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Ant queens won't budge to move from their old test tubes to new ones

testtube moving

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#1 Offline ArsArs - Posted August 16 2022 - 12:12 PM

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I want to move these two queens to new test tubes since the old ones are almost out of water and starting to show signs of mold, also I've made a couple of mistakes while making the old ones and now the seeds I put there not knowing lasius niger won't eat them are starting to grow:(. I have put them in a transparent container and put some special red foil around the new tubes. I've also put a light source shining directly at the old nest tube, and yet the queens still don't seem to want to move. What can I do to make them want to move ? What is the probability of them moving eventually ? I cannot dump them out from the old tubes to the new ones, because a lot of the eggs and cocoons is attached to the cotton, and i don't want to dump the plant seeds with the rest :(. Both of the queens moved to the new shady tubes for about 5min, sat there and came back to the old one with the light shining on them. They are not moving now.

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#2 Offline ANTdrew - Posted August 16 2022 - 12:29 PM

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Put the tubes in direct sunlight while keeping the new tube totally dark. Monitor carefully to avoid baking your ants.
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#3 Offline ArsArs - Posted August 16 2022 - 1:25 PM

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Put the tubes in direct sunlight while keeping the new tube totally dark. Monitor carefully to avoid baking your ants.

How would I know if I am baking them or not ? What are the signs I should put them back to shade ?



#4 Offline Serafine - Posted August 16 2022 - 3:45 PM

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Uh, those tubes should last at least for another 4 weeks (yes, even the one that's really low on water) and the amount of mold is perfectly fine (my Myrmica's tube looked a lot worse before they moved out).

 

I'd recommend waiting for first workers (plus maybe 2-3 days) and then trying again, the queens likely will not move on their own.


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#5 Offline Manitobant - Posted August 16 2022 - 9:22 PM

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I’d just dump them into the new tube. Many ant species are extremely stubborn and would rather die than move.
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#6 Offline ZTYguy - Posted August 17 2022 - 12:24 AM

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As Manitobant said if they don’t move then just give them the good ol’ tap n’ dump. It works every time and as long as you let them chill out after it, it will be all alright. Ants are resilient little critters, a little shaking won’t do much unless we’re talking myrmecocystus repletes, in that case if you look at one wrong it might die from the embarrassment.


Edited by ZTYguy, August 17 2022 - 12:24 AM.

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Ant Keeping Since June 2018
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#7 Offline AntsTopia - Posted August 17 2022 - 2:54 AM

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Yes I move almost all my colonies either by dumping them into a AC out world or Tarheel mini hearth or just a regular testube.
The good ol' tap n' dump does not work with many different fragile and scared species. You can't do that with fire ants either.
They'll uh sting you on their way down.

Keeper of no ants currently. Recently moved out of a state. Don’t worry I’ll me back in no time with hundreds of colonies. I hope.  :*(


#8 Offline ArsArs - Posted August 17 2022 - 8:39 AM

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Thanks everyone for the tips.  Update: the queen from the tube with less water and more mold luckily decided to move and carried all her eggs to the new one, and i successfully sealed her off in the new test tube. However the second one does not want to move at all. From what Serafine said I decided to let her be in her old test tube and wait for nanitics. After that i will move them by either trying the same tactic with light, or by how many of you guys advised by tapping and dumping them to the new one. Cheers everybody !







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