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Temnothorax sp.

temnothorax

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#1 Offline Ant_KeeperSeb09 - Posted July 29 2020 - 9:46 AM

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I caught a queen very close to a forest and I'm 100% sure it's temnothorax, if anyone has tips on how to keep temnothorax, would be apreciated


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#2 Offline CatsnAnts - Posted July 29 2020 - 10:19 AM

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They are fairly simple to keep. Most colonies don’t exceed the low hundreds, and they aren’t picky either. Just put her in a regular test tube (I keep my single queens in a 16mm, but 13mm should work better if you have them). As for formicarium options later on, you can either leave them in the test tube or create a small formicarium. I feed mine honey and mealworms and they do just fine.

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#3 Offline AntsDakota - Posted July 29 2020 - 12:45 PM

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They're also highly polygynous if you find more queens.


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"God made..... all the creatures that move along the ground according to their kinds. (including ants) And God saw that it was good. Genesis 1:25 NIV version


#4 Offline CatsnAnts - Posted July 29 2020 - 1:04 PM

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They're also highly polygynous if you find more queens.


That’s debatable. Most likely they will get along just fine, but they still have the tendency to kill of a queen here and there. Temnothorax ambiguus, for example, is known to be pleometric (although it’s probably because of limited resources, which isn’t a problem in captivity), one of my queens in my 8 queen colony has her antennae ripped of before being killed. My fifteen queen T. curvispinosus colony has now had three queens dismembered. If you start a colony, only introduce new queens for around three days after you put the original queens in the test tube, or else they will fight.

Edited by CatsnAnts, July 29 2020 - 1:05 PM.

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#5 Offline AntsDakota - Posted July 29 2020 - 1:09 PM

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They're also highly polygynous if you find more queens.

That’s debatable. Most likely they will get along just fine, but they still have the tendency to kill of a queen here and there. Temnothorax ambiguus, for example, is known to be pleometric (although it’s probably because of limited resources, which isn’t a problem in captivity), one of my queens in my 8 queen colony has her antennae ripped of before being killed. My fifteen queen T. curvispinosus colony has now had three queens dismembered. If you start a colony, only introduce new queens for around three days after you put the original queens in the test tube, or else they will fight.
Polygynous species will kill queens if there are too many, but 1-5 is ideal for a small colony. Any more probably will be dismembered, as you mentioned..........
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"God made..... all the creatures that move along the ground according to their kinds. (including ants) And God saw that it was good. Genesis 1:25 NIV version


#6 Offline Kaelwizard - Posted July 29 2020 - 2:51 PM

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Wild Temnothorx colonies almost always have 1 queen. At least all of the species I have read about. Also, all T. longispinosus colonies I have found have had 1 queen.

#7 Offline ponerinecat - Posted July 29 2020 - 3:46 PM

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They're also highly polygynous if you find more queens.

Not really... I believe they have the potential to be, but it seems like its usually more limited to pleometris. Like kael mentioned, pretty much all the wild temnothorax I've observed have been monogynous. Whether they were solitarily founded or secondarily monogynous is unknown to me.


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#8 Offline Kaelwizard - Posted July 29 2020 - 4:11 PM

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They're also highly polygynous if you find more queens.

Not really... I believe they have the potential to be, but it seems like its usually more limited to pleometris. Like kael mentioned, pretty much all the wild temnothorax I've observed have been monogynous. Whether they were solitarily founded or secondarily monogynous is unknown to me.
I believe T. longispinosus exhibit pleometrosis, secondary monogyny, secondary polygyny and founding solitarily. That’s at least what I interpreted from its page on AntWiki.

#9 Offline Ant_KeeperSeb09 - Posted July 30 2020 - 7:59 AM

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They're also highly polygynous if you find more queens.


That’s debatable. Most likely they will get along just fine, but they still have the tendency to kill of a queen here and there. Temnothorax ambiguus, for example, is known to be pleometric (although it’s probably because of limited resources, which isn’t a problem in captivity), one of my queens in my 8 queen colony has her antennae ripped of before being killed. My fifteen queen T. curvispinosus colony has now had three queens dismembered. If you start a colony, only introduce new queens for around three days after you put the original queens in the test tube, or else they will fight.

 

Thanks for the information :)


Thanks to everyone for this preciouse information :D


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