Jump to content

  • Chat
  •  
  •  



Welcome to Formiculture.com!

This is a website for anyone interested in Myrmecology and all aspects of finding, keeping, and studying ants. The site and forum are free to use, and contain no ads for members. Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation points to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!

Photo
* * * * * 1 votes

Care Sheet - Aphaenogaster picea

aphaenogaster picea

22 replies to this topic

#1 Offline dspdrew - Posted March 27 2017 - 10:00 AM

dspdrew
  • LocationSanta Ana, CA
Scientific Name: Aphaenogaster picea
 
Common Name: Unknown
 
Distribution: Northeastern, and some Southeastern United states.

Queen size: 7-8mm
 
Worker size: 4-6mm
 
Natural Habitat: Found in dead/moist wood in mountainous or rocky habitats of higher elevations.

Circadian Activity: Mostly diurnal, but will forage at night.

Mating Flight: Their major flight is in August after a light rain, and have been known to fly before and after August.

Queen Founding Method: Fully Claustral.

Monogyne or Polygyne: Monogyne

Average time from egg to worker: Egg to larva - 10-15 days; larva to pupa (no cocoon) - 15-20 days; Pupa to worker – 15-20 days. Time may vary with temperature. (Note: can be very slow to start)

Recommended Temperature: 75-80°F (24-27°C)

Recommended Humidity: Mid humidity level of 30-50%.

Preferred Foods: Mainly insects such as termites, fruit flies, crickets, meal worms, and wax worms. This species regularly refuses liquids by covering up any sources. Very little to no activity with feeders.

Hibernation Details: In the wild temperatures below freezing are common, even up to -40C/F. In captivity it is advised to stay above the freezing point as we are unable to easily duplicate the slow cool down into freezing temps to allow the anti-freeze in their blood to work properly. Hibernation is recommended between 39F (4C) - 50F (10C).

Escape Barrier Methods: Extra virgin olive oil works for me.

Difficulty rating: Easy to keep, can be difficult to start.

Bite and/or Sting rating: None

Special Care or Interesting Notes: This species prefers a constantly hydrated nest with dry spots. This species also lacks a social stomach, so foods will have to be carried back to the nest. Aphaenogaster have been recorded making “sponges” to absorb liquids on rare occasions, otherwise liquids are rarely taken.

Description: Aphaenogaster picea is an arboreal species that aids forests and woods in seed dispersal. This species will eat the skin off of seeds and drop the remains, which usually results in the start of a new sapling or plant. Dark red/brown coloration with the last 4 segments of their antennae being lighter in color. workers will have an easily identifiable yellow tipped gaster.

Additional Links:










Information submitted by Loops117
  • noebl1, Martialis, Nathant2131 and 2 others like this

#2 Offline Nathant2131 - Posted March 27 2017 - 2:13 PM

Nathant2131

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,506 posts
  • LocationDracut, Massachusetts

Nice. We need some more care sheets.



#3 Offline kingant18 - Posted May 23 2017 - 3:28 PM

kingant18

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 31 posts
  • LocationMercer county nj

would anyone know why mine do not move some have even died they ate a cricket after recently moving into the nest but since they got in the nest they have been at a complete stop with minimal movement and its scary. could it be that the nest is to big?


Edited by kingant18, May 23 2017 - 3:30 PM.


#4 Offline Bracchymyrmex - Posted May 23 2017 - 4:14 PM

Bracchymyrmex

    Vendor

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 321 posts
  • LocationPhiladelphia, Pennsylvania

would anyone know why mine do not move some have even died they ate a cricket after recently moving into the nest but since they got in the nest they have been at a complete stop with minimal movement and its scary. could it be that the nest is to big?

 

From what I gathered, you moved an Aphaenogaster colony into a formicarium and they have slowed their mobility? Where does the cricket come into play? I'm sorry, but this is incredibly confusing.


  • Martialis likes this

#5 Offline kingant18 - Posted May 25 2017 - 4:11 AM

kingant18

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 31 posts
  • LocationMercer county nj

i fed them a cricket after they moved in and they ate it, they are starting to die off in the outworld but the nest seems to be fine and all the ants in the nest are alive and functioning and the mobility as slowed and some are dying only in the outworld though. 


Edited by kingant18, May 25 2017 - 4:12 AM.


#6 Offline Klassien - Posted May 25 2017 - 4:32 AM

Klassien

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 55 posts
  • LocationIndiana

How old and how many workers are in your colony, and how many have died?

If you have a high population colony, those ants more than likely have reached the end of their life. Ants like to have clean nests so they'll move the dead bodies to the out world, and make a dumping site/graveyard.

Along with Bracc, I don't understand how a cricket has anything to do with them dying, unless you know the cricket has been poisoned..



#7 Offline kingant18 - Posted May 25 2017 - 4:54 AM

kingant18

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 31 posts
  • LocationMercer county nj

its a colony of about 60+ an i just got it but they are all sluggish is there anything i can do?



#8 Offline Loops117 - Posted May 25 2017 - 4:59 AM

Loops117

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 802 posts
  • LocationSouth Lyon, Michigan

its a colony of about 60+ an i just got it but they are all sluggish is there anything i can do?

 

Time to get your microscope or high powered magnifying lens. Check for mites. Also, A.picea isn't the most active species. All of my colonies are rather boring until the spurts of time they get hungry. Otherwise, i rarely see mine forage.


Posted Image
117 Colonies & Ant Farms
an Artisan Ant keeping company aimed to provide Formicaria and Insect Habitats
Now selling byformica products!
Michigan Ant Keeping - A Home for Michigan Ant Keepers.

......nobody likes a statist.

#9 Offline kingant18 - Posted May 25 2017 - 5:06 AM

kingant18

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 31 posts
  • LocationMercer county nj

so is it normal to see minimal to no movement



#10 Offline kingant18 - Posted May 25 2017 - 5:08 AM

kingant18

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 31 posts
  • LocationMercer county nj

no mites



#11 Offline Antdoggy - Posted May 26 2017 - 6:02 AM

Antdoggy

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 15 posts

so is it normal to see minimal to no movement

where do you live? Could be hibernating 



#12 Offline FeedTheAnts - Posted July 24 2017 - 4:13 PM

FeedTheAnts

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,221 posts
  • LocationVirginia

Description: Aphaenogaster picea is an arboreal species that aids forests and woods in seed dispersal. This species will eat the skin off of seeds and drop the remains, which usually results in the start of a new sapling or plant. Dark red/brown coloration with the last 4 segments of their antennae being lighter in color. workers will have an easily identifiable yellow tipped gaster.

 

How many species of Aphaenogaster have this yellow spot on their gaster, is it just picea. There are many different species around here that have the yellow spot. The colony I have has it too, and I'm wondering if this is a sure sign that it is picea.


Colonies:                                                                      

Crematogaster ashmeadi -- 3000 workers ESCAPED  :*(                                                    I just put my ants in hibernation(some)  :) 

Camponotus chromaiodes -- 75 workers KILLED BY ^

Formica pallidefulva -- 80 workers                

Pheidole sp -- 1 queen - 9 workers(why did a lot die... who knows?)      

Tetramorium sp -- 12 workers

 New Colonies! (Queens collected from founding chambers) Camponotus subbarabatus (1 worker) and Camponotus castaneus (5 workers and more on the way)

 


#13 Offline Loops117 - Posted August 2 2017 - 4:17 AM

Loops117

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 802 posts
  • LocationSouth Lyon, Michigan

 

Description: Aphaenogaster picea is an arboreal species that aids forests and woods in seed dispersal. This species will eat the skin off of seeds and drop the remains, which usually results in the start of a new sapling or plant. Dark red/brown coloration with the last 4 segments of their antennae being lighter in color. workers will have an easily identifiable yellow tipped gaster.

 

How many species of Aphaenogaster have this yellow spot on their gaster, is it just picea. There are many different species around here that have the yellow spot. The colony I have has it too, and I'm wondering if this is a sure sign that it is picea.

 

From my personal experience and research, A.picea are the only species with a yellow tipped gaster. But this is also for michigan.


Posted Image
117 Colonies & Ant Farms
an Artisan Ant keeping company aimed to provide Formicaria and Insect Habitats
Now selling byformica products!
Michigan Ant Keeping - A Home for Michigan Ant Keepers.

......nobody likes a statist.

#14 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted August 2 2017 - 4:54 AM

Connectimyrmex

    Advanced Member

  • Junior Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,864 posts
  • LocationAvon, Connecticut

Please mention that Aphaenogaster don't just "cover up" their foods. I've frequently observed mine using little sticks/pieces of dirt to transport honey to the nest after covering the sugary liquids(Aphaenogaster species don't have social stomachs).


Hawaiiant (Ben)

Keeper of
Miniature Labradoodle
Baby Wolf Spider
Mud Dauber wasp larvae
Ochetellus Glaber
Solenopsis Geminata
Brachymyrmex Obscurior
Cardiocondyla Emeryi
Tetramorium Bicarinatum
Plagiolepis Alluaudi
Anoplolepis Gracilipes
Technomyrmex Difficilis
Pheidole Megacephala
Aholehole fish
Cowrie snail
Sea Fan Worm
100+ sea squirts
Tree seedlings
Ghost Crab
Day Gecko
Small Fat Centipede
Endemic Lacewing larva
Vernal Pool shrimps

#15 Offline FeedTheAnts - Posted August 2 2017 - 4:56 AM

FeedTheAnts

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,221 posts
  • LocationVirginia

But I have seen so many species on my property that range in size a lot and they all have it. They also differ in where they nest, when they are active, and the queens look way different.


  • Ant_Dude2908 likes this

Colonies:                                                                      

Crematogaster ashmeadi -- 3000 workers ESCAPED  :*(                                                    I just put my ants in hibernation(some)  :) 

Camponotus chromaiodes -- 75 workers KILLED BY ^

Formica pallidefulva -- 80 workers                

Pheidole sp -- 1 queen - 9 workers(why did a lot die... who knows?)      

Tetramorium sp -- 12 workers

 New Colonies! (Queens collected from founding chambers) Camponotus subbarabatus (1 worker) and Camponotus castaneus (5 workers and more on the way)

 


#16 Offline Loops117 - Posted August 2 2017 - 6:53 AM

Loops117

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 802 posts
  • LocationSouth Lyon, Michigan

Please mention that Aphaenogaster don't just "cover up" their foods. I've frequently observed mine using little sticks/pieces of dirt to transport honey to the nest after covering the sugary liquids(Aphaenogaster species don't have social stomachs).

 

You are correct. I mention later in the care sheet that they use makeshift sponges to absorb liquids to bring back to the nest. I'll rewrite the preferred foods section and have drew fix it. Thank you.


Posted Image
117 Colonies & Ant Farms
an Artisan Ant keeping company aimed to provide Formicaria and Insect Habitats
Now selling byformica products!
Michigan Ant Keeping - A Home for Michigan Ant Keepers.

......nobody likes a statist.

#17 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted August 2 2017 - 9:55 AM

Connectimyrmex

    Advanced Member

  • Junior Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,864 posts
  • LocationAvon, Connecticut

 

Please mention that Aphaenogaster don't just "cover up" their foods. I've frequently observed mine using little sticks/pieces of dirt to transport honey to the nest after covering the sugary liquids(Aphaenogaster species don't have social stomachs).

 

You are correct. I mention later in the care sheet that they use makeshift sponges to absorb liquids to bring back to the nest. I'll rewrite the preferred foods section and have drew fix it. Thank you.

 

Thanks! I didn't notice the sponge part :P


Hawaiiant (Ben)

Keeper of
Miniature Labradoodle
Baby Wolf Spider
Mud Dauber wasp larvae
Ochetellus Glaber
Solenopsis Geminata
Brachymyrmex Obscurior
Cardiocondyla Emeryi
Tetramorium Bicarinatum
Plagiolepis Alluaudi
Anoplolepis Gracilipes
Technomyrmex Difficilis
Pheidole Megacephala
Aholehole fish
Cowrie snail
Sea Fan Worm
100+ sea squirts
Tree seedlings
Ghost Crab
Day Gecko
Small Fat Centipede
Endemic Lacewing larva
Vernal Pool shrimps

#18 Offline Kaelwizard - Posted August 16 2018 - 11:35 AM

Kaelwizard

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,318 posts
  • LocationMI

does anyone know where i can find this species or A. rudis in my area?



#19 Offline rbarreto - Posted August 16 2018 - 12:12 PM

rbarreto

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 645 posts
  • LocationOttawa, On

does anyone know where i can find this species or A. rudis in my area?

Check local forests or parks. You want to check for areas which have elaiosome bearing plants (Trillium, bloodroot).They tend to avoid rural areas.


My journal featuring most of my ants.

My other journal featuring Formica Bradleyi.

Check our my store here!


#20 Offline Ferox_Formicae - Posted October 21 2018 - 6:13 PM

Ferox_Formicae

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,304 posts
  • LocationProsperity, South Carolina

As far as the common name goes, I have heard this species called the Pitch-black Collared Ant.


Spoiler





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: aphaenogaster picea

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users