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San Antonio, Texas

wanted queen san antonio texas

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14 replies to this topic

#1 Offline Archer - Posted July 9 2016 - 8:05 AM

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I've recently been gearing up to start my own colony now that I have that ant itch. I have been reading up that finding a queen shouldn't be to hard during these Spring/Summer months, but I have had no luck so far. Am I too late for this year? Perhaps others in the area have one to sell?

Thank you!

 



#2 Offline Kingjay - Posted July 9 2016 - 11:01 AM

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nice I don't think it's to late.Just keep something on you at all times, and look after it rain or after a really bad thunderstorm
I hope that you get a queen soon.Good luck
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#3 Offline EstuaryAnts - Posted July 9 2016 - 11:28 AM

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Actually this is the peak of the ant season so keep looking! What works for me is to go on like mini expedition's looking for queens right after some nice rain.


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#4 Offline Bryansant - Posted July 10 2016 - 10:01 AM

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I've found Solenopsis and Camponotus on sidewalks and parking lots after rains usually along the edge, following the base of the curb. Pools are a good place to look after a rain - some will still be alive.

After our last Texas weather front ran through I went to a nearby park and looked under rocks and downed branches. It was so muggy - I was drenched in sweat! I didn't find any living queens, only wandering males, until a bug flew right into my sweaty forehead and stuck and when I wiped it off there was a Solenopsis queen on the back of my hand!

Same day, at a different park, I found three Solenopsis queens along the soil buildup at the edge of a parking lot and saw freshly dug holes from potentially more queens. Another male alate landed on my windshield while I was on the phone inside and then another, very small, bright orange alate alighted on my windshield for a couple seconds. Pretty sure it was a female but it was so small and I wasn't quick enough to scoop her up. Moist parks after a storm really are a good anting trove.

Previous storm to that one I went to another nearby park. Found a small, established Crematogaster colony inside a small rotting branch. I pushed the branch apart and eventually found the queen and started collecting. Only, I noticed she had a mite or some other critter attached to her thorax and decided not to bring her home. And one of her workers started viciously attacking her - probably all the painted defensive chemicals. Still want one of these colonies!! Not too far down the same trail I found a solitary Camponotus queen under a rock.

Also saw some small ants hanging out on/in my cactus pot so I took it apart the pot and now have a neat Brachymyrmex colony.

I'll let you know if I find any more. I'm in Austin so it's a relatively short drive.

Do you already have a formicarium set up?
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#5 Offline Bryansant - Posted July 10 2016 - 10:04 AM

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Are you looking for a specific size or genus?

#6 Offline Bryansant - Posted July 10 2016 - 10:09 AM

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I'm pretty sure there's another Brachymyrmex colony in another cactus pot on my balcony and I could possibly extract it for you. Just know they are super tiny. See my ID post: http://www.formicult...016/#entry36797

#7 Offline Archer - Posted July 10 2016 - 12:46 PM

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Hi Guys!

Thank you very much for the input. I am excited, and have all the tools ready. I few snap caps bottles for capture and sterile test tubes ready to go. Its been a while since the last rain here, so I eagerly awaiting the next shower. There is a neighbourhood park not too far away and down the block from there a large swimming pool that I will be walking around :)

 

Bryansant, thank you very much for the offer. I want give the communities tips a try first and see what happens, but I may end up asking some stupid questions down the line :/ Thank you all, and Ill keep everyone updated!



#8 Offline Batspiderfish - Posted July 10 2016 - 2:04 PM

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July, in Texas, seems to be a good month for Dorymyrmex, Crematogaster, Pogonomyrmex, Solenopsis, and Camponotus:)


If you've enjoyed using my expertise and identifications, please do not create undue ecological risk by releasing your ants. The environment which we keep our pet insects is alien and oftentimes unsanitary, so ensure that wild populations stay safe by giving your ants the best care you can manage for the rest of their lives, as we must do with any other pet.

 

Exotic ants are for those who think that vibrant diversity is something you need to pay money to see. It is illegal to transport live ants across state lines.

 

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Black lives still matter.


#9 Offline EstuaryAnts - Posted July 10 2016 - 3:37 PM

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Well today I saw some trachymymrex alates near the opening hole of a nest so I'm guessing they're gonna fly soon. I find that they tend to fly when its dry and actually avoid days where other ants might find it suitable to fly.



#10 Offline Bryansant - Posted July 13 2016 - 7:07 PM

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I was reading through some of dspdrew's anting journals and it sounds like a few of his California species fly when humidity is high and not just after rains. Perhaps that's fairly common and something to look for when anticipating flights, as EstuaryAnts has observed. 



#11 Offline Archer - Posted August 12 2016 - 9:49 AM

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Hi all!

 

So it did rain about 3 weeks ago I want to say, where I caught this ant with a male still attached to it. I placed it in a test tube set up, and about a day later, the male detached it self. I waited for it to die, but it never did. On day 4 or 5 the female detached her wings. Gave it another day, and used a q-tip to remove the male and wings. Fast forward to today, and I took this pic.

 

I suspect this is a Lasius species, however I am uncertain which exact one. She is small! (2mm or 3mm) Smaller than I expected a queen to be but after taking the photo, I understand a bit better. I am wondering if she will get bigger with time. I know she laid some eggs, but couldn't really tell what stage they were in until I snapped this shot too.

 

20160812_114027.png

 

I plan on making some videos, and will post them too. Once I can confirm the species, Ill move this over to a Journal :D (Would love a bit of help in the identification  area if possible ;)

 

--..Archer.



#12 Offline Saftron - Posted August 12 2016 - 10:12 AM

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I believe that's Monomorium sp.? possibly Dilopomyrmex? I'm guessing but that's what it looks like to me. Definately not Lasius. 

 

Also there are eggs and some larvae in that picture if that helps.



#13 Offline kellakk - Posted August 12 2016 - 12:22 PM

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I think your queen is Brachymyrmex patagonicus. They're common here in central/east Texas.


Current Species:
Pogonomyrmex montanus

 

Reticulitermes hesperus


#14 Offline Archer - Posted August 25 2016 - 3:18 PM

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Thank you for the suggestion! I've been pouring over google images and I must say... my eyes hurt lol It's really difficult for me learning about variations in ants physical differences, being this is a new hobby for me :thinking:

 

Oh in the last day or two, I started seeing some black specs, that I thought could be mold. So I took this pic.

 

queeny_babies.jpg

 

Turns out it's babies!!

 

--..Archer


Edited by Archer, August 25 2016 - 3:18 PM.


#15 Offline kellakk - Posted August 25 2016 - 3:36 PM

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Congrats! I've found them to be a fun and easy species to keep. If you make sure the workers are topped up on sugars and give them access to soft-bodied insects, the colony will grow extremely fast.


Current Species:
Pogonomyrmex montanus

 

Reticulitermes hesperus






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