Jump to content

  • Chat
  •  
  •  





Welcome to Formiculture.com!

This is a website for anyone interested in Myrmecology and all aspects of finding, keeping, and studying ants. The site and forum are free to use, and contain no ads for members. Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation points to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!

Photo
* * * * * 2 votes

Mettcollsuss's Aphaenogaster rudis Journal

journal aphaenogaster aphaenogaster rudis aphaenogaster cf. rudis ant keeping

  • Please log in to reply
70 replies to this topic

#61 Offline Mettcollsuss - Posted January 20 2019 - 12:35 PM

Mettcollsuss

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,219 posts
  • LocationChicago, IL

We were talking about this on Discord the other day, and apparently many Aphaenogaster are reluctant to take sugar water and honey.  However some will readily take crystallized sugars (regular granulated white or brown sugar.)  They will take it back to their nest, and liquefy it within the nest for feeding.

I'll try that. Thanks!



#62 Offline noebl1 - Posted January 20 2019 - 12:36 PM

noebl1

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,042 posts
  • LocationNorthern Massachusetts

It works for my A. picea, but my A. fulva were unimpressed.  Apparently there's been very positive results with A. tennesseensis as well.


  • Mettcollsuss and Thatfa666ene like this

#63 Offline Mettcollsuss - Posted January 22 2019 - 6:26 AM

Mettcollsuss

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,219 posts
  • LocationChicago, IL

We were talking about this on Discord the other day, and apparently many Aphaenogaster are reluctant to take sugar water and honey.  However some will readily take crystallized sugars (regular granulated white or brown sugar.)  They will take it back to their nest, and liquefy it within the nest for feeding.

It worked! They loved the brown sugar. Thanks.


  • noebl1 likes this

#64 Offline Mettcollsuss - Posted January 28 2019 - 2:52 PM

Mettcollsuss

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,219 posts
  • LocationChicago, IL

They have several pupae at the moment and the queen keeps laying more and more eggs. I estimate there are roughly 40-50 eggs in the pile. 



#65 Offline Ant_Dude2908 - Posted February 4 2019 - 3:14 PM

Ant_Dude2908

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,653 posts
  • LocationNashville, Tennessee
I found an A. tennesseenis queen and I'm having trouble with getting a host species. Any suggestions?
  • Mettcollsuss likes this

My journals:                                             My shop:                                                                        Tennessee Anting Thread:                 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                      

                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                         

Aphaenogaster rudis

 

Aphaenogater tenneseenis                      Ant_Dude2908's Antkeeping Supply Shop                    Tennessee Anting Thread

 

Brachyponera chinesis

 

Camponotus subbarbatus

 

Camponotus chromaiodes

 

Crematogaster ashmeadi

 

 

 

Ants I've found (in TN) : Aphaenogaster rudis, Aphaenogaster tenneseenis, Brahcyponera chinesis, Camponotus subbarbatus, Camponotus chromaiodes, Camponotus pennsylvanicus, Camponotus snellingi, Crematogaster ashmeadi, Crematogaster lineolata, Crematogaster cerasi, all Temnothorax spp., Solenopsis invicta, Solenopsis xyloni, Stigmatomma pallipes, all Strumigenys spp.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


#66 Offline rbarreto - Posted February 5 2019 - 5:27 AM

rbarreto

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 385 posts
  • LocationOttawa, On

I found an A. tennesseenis queen and I'm having trouble with getting a host species. Any suggestions?


I find Aphaenogaster population more abundant in forests away from urban areas. Try checking out a local park. They love to hide near the surface of rocks/logs exposed to the sun.
  • noebl1 and Mettcollsuss like this

My journal featuring:

Aphaenogaster picea

Lasius claviger

Lasius umbratus

Lasius sp. (black workers)

Lasius sp. (yellow/orange workers)

Formica pallidefulva (northern color form)

Prenolepis imparis

Camponotus pennsylvanicus

Camponotus novaeboracensis

Temnothorax cf. curvispinosus

Tetramorium immigrans ( 2 polygynous, 1 monogynous)

 


#67 Offline noebl1 - Posted February 5 2019 - 5:45 AM

noebl1

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,042 posts
  • LocationNorthern Massachusetts
I find Aphaenogaster population more abundant in forests away from urban areas. Try checking out a local park. They love to hide near the surface of rocks/logs exposed to the sun.

 

 

^^^^  This.  I live in the woods, and see them all Spring/Summer long during the day.  Usually easiest to spot along the side of the driveway walking in the leaves and such.  They are a pretty mobile species, so in the Spring when it's still cool, look under rocks, pieces of wood, etc for them bringing brood up to heat up in the sun.  Last summer we were assembling a swing set, and we'd find them a lot in the Spring with random brood in temporary piles under planks and other swing set pieces.  You can actually create "traps" for small colonies as well (this article has a study and design on how they did that):  https://www.hindawi....he/2012/752815/


  • Mettcollsuss, Ant_Dude2908 and rbarreto like this

#68 Offline Mettcollsuss - Posted February 27 2019 - 6:00 AM

Mettcollsuss

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,219 posts
  • LocationChicago, IL
They just leave their trash piled up in the nest and it's causing problems. The sponge had almost turned black with mold. I gonna have to move them soon.
  • noebl1 likes this

#69 Offline noebl1 - Posted February 27 2019 - 6:03 AM

noebl1

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,042 posts
  • LocationNorthern Massachusetts

They just leave their trash piled up in the nest and it's causing problems. The sponge had almost turned black with mold. I gonna have to move them soon.

 

I've had the same issues with A. fulva and A. rudis too... total slobs. My A. picea pulled an entire worm into their test tube, then left it to mold.  Hoping to get that out before I take them out of hibernation.  


  • Mettcollsuss likes this

#70 Offline Mettcollsuss - Posted March 16 2019 - 4:40 AM

Mettcollsuss

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,219 posts
  • LocationChicago, IL

med_gallery_1963_1384_2449721.jpg

 

med_gallery_1963_1384_1361079.jpg



#71 Offline Mettcollsuss - Posted April 13 2019 - 4:00 AM

Mettcollsuss

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,219 posts
  • LocationChicago, IL

Moved this journal to here







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: journal, aphaenogaster, aphaenogaster rudis, aphaenogaster cf. rudis, ant keeping

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users