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How do ergatoid queens mate?

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#1 Offline CatsnAnts - Posted July 10 2021 - 8:52 AM

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I recently found some Myrmecina americana colonies in a small cluster (built still separate from each other), and noticed that only one colony had a true dealate queen, while the rest had ergatoid queens. I’m assuming that the other colonies with ergatoid queens were founded by fission from the colony with the true dealate queen. If so, how exactly did these ergatoid queens go about mating since they can’t join in on a nuptial flight? Do they simply mate in the nest? And would that mean that these colonies could produce more mated ergatoid queens on its own? I read all the ant wiki stuff and found a few other sources, but I can’t get a solid answer to this.

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#2 Offline Antkeeper01 - Posted July 10 2021 - 1:22 PM

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I recently found some Myrmecina americana colonies in a small cluster (built still separate from each other), and noticed that only one colony had a true dealate queen, while the rest had ergatoid queens. I’m assuming that the other colonies with ergatoid queens were founded by fission from the colony with the true dealate queen. If so, how exactly did these ergatoid queens go about mating since they can’t join in on a nuptial flight? Do they simply mate in the nest? And would that mean that these colonies could produce more mated ergatoid queens on its own? I read all the ant wiki stuff and found a few other sources, but I can’t get a solid answer to this.

I've heard they mate in the nest with males that are from other colonies, and then take a portion of the colony they are from


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#3 Offline Manitobant - Posted July 10 2021 - 5:55 PM

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I recently found some Myrmecina americana colonies in a small cluster (built still separate from each other), and noticed that only one colony had a true dealate queen, while the rest had ergatoid queens. I’m assuming that the other colonies with ergatoid queens were founded by fission from the colony with the true dealate queen. If so, how exactly did these ergatoid queens go about mating since they can’t join in on a nuptial flight? Do they simply mate in the nest? And would that mean that these colonies could produce more mated ergatoid queens on its own? I read all the ant wiki stuff and found a few other sources, but I can’t get a solid answer to this.

I've heard they mate in the nest with males that are from other colonies, and then take a portion of the colony they are from
yes, this is called colony fission, and is how most ergatoid queens reproduce. Honeybees and army ants also use this method.

Edited by Manitobant, July 10 2021 - 6:01 PM.

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