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Ants won't move to new test tube


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8 replies to this topic

#1 Offline Antzy - Posted September 21 2022 - 11:57 PM

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Hi

 

Asked another question recently about why my colony is slowing down, and it appears they are getting reaady for hibernation, which led me to the following concern. The tube definately does not have enough water in it to last until March time, I'd give it until January at best. Also there is a small amount of black mold in there,

 

I've followed all the tips and added a new tube, uncovered the current one, ensured the new one is very dark. Despite the fact the light clearly bothers them (when i move it to the window, so sunlight hits them, they grab their brood and try to cram it into a shaded corner under the cotton), they have nade no attempt to move, its been 4 days now.

 

What is the risks of them not moving, and them going into hibernation in a tube that runs out of water mid winter?
 

Also - a side question. Will their current brood all hatch, despite hibernation? There is at least 10 cocoons, and 15 larvae and some eggs.... I find it weird they are refusing all insects i give them, despite them havig plenty of larvae

 

Cheers 



#2 Offline dspdrew - Posted September 22 2022 - 12:54 AM

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Just move them forcefully. They'll get over it. I move colonies almost every day.


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#3 Offline T.C. - Posted September 22 2022 - 1:04 AM

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Also - a side question. Will their current brood all hatch, despite hibernation? There is at least 10 cocoons, and 15 larvae and some eggs.... I find it weird they are refusing all insects i give them, despite them havig plenty of larvae

 

Cheers 

 

The species and your location is a contributing factor in this answer. However typically I wait until their is no cocoons or pupae to hibernate. It is normal for colonies to refuse food before hibernation.


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#4 Offline ANTdrew - Posted September 22 2022 - 1:58 AM

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Hold the old tube right up to the new tube and flick it hard until you knock all the ants into the new tube.
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#5 Offline Ants_Dakota - Posted September 22 2022 - 5:38 AM

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Just move them forcefully. They'll get over it. I move colonies almost every day.

How many species do you keep drew?


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#6 Offline antsriondel - Posted September 22 2022 - 7:33 AM

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Yeah, just dump the colony in a box with a barrier ( flour, baby powder and rubbing alcohol, olive oil, etc) and put a new test tube in the box. Then wait.



#7 Offline dspdrew - Posted September 22 2022 - 9:53 PM

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Just move them forcefully. They'll get over it. I move colonies almost every day.

How many species do you keep drew?

 

 

https://www.formicul...he-forum/?p=920


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#8 Offline Serafine - Posted September 23 2022 - 2:38 AM

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Hi

 

Asked another question recently about why my colony is slowing down, and it appears they are getting reaady for hibernation, which led me to the following concern. The tube definately does not have enough water in it to last until March time, I'd give it until January at best. Also there is a small amount of black mold in there,

 

I've followed all the tips and added a new tube, uncovered the current one, ensured the new one is very dark. Despite the fact the light clearly bothers them (when i move it to the window, so sunlight hits them, they grab their brood and try to cram it into a shaded corner under the cotton), they have nade no attempt to move, its been 4 days now.

 

What is the risks of them not moving, and them going into hibernation in a tube that runs out of water mid winter?
 

Also - a side question. Will their current brood all hatch, despite hibernation? There is at least 10 cocoons, and 15 larvae and some eggs.... I find it weird they are refusing all insects i give them, despite them havig plenty of larvae

 

Cheers 

They are in pre-hiberation, the cocoons and eggs will still hatch but the larvae will not pupate anymore.

Cocoons do not survive hibernation so wait for them to develop into workers, larvae will survive, eggs may (but those should have hatched by the time the cocoons are gone).

They will probably not move on their own and i'd strongly advice against just dumping them into a box. Instead carefully dip them into a fresh tube like Drew said (put a box below so any ants that miss the tube can be collected with a small brush and put into the new tube later).

 

Depending on where your ants are from and at which temperature they hibernate you might be able to relocate them during winter. Some years ago I had to rehome my Camponotus barbaricus in January but it wasn't a problem because those are mediterranean ants, they "hibernate" at around 15-18°C and never become immobile like northern species do. They just walked into the new dark tube when i put their smaller tube inside the bigger one and exposed it to light.


Edited by Serafine, September 23 2022 - 2:43 AM.

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#9 Offline ExponentMars - Posted September 27 2022 - 2:59 PM

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Hold the old tube right up to the new tube and flick it hard until you knock all the ants into the new tube.

I find this only works for larger ants that aren't as good at climbing 


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