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Care Sheet - Tetramorium Sp. e

tetramorium sp e

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9 replies to this topic

#1 Offline AnthonyP163 - Posted January 20 2017 - 10:34 AM

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Another one for you guys.

Scientific Name: Tetramorium Species E

Common Name: Pavement ant

Distribution: North America, maybe Europe but taxonomists aren't sure.

Queen size: 7 mm


Worker size: 1 - 3 mm


Natural Habitat: Generally anywhere, under bricks and rocks, under logs, sometimes found in logs but very uncommon.

Circadian Activity: usually Diurnal.

Mating Flight: lots of them in June, they come out after storms. They fly in the air and mate. Pretty easy to find.


Queen Founding Method: Fully Claustral

Monogyne or Polygyne: Monogyne

Average time from egg to worker: Egg to Larvae = 11 days; Larvae to pupae = 11 days, Pupae to worker = 12 days. Very fast growers.

Recommended Temperature: 70 - 78 degrees F, 21 - 25 C

Recommended Humidity: 30 - 40%, not too much but they still need some.

Preferred Foods: anything including crackers, chicken, bugs, fruit. They don't seem to like sugar water as much as honey.

Hibernation Details: 46 degrees Fahrenheit, 8 degrees Celsius.

Escape Barrier Methods: PTFE, you will need a good barrier because they are so small.

Difficulty rating: 1/10, definitely one of the easiest species to keep.

Bite and/or Sting rating: the sting might hurt a little, just don't mess with them when they are eating or anything. Overall, don't pick them up ;)

Special Care or Interesting Notes: A good species to try a first formicaria on. They're fast too. Hibernate them from November to February.

Additional Links: honestly, Antscanada taught me most of this. I found out the rest by experience.


Edited by AnthonyP163, January 21 2017 - 8:37 AM.

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#2 Offline sgheaton - Posted January 20 2017 - 11:06 AM

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I take 10/10 as the most difficult possible.

 

I'd read 1/10 as level 1 out of 10 - easy

and 10/10 as the last level - hardest.


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#3 Offline noebl1 - Posted January 20 2017 - 12:07 PM

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I take 10/10 as the most difficult possible.

 

I'd read 1/10 as level 1 out of 10 - easy

and 10/10 as the last level - hardest.

 

I interpreted the same as you.  1 out of 10 would be easiest to me.  Though the numbers realistically are pretty arbitrary :)  



#4 Offline sgheaton - Posted January 23 2017 - 6:47 AM

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Yeah... And that's the debate that goes on in my head. 'Why am I making the comment? What is going to be gained from it? Does it really matter?" 

No...I think everyone understands. It's fine and alright. Not to deliberately rock the boat with the "YOURE MISTAKEN CAUSE WE DO THINGS DIFFFERENTLY 'ROUND THESE PARTS" and all.... 

I am glad that they are easy as they are as I am holding onto one queen right now...with like.. partial interest. Its hibernation time and so I kinda forget about them. I should probably go and give them new foods. Once I break them back out I'll be upset how I still don't have a lid but am really enjoying watching them. 


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#5 Offline AnthonyP163 - Posted January 27 2017 - 6:49 AM

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I take 10/10 as the most difficult possible.

I'd read 1/10 as level 1 out of 10 - easy
and 10/10 as the last level - hardest.

I fixed it :D

I just recently took mine out, as they were put in to hibernation in the beginning of October.

Edited by AnthonyP163, January 27 2017 - 6:50 AM.


#6 Offline sgheaton - Posted January 27 2017 - 7:04 AM

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Dang, really? Already?

I checked in on mine earlier this week and they are still all huddled together. Just waiting. ..sleeping? They are just in a super-zoned-out trance for days at a time. Weirdos....I'm not planning on taking them out of hibernation until I see ants outside in Colorado. Still having snow and colds that I'm thinking its still too early for me to bring them out. 


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#7 Offline AnthonyP163 - Posted January 27 2017 - 7:19 AM

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Dang, really? Already?
I checked in on mine earlier this week and they are still all huddled together. Just waiting. ..sleeping? They are just in a super-zoned-out trance for days at a time. Weirdos....I'm not planning on taking them out of hibernation until I see ants outside in Colorado. Still having snow and colds that I'm thinking its still too early for me to bring them out.


I took mine out because they had a little over 3 months of hibernation, which is the average. One colony has taken 1 cricket and a few drops of honey. The other has taken 3 crickets and tons more honey. They went crazy with the food and swarmed, it was weird to see them like this on the first day of being taken out, I expected them to take a week or so of just sitting there. 1 hour after being put in an out world they were drinking honey though. It was awesome.
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#8 Offline ctantkeeper - Posted January 27 2017 - 9:03 AM

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I would add that they exhibit pleometrophic behavior as well as monogyne colony founding behavior. I have had lots of success when raising them in pleometrophic colonies.


Edited by ctantkeeper, January 27 2017 - 9:04 AM.


#9 Offline AnthonyP163 - Posted January 27 2017 - 9:28 AM

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Most people do not like this, as the queens have a death match almost always. The template said to keep it to Monogyne or Polygnye, probably in order to keep confusion at a low.
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#10 Offline ctantkeeper - Posted January 27 2017 - 2:41 PM

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Most people do not like this, as the queens have a death match almost always. The template said to keep it to Monogyne or Polygnye, probably in order to keep confusion at a low.

Yes, but if executed correctly, than you have a LOT to gain by doing so. Just because some people are not familiar with pleometrophic behavior in ants doesn't mean we shouldn't discuss it at all or pretend it doesn't exist. This might be why so few people discuss this way of founding colonies.


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