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Myrmica sp.? Jasper, IN - 10-17-2020


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6 replies to this topic

#1 Offline CatsnAnts - Posted October 17 2020 - 6:30 AM

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I caught both of these queens on October 8th during the daylight hours of the evening. They are 7 mm long and I think they are Myrmica?

 

 

IMG 7843
IMG 7844
IMG 7849
IMG 7850

 

 

 

Care tips are also appreciated.

 

Edit: it also appears as though one queen has mites, shucks.


Edited by CatsnAnts, October 17 2020 - 6:31 AM.

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#2 Offline AntsDakota - Posted October 17 2020 - 7:15 AM

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Definitely Myrmica, although I cannot go any further than that. They look similar to mine, however I'm not even sure what they are. They have 4 queens btw. 

 

Also, I have founded a Discord Server. Would you be interested in joining? Link in my signature. 


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"God made..... all the creatures that move along the ground according to their kinds. (including ants) And God saw that it was good. Genesis 1:25 NIV version

 

Join our fledgling but growing AntsDakota Discord community! https://discord.gg/vkwjYzz

 

We're also excited about our new rising franchise: AntsDakota.com
 


#3 Online Manitobant - Posted October 17 2020 - 8:11 AM

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Myrmica are one of the hardest genera to definitively ID because of the amount of undescribed species and the similarities between species. You would probably need a microscope.
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Colony wish list:

Lasius latipes
Temnothorax pilagens
Temnothorax Americanus
Myrmica semiparasitica
Any formica microgyna group sp.

#4 Offline ponerinecat - Posted October 17 2020 - 8:54 AM

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Considering the quality of these photos microscope examination would not be necessary(although preferable), even more so if you want to keep these alive. I'm not able to help but you could try taking pics of different angles and follow a key of your region to get a basic idea of who they are.


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#5 Offline AnthonyP163 - Posted October 17 2020 - 9:55 AM

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Do you live in an area with a high sand content?

 

Myrmica spatulata complex is often dominating sandy prairies here in WI, and I found a bunch of queens this fall as well. There's many options, and we surely cannot make a definite ID based solely on soil makeup, but it could be relevant. 


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#6 Offline CatsnAnts - Posted October 17 2020 - 10:02 AM

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Do you live in an area with a high sand content?

 

Myrmica spatulata complex is often dominating sandy prairies here in WI, and I found a bunch of queens this fall as well. There's many options, and we surely cannot make a definite ID based solely on soil makeup, but it could be relevant.

The general area around where I live is dominated by clay soils, however, we do have a patch in our yard that is particularly sandy (and even more of a coincidence that I found these queens there).


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#7 Online CheetoLord02 - Posted October 18 2020 - 5:56 AM

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These queens do bare a striking resemblance to Myrmica spatulata. You're lucky if they are, because in my opinion M. spatulata are the best Myrmica species in North America.


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pizap (4)

 

 





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