Jump to content

  • Chat
  •  
  •  

Welcome to Formiculture.com!

This is a website for anyone interested in Myrmecology and all aspects of finding, keeping, and studying ants. The site and forum are free to use. Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation points to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!

Photo

Dspdrew's Pheidole vistana Journal [85] (Updated 2-4-2024)

Pheidole vistana Dspdrew journal

153 replies to this topic

#21 Offline Gregory2455 - Posted September 1 2014 - 5:14 PM

Gregory2455

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,286 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Desert species usually have really long legs because they need to keep their bodies of the hot ground during the day.



#22 Offline Alza - Posted September 1 2014 - 5:30 PM

Alza

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 864 posts
  • LocationThe Village

i like that



#23 Offline Gregory2455 - Posted September 1 2014 - 5:32 PM

Gregory2455

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,286 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Myrmecocystus mexicanus has legs like that.



#24 Offline dspdrew - Posted September 2 2014 - 6:13 AM

dspdrew
  • LocationSanta Ana, CA

I have read that about long legs and desert species, and it makes sense to me, but there are all sorts of ant species in the desert that have short legs too, so I don't know how much that really means. For example, all other Pheidole, Acromyrmex, Cyphomyrmex, and Solenopsis all have short legs.



#25 Offline Gregory2455 - Posted September 2 2014 - 6:37 AM

Gregory2455

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,286 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

I guess it depends how sensitive they are to heat.



#26 Offline Myrmicinae - Posted September 2 2014 - 1:33 PM

Myrmicinae

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 274 posts
  • LocationFort Collins, CO
Longer legs probably also allow them to cover a greater distance in less time, something that would be useful in taking advantage of sparse resources in the desert.

I wonder if species with shorter legs forage at cooler parts of the day...
Journals on Formiculture:
Pheidole ceres
Tapinoma sessile

Old YouTube Channel:
ColoradoAnts

#27 Offline Gregory2455 - Posted September 2 2014 - 3:31 PM

Gregory2455

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,286 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

True.



#28 Offline dspdrew - Posted September 2 2014 - 3:33 PM

dspdrew
  • LocationSanta Ana, CA

I do see Acromyrmex foraging late at night, as well as Cyphomyrmex. Funny thing is this particular species of Pheidole I only see foraging at night.



#29 Offline Gregory2455 - Posted September 2 2014 - 3:36 PM

Gregory2455

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,286 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

They were soft and I think they were parasitic.

 

Mine were soft and parasitic as well... Not much difference, but mine were WAY whiter.

 

       Although.... I am not sure they were parasitic, I eliminated all of them except in the colony of the black unidentified species, which where they are multiplying.  :o


Edited by Gregory2455, September 2 2014 - 3:37 PM.


#30 Offline dspdrew - Posted September 3 2014 - 7:35 AM

dspdrew
  • LocationSanta Ana, CA

Some of these were white too, because they were very new and had not darkened yet.



#31 Offline Gregory2455 - Posted September 3 2014 - 2:04 PM

Gregory2455

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,286 posts
  • LocationCalifornia
Mine are white throughout their lives.

#32 Offline Gregory2455 - Posted September 19 2014 - 4:03 PM

Gregory2455

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,286 posts
  • LocationCalifornia
Quick ending to an ant I see you want really bad. :(


Edit: This was referring to the first colony. The second wasn't originally part of this journal.

Edited by dspdrew, November 25 2023 - 8:10 PM.
dspdrew


#33 Offline dspdrew - Posted September 19 2014 - 4:24 PM

dspdrew
  • LocationSanta Ana, CA

Yeah, I was pretty pissed. I'm glad I have P. desertorum vistana now though, they're almost exactly the same.
 
 
Edit: They were actually P. vistana and part of this journal now.


Edited by dspdrew, November 25 2023 - 8:10 PM.
dspdrew


#34 Offline Gregory2455 - Posted September 19 2014 - 4:44 PM

Gregory2455

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,286 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

Yeah, I was pretty pissed. I'm glad I have P. desertorum now though, they're almost exactly the same.

 

That is good. :) 

I think right now i would do anything for xerophilla or gilvescens, something not in the fallax group.



#35 Offline dspdrew - Posted October 2 2014 - 8:37 PM

dspdrew
  • LocationSanta Ana, CA

Update 10-2-2014
 
I've been keeping this colony's test tube in a foraging container for the last month. They for some reason are losing workers as fast as they're being produced. Today I put them in a new test tube and got rid of all the dead ones, as a lot of them had mold starting to grow on them. I actually put them in the new modified test tube I recently created to give it a test also. Now the colony has about as many workers as it did on the last update, and no more foraging container. I want to see how well they do back in just a test tube only.



#36 Offline dspdrew - Posted October 18 2014 - 10:01 AM

dspdrew
  • LocationSanta Ana, CA

Update 10-18-2014
 
After the last worker finally died last week, today queen died as well. I guess I'll have to try again next year.



#37 Offline Gregory2455 - Posted October 18 2014 - 11:26 AM

Gregory2455

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,286 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

:( Man that sucks. Fallax-group Pheidole seem harder to keep than others. 



#38 Offline dspdrew - Posted July 1 2015 - 9:15 PM

dspdrew
  • LocationSanta Ana, CA

Update 7-1-2015

 

I found three more of these queens wandering around on a dirt road in Trabuco Canyon, California around 9:00 pm.

 

The first one was found 6-9-2015, and was a dealate. It laid tons of eggs, and now has pupae that are getting close to eclosing.

 

med_gallery_2_216_188598.jpg
 
med_gallery_2_216_287063.jpg
 
 
As you can see, these have such long legs, the pupae can hardly fold up like they normally do.
 
med_gallery_2_216_161228.jpg
 
med_gallery_2_216_471769.jpg

 

The other two were found on 6-28-2015 and still had their wings.

A day or two later the alates both removed their wings and laid a small piles of eggs.

 

med_gallery_2_93_208528.jpg
 
med_gallery_2_93_60068.jpg
 
 
Hopefully I have better luck with these this time.



#39 Offline kellakk - Posted July 1 2015 - 10:41 PM

kellakk

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPip
  • 602 posts
  • LocationSouthern California

Those pupae look awesome! I understand why you like these vistana/desertorum now, I want a colony myself!


Current Species:
Pogonomyrmex montanus

 

Reticulitermes hesperus


#40 Offline dspdrew - Posted July 2 2015 - 5:04 PM

dspdrew
  • LocationSanta Ana, CA
Update 7-2-2015
 
I had no idea these were only a day away from eclosing. She now has a bunch of workers. These went from egg to worker in only three weeks!
 
med_gallery_2_216_320176.jpg
  • Myrmicinae likes this





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Pheidole vistana, Dspdrew, journal

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users