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San Diego Camponotus festinatus group ID


27 replies to this topic

#21 Offline M_Ants - Posted July 31 2020 - 4:10 PM

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I might be able to get microscope pics.


Solenopsis molesta- a bunch

Solenopsis xyloni- 2 queens with brood

Pogonomyrmex californicus-2 

Pheidole sp. 1 (1)

Pheidole sp. 2 (10ish)

Veromessor pergandei- 3 queens 5 workers and brood

Veromessor andrei-4 queens

 


#22 Offline gcsnelling - Posted August 1 2020 - 5:28 AM

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Since it seems as if you may have access to a microscope I would very strongly suggest that you get a hold of a copy of the recent revision of the Camponotus festinatus group and learn a bit of ant taxonomy. Even without a scope there is a good bit of useful information in it that would be helpful.


Edited by gcsnelling, August 1 2020 - 5:29 AM.


#23 Offline YsTheAnt - Posted August 3 2020 - 7:41 AM

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In terms of distribution I was going off of this reference from AntWiki:

Westernmost records of C. festinatus are from central Arizona: Maricopa Co. (Mazatzal Mts.), Pinal Co. (Queen Creek Canyon) and Yavapai Co. (Lynx Lake).

Assuming this description (2006) still holds true I think it is either C. fragilis or C. absquatulator. The former is more often collected in SoCal so that would be my guess but you would have to get up close pictures of the head, clear enough to count hairs to get a solid ID.

#24 Offline sirjordanncurtis - Posted August 3 2020 - 8:30 AM

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https://pdfs.semanti...2819f8693c0.pdf

 

Above is a key used to identify the differences between festinatus, absquatulator, and fragilis. It points out that "Separation of C. festinatus and C. fragilis is no easy matter as the two are distressingly similar in virtually every feature." However, C. festinatus are definitely larger than both fragilis and absquatulator. You can determine whether it's fragilis or absquatulator by getting closeup or perhaps microscope pictures of the area in-between the antennal scapes. 



#25 Offline B_rad0806 - Posted August 3 2020 - 12:34 PM

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This is Fragilis. Festinatus is not in CA

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#26 Offline M_Ants - Posted August 4 2020 - 7:44 PM

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It has an egg!


Solenopsis molesta- a bunch

Solenopsis xyloni- 2 queens with brood

Pogonomyrmex californicus-2 

Pheidole sp. 1 (1)

Pheidole sp. 2 (10ish)

Veromessor pergandei- 3 queens 5 workers and brood

Veromessor andrei-4 queens

 


#27 Offline dspdrew - Posted August 4 2020 - 9:25 PM

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In terms of distribution I was going off of this reference from AntWiki:

Westernmost records of C. festinatus are from central Arizona: Maricopa Co. (Mazatzal Mts.), Pinal Co. (Queen Creek Canyon) and Yavapai Co. (Lynx Lake).

Assuming this description (2006) still holds true I think it is either C. fragilis or C. absquatulator. The former is more often collected in SoCal so that would be my guess but you would have to get up close pictures of the head, clear enough to count hairs to get a solid ID.

 

I read a lot about these a few years ago, and I can't remember if C. fragilis was more common or not, but it would certainly seem so since that always seems to be the assumed ID. From what I remember, the only way to tell the different between C. fragilis and C. absquatulator was to examine their hairs under a microscope.



#28 Offline M_Ants - Posted August 5 2020 - 8:23 PM

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Would a male work? Don't want to kill a queen to get an id.


Edited by M_Ants, August 5 2020 - 8:23 PM.

Solenopsis molesta- a bunch

Solenopsis xyloni- 2 queens with brood

Pogonomyrmex californicus-2 

Pheidole sp. 1 (1)

Pheidole sp. 2 (10ish)

Veromessor pergandei- 3 queens 5 workers and brood

Veromessor andrei-4 queens

 





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