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ID help 3 different species

id request

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6 replies to this topic

#1 Offline Vern530 - Posted January 19 2020 - 1:35 PM

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1. Location (on a map) of collection: Gridley ca
2. Date of collection: 1-19-2020
3. Habitat of collection: under log in very moist soil
4. Length (from head to gaster): all very small (see pics)
5. Color, hue, pattern and texture:
6. Distinguishing characteristics: #2 smelled strong
7. Distinguishing behavior:
8. Nest description: under log
9. Nuptial flight time and date:

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#2 Offline Ferox_Formicae - Posted January 19 2020 - 1:45 PM

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The first species is some sort of Pheidole, likely P. bicarinata, the second species is Tapinoma sessile, and the third species seems to be some sort of Monomorium, though closer photos with better lighting would be very helpful.


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#3 Offline Vern530 - Posted January 19 2020 - 1:58 PM

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That’s the best I can do.but my friend said same about first two.as for the third it is way smaller than the tetramorium I currently have but still possible and had 30-40 queens in the colony

#4 Offline gcsnelling - Posted January 19 2020 - 2:33 PM

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The first species is some sort of Pheidole, likely P. bicarinata, the second species is Tapinoma sessile, and the third species seems to be some sort of Monomorium, though closer photos with better lighting would be very helpful.

 Pheidole bicarinata because???


Edited by gcsnelling, January 19 2020 - 2:33 PM.

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#5 Offline Ferox_Formicae - Posted January 19 2020 - 3:57 PM

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The first species is some sort of Pheidole, likely P. bicarinata, the second species is Tapinoma sessile, and the third species seems to be some sort of Monomorium, though closer photos with better lighting would be very helpful.

 Pheidole bicarinata because???

 

It was just a guess. P. bicarinata is one of the most common North American Pheidole, and the coloration and proportions seem to match. I'm not at all saying that's what they are, it was just a quick guess going off of what I'm seeing here, and I'm fully aware that more likely than not, these are a different species. In fact, the head of the major imaged seems to be too big for bicarinata, though bicarinata did earn the common name Variable Big-Headed Ant in Mark Deyrup's Ants of Florida, just due to how ridiculously variable the species can be, though, this does refer to the variable coloration. However (again), I did stumble across some majors today during sampling of my yard that did seem to have fairly large heads in comparison to the individuals I normally see, so there is likely at least some variability in head size, and body shape and proportions as a whole, which warrants a potential revision of the species as a whole and the reintroduction of some old subspecies names, or at least variations, though it is not exactly my place to decide that.

 

That’s the best I can do.but my friend said same about first two.as for the third it is way smaller than the tetramorium I currently have but still possible and had 30-40 queens in the colony

If the colony had 30-50 dealates present, then I am very confident in my ID of Monomorium. As for species, it is impossible to tell from these images, but California has three native Monomorium species that fit the images and description provided, minimumergatogyna, and viridium.


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#6 Offline Vern530 - Posted January 19 2020 - 5:05 PM

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Awesome thanks for all the info I feel pretty confident I’m these ids after doing some research and compare photos online

#7 Offline ponerinecat - Posted January 19 2020 - 5:17 PM

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Pheidole, tapinoma sessile, and monomorium.







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