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Queen Ant ID (Crematogaster cf. mutans) (Trabuco Canyon, CA) (5-12-2015)

crematogaster trabuco canyon california ant id dspdrew alate

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11 replies to this topic

#1 Offline dspdrew - Posted May 12 2015 - 5:35 PM

dspdrew
  • LocationSanta Ana, CA

1. Location of collection: Trabuco Canyon, California.
2. Date of collection:  4-27-2015.
3. Habitat of collection:  Chaparral, oak forest.
4. Length (from head to gaster):  7.5 mm.
5. Color, hue, pattern and texture:  All brown.
6. Distinguishing characteristics: Hairier than most Crematogaster I have seen. Relatively small gaster and large head.
7. Anything else distinctive: I found three of these, and all three looked this way.
8. Nest description:

 

med_gallery_2_402_44127.jpg

 

med_gallery_2_402_272751.jpg

 

med_gallery_2_402_327915.jpg



#2 Offline dspdrew - Posted May 12 2015 - 5:42 PM

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  • LocationSanta Ana, CA

I usually don't post Crematogaster ID request threads because of how hard the California species are to tell apart, but these looked unique enough that I decided to post it.

 

If I was to go by AntWeb, my best guess would probably be C. californica.



#3 Offline Gregory2455 - Posted May 12 2015 - 6:35 PM

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Why do you even bother with this drew? Haha. Crematogaster are impossible but good luck.



#4 Offline dspdrew - Posted May 12 2015 - 6:37 PM

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  • LocationSanta Ana, CA

I know, but I explained why.



#5 Offline Gregory2455 - Posted May 12 2015 - 6:39 PM

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I know, but I explained why.

I know but still. :P



#6 Offline Alza - Posted May 12 2015 - 6:41 PM

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What is that round thing on its head used for ?



#7 Offline cpman - Posted May 12 2015 - 6:50 PM

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That is an ocellus, and it is used to sense light.



#8 Offline Gregory2455 - Posted June 15 2015 - 4:13 PM

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Drew, these were the ones that "look parasitic", right?



#9 Offline dspdrew - Posted June 15 2015 - 4:38 PM

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  • LocationSanta Ana, CA

Yes. I caught tons of them last week. A few of them have removed their wings this time, so we'll see what happens.



#10 Offline dspdrew - Posted June 11 2016 - 10:23 PM

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  • LocationSanta Ana, CA
James C. Trager, mentioned somewhere else, that this might be Crematogaster mutans which is thought to be parasitic. After reading about them, I would totally agree.
 

The females of mutans can be easily separated from all other North American species by the very long, silky, yellowish, appressed pubescence, the compressed thorax, depressed gaster, and proportionately very large head.


This species in the female has a very large head, and the least voluminous thorax and gaster of any North American species known to me. The habitus is thus much like a dulqtic species. As temporary social parasitic species are known in the genus Crematogaster, the discovery of another would not be too surprising. If this new species is a temporary parasite the host must be either Crematogaster californica or Crematogaster mormonum or both, to my knowledge the only other ground nesting species occurring with any commonness in the foot-hills and lower mountains of California and western Nevada. Unfortunately, mixed incipient colonies, if they exist, have not yet been found. (Buren 1968)


The queens are also described as being 8mm in length.

#11 Offline JWRay - Posted June 11 2016 - 11:31 PM

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Any chance you have gotten your hands on the generic revision of North American species from 2009?  Its a PhD Dissertation from UTEP.



#12 Offline dspdrew - Posted June 12 2016 - 12:04 AM

dspdrew
  • LocationSanta Ana, CA

Nope. Not I.







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: crematogaster, trabuco canyon, california, ant id, dspdrew, alate

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