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Finally found Camponotus us-ca02

camponotus ca02 us-ca02

55 replies to this topic

#21 Offline Rstheant - Posted April 2 2019 - 1:35 PM

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You don’t have one for clarithorax!!! Durum chhhhhhh......

:blink:

#22 Offline Martialis - Posted April 2 2019 - 5:42 PM

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Now write a paper describing them in detail using scientific language and submit it to a journal so that you can actually name it.


Edited by Martialis, April 2 2019 - 5:46 PM.

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Spoiler

#23 Offline TennesseeAnts - Posted April 2 2019 - 6:32 PM

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I say Camponotus californicus.
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#24 Offline KBant - Posted April 3 2019 - 1:14 AM

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Potential Names
Camponotus fatassicus
Camponotus wumbo
Camponotus extra large
Can you supersize that camponutus?
My 500 pound camponotus
Camponutus Formiculture
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#25 Offline Leo - Posted April 3 2019 - 1:54 AM

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ITS D GIGAS



#26 Offline B_rad0806 - Posted April 3 2019 - 8:29 AM

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Formiculture does song good...
but I’m going with Nurbs or Nurbert

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#27 Offline anttics - Posted April 3 2019 - 9:04 AM

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Camponotus californicus. Camponotus formiture. Camponotus Nurbrew. Camponotus tanos, camponotus titan. And my fav. Camponotus Athos. Athos was a greek giant who created mountains.

Edited by anttics, April 3 2019 - 9:08 AM.


#28 Offline FeedTheAnts - Posted April 3 2019 - 9:06 AM

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Camponotus nurbancensis

There you have it


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I accidentally froze all my ants 


#29 Offline Rstheant - Posted April 3 2019 - 2:31 PM

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Just go with WNC

Weird-named Camponotus

#30 Offline gcsnelling - Posted April 3 2019 - 3:10 PM

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It is not impossible that when/if someone digs into the history of this specific ant it will be found that there is already a name attached to it somewhere in the deep dark depths of time.


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#31 Offline Zeiss - Posted April 3 2019 - 8:21 PM

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Camponotus steve  

 

Thank you for coming to my Ted Talk.


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#32 Offline AntHUB - Posted January 29 2020 - 7:02 PM

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update? has this been classified yet, the coloration totally reminds me of Carebara longii. Totally different ant but the color scheme is almost identical.

IMG_3809.jpg

 

From what I know about describing species, here's my relayed info,

if you were to describe the species and name it after formiculture (which might be difficult) it would likely be called formiculturii, formiculturae, or formicultae. If we were to name it after nurbs ants it would probably be called nurbsii or something similar, but nurbs would have to approve of him being a benefactor. A behavioral review would have to be published, and holotypes would have to be established. luckily they already exist! but It would be beneficial to have extra type specimens for the study.

 

If you guys are interested, I need to start writing some papers soon. I might reach out to some experts to get this species described, but I would need specimens for a type collection. Anyone know if there are any males out there? 

 

TLDR (if you're really that lazy)

Could be named 

Camponotus formiculturii

Camponotus formiculturae

Camponotus nurbsii

(these might be improperly conjugated, I'll update them once I've made sure)

 

 

I would get it described but I'd need specimens of workers, queen, and probably a male. Or a location that has these species.


Edited by AntHUB, January 29 2020 - 7:33 PM.

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#33 Offline AntHUB - Posted January 29 2020 - 7:04 PM

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I checked, no classification yet, all literature is seemingly missing. its like an odd cover up.


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#34 Offline Antennal_Scrobe - Posted January 29 2020 - 7:21 PM

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There are at least 4 undescribed Myrmica species in my state, and at least 2 undescribed Aphaenogaster. While the Aphaenogaster are part of a complex and impossible to distinguish, the Myrmica are all visually distinctive, including one whole undescribed species group. The undescribed Myrmica species actually do have names. M. evanida is like the described species M. americana but has a less prominent lamella (spike or ridge thing) on the antenna, and is usually bright orange. M. sculptilis has prominent exoskeleton ridges which have a distinctive round cross section, and M. smithana, which is the only other member of the sculptilis group, differs in the way the bases of its antennae are covered by the exoskeleton. Whether its antennal sockets are more or less enclosed, I don't remember. The remaining species is related to Myrmica fracticornis and is named, though I do not know the full name; all of these species are also referred to as "AF-eva", "AF-scu" etc, and for the fourth species, I only know the abbreviation, which is "AF-sub".


Currently keeping:

 

Tetramorium immigrans, Pogonomyrmex occidentalis

Myrmica punctiventris, Formica subsericea

Formica pallidefulva, Aphaeogaster cf. rudis

Camponotus pennsylvanicus

Camponotus nearcticus

Crematogaster cerasi

Temnothorax ambiguus

Prenolepis imparis


#35 Offline Ferox_Formicae - Posted January 29 2020 - 8:41 PM

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There are at least 4 undescribed Myrmica species in my state, and at least 2 undescribed Aphaenogaster. While the Aphaenogaster are part of a complex and impossible to distinguish, the Myrmica are all visually distinctive, including one whole undescribed species group. The undescribed Myrmica species actually do have names. M. evanida is like the described species M. americana but has a less prominent lamella (spike or ridge thing) on the antenna, and is usually bright orange. M. sculptilis has prominent exoskeleton ridges which have a distinctive round cross section, and M. smithana, which is the only other member of the sculptilis group, differs in the way the bases of its antennae are covered by the exoskeleton. Whether its antennal sockets are more or less enclosed, I don't remember. The remaining species is related to Myrmica fracticornis and is named, though I do not know the full name; all of these species are also referred to as "AF-eva", "AF-scu" etc, and for the fourth species, I only know the abbreviation, which is "AF-sub".

Myrmica classification is just messed up. I say this about a lot of genera, but it is in desperate need of a revision. I came across this large queen in Burtchville, Michigan a few years ago, and when I finally got around to keying her a few weeks ago, do you know what ridiculous name the species had? Freaking, Myrmica sp. "sculp"! What kind of a name is "sculp"? The sculpture of that species isn't even that noticeable! Good thing is, I don't think the species has ever been found in Michigan before, so new state record!

 

As for my vote for the name of Camponotus us-ca02, I'm gonna go with Camponotus dichromus, coming from the Greek word for bicolored. I know it's kind of stupid, considering that many Tanaemyrmex are bicolored like this, but hey, most scientific names aren't taken very seriously. I mean, Monomorium monomoriumStrumigenys (coming from the Latin word struma, meaning "a glandular swelling" and the Greek word genys, meaning "jaw," which isn't very fitting as only species within the mandibularis complex fit that description)? Freaking, Han solo? I think Camponotus dichromus sounds pretty nice, though I know the chances are astronomically low that the species will be gifted with that name when it is finally described. It would be pretty cool if it were though, or at least if some species was named Camponotus dichromus.


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Currently Keeping:

 

Camponotus chromaiodes, Camponotus nearcticus, Stigmatomma pallipesStrumigenys brevisetosaStrumigenys clypeataStrumigenys louisianaeStrumigenys membraniferaStrumigenys reflexaStrumigenys rostrata

 

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#36 Offline Antennal_Scrobe - Posted January 30 2020 - 5:03 AM

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You must have found Myrmica sculptilis then!


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Currently keeping:

 

Tetramorium immigrans, Pogonomyrmex occidentalis

Myrmica punctiventris, Formica subsericea

Formica pallidefulva, Aphaeogaster cf. rudis

Camponotus pennsylvanicus

Camponotus nearcticus

Crematogaster cerasi

Temnothorax ambiguus

Prenolepis imparis


#37 Offline Ferox_Formicae - Posted January 30 2020 - 7:06 AM

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You must have found Myrmica sculptilis then!

Ah! Neat!


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Currently Keeping:

 

Camponotus chromaiodes, Camponotus nearcticus, Stigmatomma pallipesStrumigenys brevisetosaStrumigenys clypeataStrumigenys louisianaeStrumigenys membraniferaStrumigenys reflexaStrumigenys rostrata

 

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#38 Offline camponotuskeeper - Posted January 30 2020 - 9:25 AM

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There are at least 4 undescribed Myrmica species in my state, and at least 2 undescribed Aphaenogaster. While the Aphaenogaster are part of a complex and impossible to distinguish, the Myrmica are all visually distinctive, including one whole undescribed species group. The undescribed Myrmica species actually do have names. M. evanida is like the described species M. americana but has a less prominent lamella (spike or ridge thing) on the antenna, and is usually bright orange. M. sculptilis has prominent exoskeleton ridges which have a distinctive round cross section, and M. smithana, which is the only other member of the sculptilis group, differs in the way the bases of its antennae are covered by the exoskeleton. Whether its antennal sockets are more or less enclosed, I don't remember. The remaining species is related to Myrmica fracticornis and is named, though I do not know the full name; all of these species are also referred to as "AF-eva", "AF-scu" etc, and for the fourth species, I only know the abbreviation, which is "AF-sub".

Myrmica classification is just messed up. I say this about a lot of genera, but it is in desperate need of a revision. I came across this large queen in Burtchville, Michigan a few years ago, and when I finally got around to keying her a few weeks ago, do you know what ridiculous name the species had? Freaking, Myrmica sp. "sculp"! What kind of a name is "sculp"? The sculpture of that species isn't even that noticeable! Good thing is, I don't think the species has ever been found in Michigan before, so new state record!

 

As for my vote for the name of Camponotus us-ca02, I'm gonna go with Camponotus dichromus, coming from the Greek word for bicolored. I know it's kind of stupid, considering that many Tanaemyrmex are bicolored like this, but hey, most scientific names aren't taken very seriously. I mean, Monomorium monomoriumStrumigenys (coming from the Latin word struma, meaning "a glandular swelling" and the Greek word genys, meaning "jaw," which isn't very fitting as only species within the mandibularis complex fit that description)? Freaking, Han solo? I think Camponotus dichromus sounds pretty nice, though I know the chances are astronomically low that the species will be gifted with that name when it is finally described. It would be pretty cool if it were though, or at least if some species was named Camponotus dichromus.

 

seriously i have a question, how many new ant state records have your found ferox


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#39 Offline Ferox_Formicae - Posted January 30 2020 - 12:09 PM

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There are at least 4 undescribed Myrmica species in my state, and at least 2 undescribed Aphaenogaster. While the Aphaenogaster are part of a complex and impossible to distinguish, the Myrmica are all visually distinctive, including one whole undescribed species group. The undescribed Myrmica species actually do have names. M. evanida is like the described species M. americana but has a less prominent lamella (spike or ridge thing) on the antenna, and is usually bright orange. M. sculptilis has prominent exoskeleton ridges which have a distinctive round cross section, and M. smithana, which is the only other member of the sculptilis group, differs in the way the bases of its antennae are covered by the exoskeleton. Whether its antennal sockets are more or less enclosed, I don't remember. The remaining species is related to Myrmica fracticornis and is named, though I do not know the full name; all of these species are also referred to as "AF-eva", "AF-scu" etc, and for the fourth species, I only know the abbreviation, which is "AF-sub".

Myrmica classification is just messed up. I say this about a lot of genera, but it is in desperate need of a revision. I came across this large queen in Burtchville, Michigan a few years ago, and when I finally got around to keying her a few weeks ago, do you know what ridiculous name the species had? Freaking, Myrmica sp. "sculp"! What kind of a name is "sculp"? The sculpture of that species isn't even that noticeable! Good thing is, I don't think the species has ever been found in Michigan before, so new state record!

 

As for my vote for the name of Camponotus us-ca02, I'm gonna go with Camponotus dichromus, coming from the Greek word for bicolored. I know it's kind of stupid, considering that many Tanaemyrmex are bicolored like this, but hey, most scientific names aren't taken very seriously. I mean, Monomorium monomoriumStrumigenys (coming from the Latin word struma, meaning "a glandular swelling" and the Greek word genys, meaning "jaw," which isn't very fitting as only species within the mandibularis complex fit that description)? Freaking, Han solo? I think Camponotus dichromus sounds pretty nice, though I know the chances are astronomically low that the species will be gifted with that name when it is finally described. It would be pretty cool if it were though, or at least if some species was named Camponotus dichromus.

 

seriously i have a question, how many new ant state records have your found ferox

 

Only a few. Gnamptogenys triangularisPseudomyrmex leptosus, and Strumigenys silvestrii from South Carolina, Hypoponera punctatissima from North Carolina, and now Myrmica sp. "sculp"/sculptilis from Michigan. Also, I know this isn't a state but an island record, but I'm the first to find Camponotus sexguttatus in in Florida Keys. I found a satellite nest in a Sea Grape tree in front of a Starbucks in Key Largo. James Wetterer is actually writing a paper about the spread of Camponotus sexguttatus, and he included my record in both the paper itself and the maps, and he mentioned me by name. I'm not sure when he's gonna publish it though.


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Currently Keeping:

 

Camponotus chromaiodes, Camponotus nearcticus, Stigmatomma pallipesStrumigenys brevisetosaStrumigenys clypeataStrumigenys louisianaeStrumigenys membraniferaStrumigenys reflexaStrumigenys rostrata

 

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#40 Offline AntsDakota - Posted January 30 2020 - 3:35 PM

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Camponotus Canulladuorum. Translation- CA02. (nulla- zero, duorum- two.)


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"God made..... all the creatures that move along the ground according to their kinds. (including ants) And God saw that it was good. Genesis 1:25 NIV version






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