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Dspdrew's Anuroctonus pococki Scorpion


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21 replies to this topic

#1 Offline dspdrew - Posted May 19 2014 - 3:11 PM

dspdrew
  • LocationSanta Ana, CA
I dug out a mature female Anuroctonus pococki scorpion last week from its burrow in the embankment on the side of a trail. Now that I know more about this species of scorpion, I built a nice little setup that it should feel most at home in.
 
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This should allow her to dig her burrow into the side of an embankment like they are used to doing. Hopefully if I keep it dark in the back, she might dig right up against the glass allowing me to view her while in her nest.
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#2 Offline dspdrew - Posted May 20 2014 - 1:52 PM

dspdrew
  • LocationSanta Ana, CA
I put the scorpion in her new cage last night and started a small burrow for her. Right away she took over on the digging.
 
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#3 Offline Michaelofvancouver - Posted May 20 2014 - 3:48 PM

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Scorpions!?!? You're making me feel my pets are lame. Do you know if there are any safe scorpions I can keep in Vancouver?

Here's my leopard gecko/ant youtube: https://goo.gl/cRAFbK

 

My ant website.

It contains a lot of information about ants, guides, videos, links, and more!

If you have any feedback, please post here or PM me, don't be shy!

 

I currently keep:

Camponotus modoc

Formica podzolica


#4 Offline Mads - Posted May 20 2014 - 4:30 PM

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I can't remember the by laws for Vancouver, but I'm pretty sure most arachnids are not allowed, at least they were in Abbotsford when I lived there. That being said, I know many people who kept them anyways and many pet stores in the lower mainland still sell them. It's not very strictly enforced, but it is a bylaw and so they could enforce it if they chose and make you get rid of any pet arachnids you may have.

 

But, enough about that, the best choice for someone with no experience with scorpions would be something like an Emperor Scorpion, or a Flat Rock Scorpion. Both of these species get quite large and are not very venomous, and in most cases would most likely pinch you rather than sting you. If you are interested in getting scorpions I would recommend www.tarantulacanada.ca or www.arachnophiliacs.com . If you are interested in getting information on scorpions a good forum is www.arachnoboards.com .

 

Hope this helps.

 

Mads


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#5 Offline dspdrew - Posted May 20 2014 - 4:42 PM

dspdrew
  • LocationSanta Ana, CA

I think there's only a few scorpions that are very dangerous, most will just inflict a lot of pain. I know around my part of the US I think the only really dangerous one is the Bark Scorpion; that one can kill you.



#6 Offline Mads - Posted May 20 2014 - 6:43 PM

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Yes, only about 15-20 species of the 1500+ known species are considered deadly. Not sure if any of the North American species are considered deadly or not. Of course, if you're allergic then any sting would be considered deadly. Rule of thumb is, if you're allergic to bees then chances are you'll have an adverse reaction to scorpion/spider venom as well (or at least a higher chance of complications).

 

Mads



#7 Offline Cole - Posted May 21 2014 - 1:42 PM

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What do you feed that thing? What's that orange stuff in the dish?



#8 Offline dspdrew - Posted May 21 2014 - 3:06 PM

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  • LocationSanta Ana, CA

I feed them crickets. The orange stuff is a sea sponge, it makes it easy for critters to drink without drowning.



#9 Offline Cole - Posted May 21 2014 - 3:17 PM

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Cool stuff. How did you capture her? I'd be so afraid of getting stung.



#10 Offline dspdrew - Posted May 21 2014 - 6:57 PM

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  • LocationSanta Ana, CA

Just corralled her into a container with the lid.



#11 Offline dspdrew - Posted May 21 2014 - 11:24 PM

dspdrew
  • LocationSanta Ana, CA
She has dug her borrow about five or more inches deep by now. There's getting to be a pretty large pile of dirt outside the hole.
 
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She doesn't come out very often while doing her digging, but I did manage to catch her once on video.
 

 
 
This is how they like to sit at night waiting for dinner to come walking by.
 
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#12 Offline dspdrew - Posted May 24 2014 - 9:33 PM

dspdrew
  • LocationSanta Ana, CA
It looks like she has dug her burrow as deep as it's gonna get.
 
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#13 Offline Gregory2455 - Posted October 18 2014 - 9:36 PM

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Just corralled her into a container with the lid.

Use you alligator forceps!!!!!!! :P



#14 Offline kellakk - Posted December 11 2014 - 1:39 PM

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Use you alligator forceps!!!!!!! :P

 

Or use your hands. These scorpions aren't prone to sting, although they make an impressive threat display.  Even a sting is not very painful, ants would hurt more (speaking from experience here).


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Current Species:
Novomessor cockerelli (2), Brachymyrmex patagonicus (1)Veromessor pergandei (1?), Dorymyrmex bureni (1)


#15 Offline dspdrew - Posted December 12 2014 - 2:54 PM

dspdrew
  • LocationSanta Ana, CA

Or use your hands. These scorpions aren't prone to sting, although they make an impressive threat display.  Even a sting is not very painful, ants would hurt more (speaking from experience here).

Wow. I always thought it would be a horribly painful sting.



#16 Offline kellakk - Posted December 13 2014 - 3:36 PM

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Wow. I always thought it would be a horribly painful sting.

 

Of the scorpions commonly found here in Orange County, A. pococki has the least painful.  The other scorpions found here are more painful, but overall it's equivalent to a bee sting. Nothing deadly here, thankfully.


Current Species:
Novomessor cockerelli (2), Brachymyrmex patagonicus (1)Veromessor pergandei (1?), Dorymyrmex bureni (1)


#17 Offline William. T - Posted January 3 2015 - 6:50 PM

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Crickets are not the best feeders. Crickets are known to bite molting inverts and shedding herps if they are hungry enough. Nice setup. Best put an obstacle in the middle so the scorpion will have to burrow against the glass. Your scorp has dug against the glass, but best put something in the sand. Plus, the scorpion, like Hairy Desert Scorpions, will probably drag food inside the burrow, so you might want to put in a blue feigning death beetles inside. You can get those from Bugsincyberspace to act as janitors. They make a sound that deters the scorpion, or they can play dead. Emperors are good starter scorpions, but the "red claw" emperors are not. They are very aggressive different species! Never buy the tiny yellow scorpions form the Mid East or Northern Africa. You might be buying a Death Stalker or a Fat Tail! Very dangerous. Best of the luck! :)


Species I keep:

 

1 Lasius cf. Neoniger 30 workers

1 Camponotus sp. 15 workers

20 Tetramorium SpE 30 workers

1 T. Sessile 200 workers

 


#18 Offline dspdrew - Posted September 5 2016 - 2:32 AM

dspdrew
  • LocationSanta Ana, CA
This scorpion must have been old. It started falling apart. It's stinger broke completely off at one point. I finally hadn't seen it come out of its burro in a few weeks, so I checked to see if it was still alive, and it wasn't. It finally died. I might get another one, or I might just use its tank for my new scorpion--Hadrurus arizonensis (https://www.formicul...rus-arizonensis).

#19 Offline Salmon - Posted September 5 2016 - 10:44 AM

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So how did you make that setup? You packed damp clayey soil into shape, tilted the tank, and dried it with a fan?

#20 Offline dspdrew - Posted September 5 2016 - 10:54 AM

dspdrew
  • LocationSanta Ana, CA

I just poured the wet mud into the tank while it sits at an angle and waited for it to harden.






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