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Termite habitat on kickstarter

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35 replies to this topic

#21 Offline Vendayn - Posted January 5 2015 - 12:36 PM

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I thought the rule for ants was that you can't transport queens specifically over state lines. Workers get shipped just fine. Wouldn't the same apply to termites? As far as I've read, the set only includes workers, not royals.

No, in the U.S you need a very nearly impossible to get permit to ship even worker ants, across state lines. And depending on city/county they can have their own laws. Its why you don't see more sites/people in U.S selling worker ants except just the Uncle Milton ones. The same applies to termites, and especially so because each nymph/worker can easily turn into a reproductive anyway. The law got that covered there, so there was no loophole.

 

At least that is what I was told about the termites from Myrmacophyl.


Edited by Vendayn, January 5 2015 - 12:37 PM.


#22 Offline Alza - Posted January 5 2015 - 4:22 PM

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I buy harvester ants that arent even from lil milts all the time....And the permit isn't that hard to get. You just need to contact the local fish and wild life agency x.x and its like 100$ a year and 50$ an order. 


50$ added to every order that is. 



#23 Offline Crystals - Posted January 5 2015 - 5:43 PM

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Alza, you are confusing two different permits.

 

Pogonomyrex workers are on an "allowed" list.  The permit to ship "allowed" species is quite different from the permit to ship, and keep, the non-native species that are not on that allow list.  The permit you are talking about is quite common and easy to get - pet stores use that one all the time.

 

The other permit is much more difficult to obtain, and maintain.


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#24 Offline Miles - Posted January 5 2015 - 5:45 PM

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This is very interesting, and I hope his project succeeds. Just a point I think should be made, is that many myrmecologists and entomologists as a whole are frustrated with the ineffective and illogical system that the USDA uses for insect management. 

To be unable to move worker ants across state lines is absurd, and everyone I have talked to, including some USDA agents, have agreed with that.

 

The termitat company claimed to have permits for the shipping of the "worker" termites.


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#25 Offline Gregory2455 - Posted January 5 2015 - 5:50 PM

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Nymphs look like workers too, yet they can end up turning into reproductives...



#26 Offline Miles - Posted January 5 2015 - 5:55 PM

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Nymphs look like workers too, yet they can end up turning into reproductives...

Regardless, the site claims to have a permit. This guy obviously knows what he is doing, and would know the difference between a nymph and worker.

At least this is one of the less destructive species. 


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#27 Offline Miles - Posted January 5 2015 - 8:35 PM

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I have sent the creator of the project a message detailing my and the questions that have been raised in this thread. I hope he replies and gives some answers so that we don't have to speculate.


Edited by Miles, January 5 2015 - 8:35 PM.

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#28 Offline Vendayn - Posted January 5 2015 - 9:23 PM

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Well, Dampwood termites don't actually have workers. They have no true worker caste. All of the caste can turn into reproductives. Even if they did have workers, many workers can turn into reproductives anyway across the multiple termite species.

 

Now with the legalness aside. Actually one thing does come out of this.

 

At least it gets more people into keeping and raising termites. Its kind of sad that I can count on ONE hand the amount of people I've seen actually keep termites over a period of 5 years. Termites are awesome too, and very few keep them.

 

My main concern isn't even from the legal standpoint, but how he is going to ship the termites without them dying. What if they came during the heat of Summer? How will they get water during the time they get shipped? Will the wood be soaked enough to support them during this whole process? What if they came and they were all dead? And since they'll re-produce (not IF, but WILL)...can I expand it somehow to support the bigger population? I don't want to keep returning it to get new wood. I'd rather get wood myself and expand it on my own.


Edited by Vendayn, January 5 2015 - 9:26 PM.


#29 Offline Vendayn - Posted January 5 2015 - 9:31 PM

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Now with my criticism aside...and hey, can't be too careful.

 

The species isn't invasive, nor damaging. And they are the biggest termite species in north america. So, maybe its easier to get a permit for them (like Pogonomyrmex) than it would be for others. The "workers" still turn into secondary reproductives over time.

 

However, termites are really interesting to watch. And this looks to be a great setup to watch them in. I'd keep Dampwood termites if they were found here.



#30 Offline Miles - Posted January 6 2015 - 5:55 PM

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Vendayn: I apologize for my misunderstanding of that aspect of termite biology

 

Would you like me to pass these questions on to him?


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#31 Offline Vendayn - Posted January 6 2015 - 7:02 PM

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Yeah, that would be great. :) Especially if there is a way to expand it like an ant farm. Because eventually they'll reproduce and need new wood. And doesn't seem too feasible to just keep sending it back (even if it lasts a long time).



#32 Offline Miles - Posted January 6 2015 - 7:16 PM

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I figure that if I am able to get one, which is probably not likely due to the price (which really is quite good if you consider it. That doesn't really help me given my lack of funds already), I will drill a connection hole or two so that I can allow the colony to expand when that time comes.

I figure that part of his selling point is that it is sealed. I bet 95% of people would not want there to be any openings termites could get out of. He might be able to put holes by request.


Edited by Miles, January 6 2015 - 7:19 PM.

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#33 Offline BugFinder - Posted March 28 2015 - 12:14 PM

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I really like the nest and would be happy to buy it without termites, and put my own locally captured queen inside it.  I wonder how long it would last for a colony before they would have to be moved.  The only problem I can see with it is no port to use to relocate the colony.


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#34 Offline NorthEdge - Posted March 28 2015 - 12:39 PM

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Here's the link to the official website rather than the kickstarter page. http://termitat.com/

 

 

I really like the nest and would be happy to buy it without termites, and put my own locally captured queen inside it.  I wonder how long it would last for a colony before they would have to be moved.  The only problem I can see with it is no port to use to relocate the colony.

 

I doubt this habitat would be sufficient for most native termites. Subterranean termites would require soil. It also uses a large termite species, meaning if it was suitable you may not be able to see the termites anyway because they can tunnel away from the sides. 



#35 Offline kellakk - Posted March 28 2015 - 12:53 PM

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We have Zootermopsis angusticollis here in California, which is the species that would be included in the Termitat.  I suspect it would also be suitable for drywood termites as well.


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#36 Offline Cleo - Posted March 13 2022 - 3:30 PM

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I have 2 termitats (contain Pacific dampwood termites). Received the 1st in Dec 2021 and the 2nd in Jan 2022. Id love some help with them! They have developed very differently.

The 1st arrived with about 30 termites. Five were soldiers. Within a month all the soldiers had disappeared. Next all but 7 of the remaining termites got wings, including one that was pure white. Of course, they couldn't swarm. I read that IF they couldn't swarm, they would simply lose their wings. Not what happened... they all died. Of the 7 remaining termites, one of those has disappeared. The 6 that remain seem to be fine so far. They have tried moving the winged corpses all to a couple of spots, but there are a lot of them!

The 2nd termitat came with about 50 regular termites. They're pretty hard to count accurately but all seem to be sleeping around 10:00 am (best time to count) and after having this one for 2 months, there seem to be about 30 remaining.

I have carefully followed the instructions. They are kept in a dimly lit area, watered as instructed, and are at a constant 22Β°-24Β° C.

I have discovered that they want more than just damp wood; they also want WATER. When I water them with the supplied syringe, they all rush to drink before it soaks completely into the wood.

I'd love to hear from others termitat owners. I'd also appreciate any information or tips anyone could give.

Thanks.

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Edited by Cleo, March 13 2022 - 3:43 PM.

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