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Lasius emarginatus in NA (NYC) - flight sightings?

lasius north america naturalized invasive nuptial flights

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#1 Offline kdel - Posted June 4 2020 - 4:16 PM

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Hi all, Lasius emarginatus is widespread throughout Europe, but received a lot of media attention starting ~5 years ago for its appearance on Manhattan island in NYC. Much of the media coverage of course misrepresented the scientific information, and purported it to be a new, unique species to Manhattan and gave it several cute nicknames like the "Manhattant". It is not a unique species but the real hype was that it was a newly discovered in NA within NYC, and within a few years of its first reports it became one of the most common species in the city.

 

As a working gardener in NYC, I encounter this species daily. I love them. They are full of energy, are speedy, and have a distinct look of a red midsection with black gaster and head. I've even noticed they have crossed the rivers and are quite common in other boroughs of NYC. But unfortunately most of the online resources I have found have very little information on this species. I would really really love to start a colony of theirs. As far as I know I haven't seen any queens/alates, even though I encounter workers as often as Tetramorium sp. in the concrete jungle. 

 

Does any one in NYC, other parts of NA, or in their native Europe have any personal experience with this species? They have so much energy and from what I've observed of the colonies that I've unfortunately had to massively disturb, they are fast growing. As a newly naturalized species, I'll report any flights that I do find from them. Perhaps their mating reflects similar to other Lasius sp? I am a new anter, so would love any insight on that. Thanks!


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#2 Offline ANTdrew - Posted June 4 2020 - 4:33 PM

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That’s really interesting; I had no idea about this. I think your best bet would be to mark and observe some nests near you later in the summer to see when alates start appearing. I think most Lasius fly later in summer or very early in the fall.
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"The ants are a people not strong, yet they prepare their meat in the summer." Prov. 30:25
Keep ordinary ants in extraordinary ways.

#3 Offline ANTdrew - Posted June 4 2020 - 5:18 PM

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https://www.bwars.co...ius-emarginatus

This article says their flights happen in late July-August in England.
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"The ants are a people not strong, yet they prepare their meat in the summer." Prov. 30:25
Keep ordinary ants in extraordinary ways.

#4 Offline kdel - Posted June 5 2020 - 2:58 PM

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https://www.bwars.co...ius-emarginatus

This article says their flights happen in late July-August in England.

Thanks for this, I wasn't aware of this site yet. Thanks for showing me a new source!



#5 Offline AntsDakota - Posted June 5 2020 - 3:08 PM

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It seems to be focused more on bees and wasps, however. That’s probably why Some of us haven’t heard of it before.
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"God made..... all the creatures that move along the ground according to their kinds. (including ants) And God saw that it was good. Genesis 1:25 NIV version


#6 Offline kdel - Posted June 5 2020 - 3:34 PM

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That’s really interesting; I had no idea about this. I think your best bet would be to mark and observe some nests near you later in the summer to see when alates start appearing. I think most Lasius fly later in summer or very early in the fall.

Thanks for your interest. I did collect this girl today in a yard populated mostly by L. emarginatus. I am new to IDing ants, but I thought she had some similarities to some Lasius sp. queens' images that I've found.  Found her wandering around noon. She's only about 10-25% longer than the average emarginatus worker I've observed. I see it would be early for most Lasius sp. to fly, and early for emarginatus to fly in England, but they are a bit farther north than NY. Wish I had some measurements, or could figure how to upload a mov. file to this site's gallery. But was wondering if you or anyone else had thoughts on an ID for her? 
IMG 3465


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#7 Offline AntsDakota - Posted June 5 2020 - 3:42 PM

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Looks like Nylanderia sp.
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"God made..... all the creatures that move along the ground according to their kinds. (including ants) And God saw that it was good. Genesis 1:25 NIV version


#8 Offline kdel - Posted June 5 2020 - 4:00 PM

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Looks like Nylanderia sp.

Thanks, based on scale and the info I have found for Nylanderia sp., this might make sense. She is on the smaller side. 


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Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: lasius, north america, naturalized, invasive, nuptial flights

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