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Suspected Fertile Queen ID

queen identification id

Best Answer Aaron567 , June 17 2021 - 7:49 AM

Invasive Solenopsis, probably the hybrid species Solenopsis invicta richteri given your more northern location. The hybrids dominate that area.

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#1 Offline hestoncv - Posted June 17 2021 - 6:06 AM

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I recently got an interest in ant keeping and realized to start a colony I needed a queen, and it seems to be the perfect time because of all the flying ants out. I caught what I think is a queen without her wings on a float in the pool. Can someone help me ID it and tell me if I am wrong about it being a queen? Thank you so much, penny for size comparison, and I live in North-east Mississippi, United States.Attached File  QueenAnt1.jpg   199.38KB   4 downloadsAttached File  QueenAnt2.jpg   247.62KB   4 downloads



#2 Offline hestoncv - Posted June 17 2021 - 6:16 AM

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Also, how long until eggs start showing up? Thank you, happy to join the community



#3 Offline Kaelwizard - Posted June 17 2021 - 7:46 AM

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It is a queen, not sure on species. And to answer your new question, that depends on the individual and how stressed out they are and how good the conditions are.



#4 Offline Aaron567 - Posted June 17 2021 - 7:49 AM   Best Answer

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Invasive Solenopsis, probably the hybrid species Solenopsis invicta richteri given your more northern location. The hybrids dominate that area.


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#5 Offline Mettcollsuss - Posted June 17 2021 - 8:37 AM

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Seconding Solenopsis invicta x richteri



#6 Offline TennesseeAnts - Posted June 17 2021 - 8:40 AM

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I agree with Aaron, Solenopsis invicta x richteri.



#7 Offline hestoncv - Posted June 17 2021 - 10:57 AM

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Invasive Solenopsis, probably the hybrid species Solenopsis invicta richteri given your more northern location. The hybrids dominate that area.

 Yall are awesome thanks! Can you tell me what made you choose such a specific species? From what I'm reading that's a fire ant and they have a reddish hue, this one seems much darker.



#8 Offline hestoncv - Posted June 17 2021 - 10:58 AM

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Seconding Solenopsis invicta x richteri

 

 

I agree with Aaron, Solenopsis invicta x richteri.

 

Crazy yall can pick it out like that



#9 Offline Mettcollsuss - Posted June 17 2021 - 11:40 AM

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 Yall are awesome thanks! Can you tell me what made you choose such a specific species? From what I'm reading that's a fire ant and they have a reddish hue, this one seems much darker.

Solenopsis richteri is a species similar to S. invicta, except it's black rather than red. When S. richteri was introduced to the US it hybridized with S. invicta. This hybrid is now found in Tennessee, the northern halves of Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia, and the eastern bit of Arkansas. Within the areas that it occurs it's pretty common.

 

The hybrid is pretty recognizable since it's a lot darker than normal invicta, and workers (especially majors) often have large orange spots on the front of the gaster. This darker color and orange spots also applies to regular non-hybridized richteri, but it's still safe to say that this is the hybrid. This is because pure richteri barely exists in the US anymore, if at all, due to them all hybridizing with the usually more abundant S. invicta.


Edited by Mettcollsuss, June 17 2021 - 11:42 AM.

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#10 Offline Idontexist - Posted June 17 2021 - 1:27 PM

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that is a queen. Look at the thorax and the kim kardashian world class buttocks
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#11 Offline hestoncv - Posted June 17 2021 - 1:37 PM

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 Yall are awesome thanks! Can you tell me what made you choose such a specific species? From what I'm reading that's a fire ant and they have a reddish hue, this one seems much darker.

Solenopsis richteri is a species similar to S. invicta, except it's black rather than red. When S. richteri was introduced to the US it hybridized with S. invicta. This hybrid is now found in Tennessee, the northern halves of Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia, and the eastern bit of Arkansas. Within the areas that it occurs it's pretty common.

 

The hybrid is pretty recognizable since it's a lot darker than normal invicta, and workers (especially majors) often have large orange spots on the front of the gaster. This darker color and orange spots also applies to regular non-hybridized richteri, but it's still safe to say that this is the hybrid. This is because pure richteri barely exists in the US anymore, if at all, due to them all hybridizing with the usually more abundant S. invicta.

 

Love it, you know your [censored]. That reply instantly convinced me, I've also noticed ants with the orange spots. Thank you



#12 Offline PurdueEntomology - Posted June 17 2021 - 2:41 PM

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There is no guarantee that just from the general area given it is the invicta x richteri hybrid, but never the less it is Solenopsis invicta or richteri...I personally looking at the images given and their quality would go with richteri.  


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