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ANTdrew's Native Plants and Ants Journal

native plants

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#101 Offline ANTdrew - Posted July 27 2020 - 11:42 AM

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Update 7-27-2020

There are no byFormica feeders nor Sunburst out in nature, so how do ants get their carbohydrates out in the wild? We all know about aphid tending, but many native plants provide sugary exudates directly to our favorite six-legged friends. Here are a couple of examples:

Crematogaster nectaring on trumpet creeper (Campsis radicans):
IMG 7742

Camponotus and Monomorium gathering exudates on Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) stems. I sometimes regret planting this thuggish plant, but I like it more now after observing this.

IMG 7739
IMG 7737

Crematogaster feeding on partridge pea (Chaemachrista fasiculata) nectaries:

IMG 7740

The bad news is that I'm back to the drawing board with my front bed because it had to be dug up again after some Biblical flood events trashed our basement yet again. Oh well, at least I didn't plant any perennials yet. :/

Edited by ANTdrew, July 27 2020 - 1:27 PM.

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"The ants are a people not strong, yet they prepare their meat in the summer." Prov. 30:25


#102 Online Hayashi - Posted July 27 2020 - 12:57 PM

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This is a beautiful journal. Thank you for sharing.
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#103 Offline ANTdrew - Posted July 27 2020 - 1:13 PM

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This is a beautiful journal. Thank you for sharing.

Thank you, my friend. That means a lot.

"The ants are a people not strong, yet they prepare their meat in the summer." Prov. 30:25


#104 Online Hayashi - Posted July 27 2020 - 6:48 PM

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In September of last year you posted a picture of a praying mantis. Do you know what species it is? It has really great colors!
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#105 Offline ANTdrew - Posted July 28 2020 - 3:01 AM

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Thanks! Pretty sure that was a Chinese mantis, Tenodera sinensis.

"The ants are a people not strong, yet they prepare their meat in the summer." Prov. 30:25


#106 Offline Kaelwizard - Posted July 31 2020 - 8:03 AM

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I find Chinese mantids annually around that time. Unfortunately at that point they’ll only live another month or so.

Temnothorax longispinosus colony.

 

Ponera pennsylvanica queen.

 

Tetramorium immigrans queen.

 

Formica glacialis colony.


#107 Offline CatsnAnts - Posted August 1 2020 - 6:41 AM

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Like I said, I don’t tend to explore much on this website, but this journal is really unique! It’s nice to see someone that’s fascinated by plants - and actually knows what they’re talking about! Great pictures!


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#108 Offline ANTdrew - Posted August 1 2020 - 7:59 AM

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Like I said, I don’t tend to explore much on this website, but this journal is really unique! It’s nice to see someone that’s fascinated by plants - and actually knows what they’re talking about! Great pictures!

Thank you, my friend. Everything in nature is connected. Without native plants, there would be no native ants.
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"The ants are a people not strong, yet they prepare their meat in the summer." Prov. 30:25


#109 Offline ponerinecat - Posted August 1 2020 - 7:06 PM

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I don't see too many ants on plants, which is a bit strange. Could just have to do with what types of ants we have here.



#110 Offline ANTdrew - Posted August 2 2020 - 8:54 AM

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I don't see too many ants on plants, which is a bit strange. Could just have to do with what types of ants we have here.

Hmmm, it could do with the make up of native ants vs native vegetation. Sounds like both are pretty skewed in human dominated areas in CA. It could also do with the more arid climate. It’s worth looking into in any case.
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"The ants are a people not strong, yet they prepare their meat in the summer." Prov. 30:25


#111 Offline ponerinecat - Posted August 2 2020 - 6:47 PM

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Definitely a possibility. Only ants here that interact avidly with plants are the invasive L humile.


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#112 Online NickAnter - Posted August 2 2020 - 6:48 PM

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In the Sierras I see Lasius and Camponotus going high into these trees whose leaves secrete a tasty liquid(The Vespula are all over them too). Ill make sure to take pictures of the trees and have them ID.


Colonies:

Nylanderia vividula   (800 workers, and many male alates)   Founding Queens                          

Lasius niger   (15 workers)                                                     Solenopsis xyloni   (dark pupae)

Lasius cf. americanus   (45 workers)                                     Tetramorium bicarinatum   (dark pupae)

Pheidole navigans   (16 workers)

Solenopsis molesta group  (1 worker)                                 


#113 Offline ponerinecat - Posted August 2 2020 - 6:52 PM

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In the Sierras I see Lasius and Camponotus going high into these trees whose leaves secrete a tasty liquid(The Vespula are all over them too). Ill make sure to take pictures of the trees and have them ID.

Interesting. Locally the only ants I see in pine trees are Liometopum, while oak trees are preferred by Crematogaster. Camponotus seem to stay on the ground. Likely a difference in species though.



#114 Online NickAnter - Posted August 3 2020 - 6:57 AM

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In the Sierras I see Lasius and Camponotus going high into these trees whose leaves secrete a tasty liquid(The Vespula are all over them too). Ill make sure to take pictures of the trees and have them ID.

Interesting. Locally the only ants I see in pine trees are Liometopum, while oak trees are preferred by Crematogaster. Camponotus seem to stay on the ground. Likely a difference in species though.

 

Yeah, mainly only see modoc there. The Lasius also go into what I think are aspen trees, where they presumably tend aphids high off the ground.


Colonies:

Nylanderia vividula   (800 workers, and many male alates)   Founding Queens                          

Lasius niger   (15 workers)                                                     Solenopsis xyloni   (dark pupae)

Lasius cf. americanus   (45 workers)                                     Tetramorium bicarinatum   (dark pupae)

Pheidole navigans   (16 workers)

Solenopsis molesta group  (1 worker)                                 





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