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Possible method for queen introduction?

queen bee introduction

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12 replies to this topic

#1 Offline CallMeCraven - Posted December 1 2016 - 4:00 PM

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Warning: This post is involves to bees but is related to ants, I promise!

 

I was doing my usual internet thing when I came across a video on introducing queen bee's to queenless colonies. The guy in the video uses a small box with one side open and mesh covering it. This container was to allow for the worker's to familiarize themselves with the queen and for the bee keeper to be able to judge the workers reactions to the queen. I was wondering if something similar (obviously with smaller mesh) could be used to gauge if ants would accept a new queen into their colony, in the cases of polygynous or parasitic species. Here is a link to the video:

 

https://www.youtube....h?v=7YTFV7B0b6k

 

I am interested in your opinions and experiences!


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#2 Offline drtrmiller - Posted December 1 2016 - 5:03 PM

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It won't work too well for ants that spray acid.

Also, colony-scent association is at least partially learned (within the first few days after eclosing), and parasitic queens have evolved overriding ones that most species do not possess.

Your best bet would be to get a degree in chemical engineering, isolate those overriding pheromones that parasitic species (or non-ant symbionts) use to infiltrate a colony, determine if there is a pattern to how they work by comparing multiple species, and then synthesizing an analog that may be applied to the queen you wish to introduce in order to recreate the effect.
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#3 Offline CallMeCraven - Posted December 1 2016 - 5:15 PM

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It won't work too well for ants that spray acid.

Also, colony-scent association is at least partially learned (within the first few days after eclosing), and parasitic queens have evolved overriding ones that most species do not possess.

Your best bet would be to get a degree in chemical engineering, isolate those overriding pheromones that parasitic species (or non-ant symbionts) use to infiltrate a colony, determine if there is a pattern to how they work by comparing multiple species, and then synthesizing an analog that may be applied to the queen you wish to introduce in order to recreate the effect.

Ah yes i forgot about those tricky acid sprayers... and the degree sounds like a worthwhile cause but i don't know how much you could make from that. Maybe if you could weaponize it and introduce economically devastating species, the military will pay for your research :D.


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Harmony with land is like harmony with a friend; you cannot cherish his right hand and chop off his left.

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#4 Offline Batspiderfish - Posted December 2 2016 - 5:11 AM

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Bees have different social rules than ants do, but I recognize the importance of bringing up any and all possibilities. :)


Edited by Batspiderfish, December 2 2016 - 5:13 AM.

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#5 Offline Serafine - Posted December 2 2016 - 6:00 AM

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Works for some ants who have multiqueen hives in the wild (Formica fusca/red wood ants, Solenopsis fugax/yellow thief ants, Paratrechina longicornis/black crazy ants, certain Messor species), doesn't work for others.

 

Even if a monogynous colony accepted the new queen (which is unlikely) it would disturb the colony to such a degree that sooner or later the workers would decide to kill one of the competing queens.


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#6 Offline CallMeCraven - Posted December 2 2016 - 8:21 AM

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Even if a monogynous colony accepted the new queen (which is unlikely) it would disturb the colony to such a degree that sooner or later the workers would decide to kill one of the competing queens.

 

 in the cases of polygynous or parasitic species. 

I would only think about trying this as a way of introducing a queen to species that can accept multiple queens. As Dr pointed out, there are a lot of other complications of this method. I definitely like the concept tho :D. I wish I had available queens of polygynous/parasitic species to give this a shot. 


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4x Camponotus (hyatti?)

 

 

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Harmony with land is like harmony with a friend; you cannot cherish his right hand and chop off his left.

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#7 Offline Goldsystem - Posted December 2 2016 - 9:49 AM

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I had collected 2 colony's of Pheidole except for one of there temporary holding bins I used baby powder as a barrier and we'll all the ants BUT the queen escaped so I introduced her to the other colony who swarmed her, I thought they were attacking her but they were aculally cleaning her and she's been living fine with the other queen for a month and a half now

#8 Offline CallMeCraven - Posted December 2 2016 - 10:26 AM

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I had collected 2 colony's of Pheidole except for one of there temporary holding bins I used baby powder as a barrier and we'll all the ants BUT the queen escaped so I introduced her to the other colony who swarmed her, I thought they were attacking her but they were aculally cleaning her and she's been living fine with the other queen for a month and a half now

That must be scary. When I saw the AntsCanada video where Mickey combined two colonies, I thought for sure the queen that was getting swarmed was dead meat. Crazy ants and their crazy pheromones.


Current Colony:

 

4x Camponotus (hyatti?)

 

 

____________________________________________________

 

Harmony with land is like harmony with a friend; you cannot cherish his right hand and chop off his left.

-Aldo Leopold


#9 Offline MichiganAnts - Posted December 15 2016 - 8:44 PM

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well if you have a queen and chill her with younger workers you can do it. also seperating them with a mesh screen could help aswell. but i feel its random chance. a guy on the AC FB page combined Camponotus with another species and they've lived together for months without issue


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#10 Offline Canadian anter - Posted December 16 2016 - 4:34 AM

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I had a Lasius claviger queen build herself a chamber near a Lasius alienus nest


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#11 Offline mantisgal - Posted July 30 2022 - 12:45 PM

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I am thinking of a variant on this method to introduce a new queen to my queenless Lasius colony (yes the one from last year, she fell out the tube during an accident). Thinking of a tube separated by some flims of cotton so it takes time for the colony to find her. Does any one have relevant knowledge?

#12 Offline AntsDakota - Posted July 30 2022 - 9:49 PM

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I am thinking of a variant on this method to introduce a new queen to my queenless Lasius colony (yes the one from last year, she fell out the tube during an accident). Thinking of a tube separated by some flims of cotton so it takes time for the colony to find her. Does any one have relevant knowledge?

If the workers actually have to find her it won’t work for that reason, since besides being learned colonies maintain their pheromones via trophallaxis and grooming. Having no interaction with the queen would do quite the opposite, and ensure their pheromones will be different. The only way this would work is by random chance as preciously mentioned. In that case, why not just throw them together right away and hope for the best? Also food for thought there has been limited documentation of colonies of polygynous or secondarily polygynous species accepting their own alates after they returned from their nuptial flight, since their pheromones would still match their parent colony at that point. Besides social parasitism that is the only natural way I’m aware of for queens to be accepted into mature colonies. Personally I am against even trying introductions unless the colony’s queen died or you have an excess of queens, due to the obvious safety hazard imposed onto the queens.
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#13 Offline mantisgal - Posted July 31 2022 - 11:42 PM

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Thanks for the info. They keep checking the queen's old chamber to see if she reincarnated so maybe putting her in there for them to find will help?

I'll let you know what happens!

Edited by mantisgal, July 31 2022 - 11:43 PM.






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