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To Diapause or not to Diapause?

diapause camponotus floridanus brachymyrmex patagonicus florida

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4 replies to this topic

Poll: Central Florida Diapause? (10 member(s) have cast votes)

Should I put the Camponotus floridanus in hibernation?

  1. Yes - Regardless of climate (4 votes [40.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 40.00%

  2. Maybe - Only if they run out of brood (1 votes [10.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 10.00%

  3. No - Not necessary in this climate (5 votes [50.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 50.00%

Should I put the Brachymyrmex patagonicus in hibernation?

  1. Yes - Regardless of climate (1 votes [10.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 10.00%

  2. Maybe - Only if they run out of brood (4 votes [40.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 40.00%

  3. No - Not necessary in this climate (5 votes [50.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 50.00%

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#1 Offline MrKotter - Posted October 8 2019 - 5:15 PM

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I'm having a rough time finding any solid research on diapause for my 1st year Camponotus floridanus (8) and Brachymyrmex patagonicus (2) colonies.  I live in central Florida (Tampa area) where we only get a couple months of cooler weather and have read some articles saying it isn't necessary, but others that say it is critical.  Our weather almost never gets below 32 degrees, but we get many days in the mid 30's and 40's during January and February.  I keep them in the garage so the temperature is relative to the weather.

 

They all still have plenty of brood and are quite active right now, but having never been through this I was hoping for any advice??

 

Thanks in advance. The more I learn about this, the less I feel like I know what I'm doing :)


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#2 Offline Manitobant - Posted October 8 2019 - 5:27 PM

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I've seen both species active in the dead of winter. They don't hibernate I'm pretty sure.
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#3 Offline ant007 - Posted October 9 2019 - 9:54 AM

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while foragers work feed and give water!!!

wintering and diapause do not always coincide.

But by the behavior you can immediately determine whether the queen and the workers are preparing for diapause or not.


Edited by ant007, October 9 2019 - 10:02 AM.

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#4 Offline Da_NewAntOnTheBlock - Posted October 10 2019 - 11:56 AM

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I'm having a rough time finding any solid research on diapause for my 1st year Camponotus floridanus (8) and Brachymyrmex patagonicus (2) colonies.  I live in central Florida (Tampa area) where we only get a couple months of cooler weather and have read some articles saying it isn't necessary, but others that say it is critical.  Our weather almost never gets below 32 degrees, but we get many days in the mid 30's and 40's during January and February.  I keep them in the garage so the temperature is relative to the weather.

 

They all still have plenty of brood and are quite active right now, but having never been through this I was hoping for any advice??

 

Thanks in advance. The more I learn about this, the less I feel like I know what I'm doing :)

Camponotous as a species is heavily rooted around diapause. Just look out for diapause signs (no brood growth, huddled colonies, and the stoppage of accepting previously readily accepted foods). If this happens then just put them in the coolest room of your house in your case as the climate is much warmer there than here. I hibernate my colony at 50 degrees Fahrenheit, so you will want to be at 55 or some place around there in terms of diapause.    


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#5 Offline ANTdrew - Posted October 10 2019 - 3:35 PM

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My two cents is that keeping them in the garage at natural temps is ideal. Keep nectar and fresh water available at all times and let them slow down as they see fit. Definitely no reason to put them in a fridge with temperatures consistently lower than outside.
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