggressively hunt them down. Every ant’s gastor is swollen since they have a constant supply of two types of carbs (sunburst ant nectar and pure organic honey) and a steady stream of fruit flies to keep the brood coming. I really hope I’m over 1,000 workers this time next year. How large is your colony?

 

That feeding sounds absolutely perfect. My colony got nanitics in mid august and is now at a few hundred workers. I typically use crickets and sunburst as their main diet, with the occasional fruit fly.


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#18 Offline LowkeyLoaded - Posted December 28 2020 - 11:19 AM

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Here's a quick update of my colony!
They have now started their first trash pile. Right now it only consist of fruit fly carcasses.
And I finally got to use my Bioquip battery operated aspirator!



Check out the new clutch of eggs in the back! Also, notice how bloated the gastors are on these workers, you can really see their gastor stripes much better after they have been feeding heavily! They look like they are going to burst!
Attached File  CCE4F9F3-79CA-4B3C-A506-204773DD4796.jpeg   201.43KB   2 downloads

A pic of the queen resting behind a stalactite on the ceiling.
Attached File  2F8280D9-0EA1-4C8D-A765-926E00E51A92.jpeg   201KB   2 downloads

A pic of some of the pupae. Most of these should be open in less than a week pushing the colony’s numbers to over 30! I think I have counted 13 pupae and a two large clutches of eggs I would estimate to be around 30 -35 eggs total and just a handful of small to medium larvae 5-6. Not that you can see all of that in this photo.
Attached File  0AC99816-2FDC-49E9-88BB-06857268D165.jpeg   157.79KB   1 downloads

EGGS!!! and some larvae. Btw we are at 23 workers.
Attached File  3BEBD4C9-1C20-42F2-9295-2C2FD4142204.jpeg   287.5KB   1 downloads

Edited by LowkeyLoaded, December 30 2020 - 10:44 PM.

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#19 Offline LowkeyLoaded - Posted January 8 2021 - 1:14 PM

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Photos taken on January 6th.
Approximately 35-36 workers now.
Previous egg clutch has hatched and now there are many small larvae and another fresh clutch of eggs.

We’ve got our first major!
Attached File  7CF56421-BFCE-45F5-8450-75EF8F86AA06.jpeg   253.59KB   1 downloads
Another shot of the major.
Attached File  CB7F3EC3-C08A-4C17-AE7B-317374591C56.jpeg   318KB   1 downloads
Shot of the colony slowly starting to fill up this mini hearth.
In 2 months time or less I will need to move them to something a bit larger.
Attached File  11C667DA-C53C-4009-8DDB-1CB888F024D2.jpeg   263.46KB   1 downloads
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#20 Offline Spazmops - Posted January 8 2021 - 9:01 PM

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Those pics are awesome! Do you have any tips for getting the lighting so clear?
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Ants I have:

1 Formica fusca group- 0 workers

1 Tetramorium immigrans colony-20 workers

1 Dorymyrmex insanus- 1 queen, used to have workers

 

1 large P. occidentalis colony- around 50 workers, plenty of brood

 

 






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