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The Genus Trachymyrmex Has Been Broken Up

trachymyrmex taxonomy news

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13 replies to this topic

#1 Offline Antennal_Scrobe - Posted October 31 2019 - 1:25 PM

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There has been an interesting development in the field of myrmecology; the genus Trachymyrmex has been split into the 3 genera TrachymyrmexParatrachymyrmex, and MycetomoelleriusTrachymyrmex contains 9 North American species, Paratrachymyrmex consists of 9 additional species scattered across the Neotropics, and Mycetomoellerius encompasses a whopping 30 species with the diversity centered on Brazil, though the North American M. turrifex is included in the genus.


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Currently keeping:

 

Tetramorium immigrans, Pogonomyrmex occidentalis

Myrmica punctiventris, Formica subsericea

Formica pallidefulva, Aphaeogaster cf. rudis

Camponotus pennsylvanicus

Camponotus nearcticus

Crematogaster cerasi

Temnothorax ambiguus

Prenolepis imparis


#2 Offline Da_NewAntOnTheBlock - Posted October 31 2019 - 1:28 PM

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Interesting, keep us posted
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There is a important time for everything, important place for everyone, an important person for everybody, and an important ant for each and every ant keeper and myrmecologist alike


#3 Offline gcsnelling - Posted October 31 2019 - 5:55 PM

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Link to the paper? Shall be interested to see how this plays out.


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#4 Offline ponerinecat - Posted October 31 2019 - 7:06 PM

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 photographers are gonna have a fit over this


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#5 Offline Manitobant - Posted November 1 2019 - 8:26 AM

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photographers are gonna have a fit over this

RIP alex wild...

#6 Offline Kalidas - Posted November 1 2019 - 8:40 AM

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Oh woah, that's an interesting update. Why did they break up the genus?

#7 Offline Antennal_Scrobe - Posted November 1 2019 - 12:00 PM

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They did a DNA test or something like that, and found that Trachymyrmex was actually 3 genera.


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Currently keeping:

 

Tetramorium immigrans, Pogonomyrmex occidentalis

Myrmica punctiventris, Formica subsericea

Formica pallidefulva, Aphaeogaster cf. rudis

Camponotus pennsylvanicus

Camponotus nearcticus

Crematogaster cerasi

Temnothorax ambiguus

Prenolepis imparis


#8 Offline Antennal_Scrobe - Posted November 1 2019 - 12:01 PM

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 photographers are gonna have a fit over this

Not to mention the poor grad student who's gonna have to change all those names on AntWeb.


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Currently keeping:

 

Tetramorium immigrans, Pogonomyrmex occidentalis

Myrmica punctiventris, Formica subsericea

Formica pallidefulva, Aphaeogaster cf. rudis

Camponotus pennsylvanicus

Camponotus nearcticus

Crematogaster cerasi

Temnothorax ambiguus

Prenolepis imparis


#9 Offline Martialis - Posted November 1 2019 - 5:26 PM

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Here's the paper:

 

https://onlinelibrar...1111/syen.12370


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Spoiler

#10 Offline gcsnelling - Posted November 1 2019 - 5:44 PM

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I know several of the authors which gives me a little more hope for this split.


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#11 Offline dspdrew - Posted November 2 2019 - 6:07 AM

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Makes me wonder how many other genera with such big variations in characteristics we will find are actually multiple genera. I always wonder about the coastal variety vs. the desert variety of Pogonomyrmex californicus.


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#12 Offline Da_NewAntOnTheBlock - Posted November 2 2019 - 6:14 AM

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Interesting, is it that palpable of a difference that DNA testing would just support some observations by eye/ watching their behavior?

There is a important time for everything, important place for everyone, an important person for everybody, and an important ant for each and every ant keeper and myrmecologist alike


#13 Offline Antennal_Scrobe - Posted November 2 2019 - 7:42 AM

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Nevermind, apparently Acromyrmex striatus is still a part of Acromyrmex, and the connection to Trachymyrmex is weakly supported and should be ignored.


Edited by Antennal_Scrobe, November 2 2019 - 7:48 AM.

Currently keeping:

 

Tetramorium immigrans, Pogonomyrmex occidentalis

Myrmica punctiventris, Formica subsericea

Formica pallidefulva, Aphaeogaster cf. rudis

Camponotus pennsylvanicus

Camponotus nearcticus

Crematogaster cerasi

Temnothorax ambiguus

Prenolepis imparis


#14 Offline gcsnelling - Posted November 2 2019 - 12:10 PM

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Makes me wonder how many other genera with such big variations in characteristics we will find are actually multiple genera. I always wonder about the coastal variety vs. the desert variety of Pogonomyrmex californicus.

 

Something I have always wondered about myself.


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