Jump to content

  • Chat
  •  
  •  



Welcome to Formiculture.com!

This is a website for anyone interested in Myrmecology and all aspects of finding, keeping, and studying ants. The site and forum are free to use. Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation points to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!

Photo
* * * * * 2 votes

What ant species did you get completely wrong as a beginner?


56 replies to this topic

#1 Offline Manitobant - Posted April 21 2019 - 12:10 PM

Manitobant

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,118 posts
  • LocationWinnipeg, Canada
Hello guys, I decided to make this thread so we can discuss what ant species we horribly misidentified as beginners.

I will start: when I was a beginner I completely misidentified lasius brevicornis as monomorium pharaonis.

Edited by Manitobant, April 21 2019 - 12:11 PM.

  • Mettcollsuss, ANTdrew, Antkeeper01 and 2 others like this

#2 Offline Mettcollsuss - Posted April 21 2019 - 1:28 PM

Mettcollsuss

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,416 posts
  • LocationChicago, IL

1) For a few minutes I thought a Lasius americanus queen I caught was some species of Pheidole

 

2) Accidentally disturbed a Tapinoma sessile colony. Saw them rushing around and thought they were Lasius alienus (now L. americanus). Even once I saw a queen running around, it didn't occur to me. I just thought, "huh, L. alienus have smaller queens than other Lasius I've seen."

 

3) I thought my Aphaenogaster rudis queen was Tetramorium tsushimae. At that point, I had heard of T. tsushimae, but had never seen them, didn't know what they looked like, or where they lived. I just saw a strange myrmicine ant I had never seen before, figured that since it was flying around Tetramorium season (she was an early flyer), and was roughly Tetramorium sized, it must be this one random species I knew nothing about.

 

4) Not exactly a species ID mess up, but similar. I lifted a rock and found what I now recognize to be a parasitic Lasius colony's alate pupae chamber. I didn't realize they were alate cocoons at the time, and thought, "those are way too big to be Lasius pupae." I noticed that they were similarly sized to Camponotus worker pupae, and assumed that's what they were. I came to the conclusion that a Lasius colony had attacked a Camponotus colony, had won, and were now invading the brood room. It also didn't occur to me that Camponotus don't (usually) nest in soil.

 

5) I picked up a worker from a trail of what I thought were Crematogaster. They were not. Guess how I figured out what fire ant stings feel like?


Edited by Mettcollsuss, April 21 2019 - 1:28 PM.

  • TennesseeAnts, AntsBC and Antennal_Scrobe like this

#3 Offline FeedTheAnts - Posted April 21 2019 - 1:45 PM

FeedTheAnts

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,238 posts
  • LocationVirginia

I never saw Tetramorium back when I lived in TN because they happened to be rare in my locality. This coupled with the fact that I knew they were a common genus led me to beleive that almost everything was Tetramorium becuase it "just had to be". Nowadays I find them occasionally but always think they are Myrmica. Tetramorium will just never be my genus.


  • Mettcollsuss, TennesseeAnts, ANTdrew and 2 others like this

I accidentally froze all my ants 


#4 Offline TennesseeAnts - Posted April 21 2019 - 2:04 PM

TennesseeAnts

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,786 posts
  • LocationNashville, Tennessee
I misidentified a Myrmica incompleta colony as Lasius claviger.... Don't judge... :lol:
  • Mettcollsuss, TheMicroPlanet, Antkeeper01 and 1 other like this

#5 Offline FSTP - Posted April 21 2019 - 9:20 PM

FSTP

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,021 posts
  • Location36.7378° N, 119.7871° W

Dorymryrmex, mistaking bicolor queens for insanus queens and vis versa 


Edited by FSTP, April 21 2019 - 9:23 PM.

  • Mettcollsuss and Antkeeper01 like this

#6 Offline Guy_Fieri - Posted April 21 2019 - 9:55 PM

Guy_Fieri

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 84 posts
  • LocationOrange County

I made the classic mistake of confusing Pogonomyrmex with Solenopsis the first time I saw them.


  • Mettcollsuss and Antkeeper01 like this

#7 Offline Enderz - Posted April 22 2019 - 12:36 AM

Enderz

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 392 posts

On my first trip to Chaney I had never seen a Camponotus sp. in person, and I quickly spotted what I thought to be one. Turns out it was Liometopum occidentalis, a species I had never even seen a picture of. Best time ever.


  • Mettcollsuss and Antkeeper01 like this

Te deum laudamus. 

 

Ex igne et in infernum. 


#8 Offline drtrmiller - Posted April 22 2019 - 12:59 AM

drtrmiller

    Vendor

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,714 posts

When I was 6, I thought bulldog ants and carpenter ants were the same thing.

 

It wasn't until I picked up the National Audubon Society Field Guide to Insects & Spiders, maybe sometime around 2nd grade, that I started learning the proper scientific names of some insects.


Edited by drtrmiller, April 22 2019 - 1:03 AM.

  • Martialis, Mettcollsuss, TennesseeAnts and 1 other like this
 
byFormica® is the manufacturer of the iconic nectar feeders and Sunburst Ant Nectar.
byFormica ant products always deliver consistent performance, convenience,
and reliability, making them among the most beloved ant foods and kit enjoyed by
ant keeping enthusiasts worldwide. For more information, visit www.byFormica.com.

#9 Offline Martialis - Posted April 22 2019 - 6:38 AM

Martialis

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,504 posts
  • LocationMississippi

When I was 6, I thought bulldog ants and carpenter ants were the same thing.

It wasn't until I picked up the National Audubon Society Field Guide to Insects & Spiders, maybe sometime around 2nd grade, that I started learning the proper scientific names of some insects.


I have that book! It’s hwey nice, even though it can be slightly inaccurate in some areas.

I used to confuse Pheidole with Solenopsis.
  • Mettcollsuss and Antkeeper01 like this
Spoiler

#10 Offline TennesseeAnts - Posted April 22 2019 - 7:39 AM

TennesseeAnts

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,786 posts
  • LocationNashville, Tennessee

When I was 6, I thought bulldog ants and carpenter ants were the same thing.
It wasn't until I picked up the National Audubon Society Field Guide to Insects & Spiders, maybe sometime around 2nd grade, that I started learning the proper scientific names of some insects.


I have that book! It’s hwey nice, even though it can be slightly inaccurate in some areas.
I used to confuse Pheidole with Solenopsis.

Well Pheidole and Solenopsis workers are pretty similar. Queens are way different though.
  • Mettcollsuss and Antkeeper01 like this

#11 Online ANTdrew - Posted April 22 2019 - 8:06 AM

ANTdrew

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 6,587 posts
  • LocationAlexandria, VA

I just realized that what I thought were Camponotus novaeboracencis were actually C. chromaiodes all along.


  • Mettcollsuss, TennesseeAnts and Antkeeper01 like this

"The ants are a people not strong, yet they prepare their meat in the summer." Prov. 30:25  

Keep ordinary ants in extraordinary ways.


#12 Offline AntsDanijel - Posted April 22 2019 - 12:21 PM

AntsDanijel

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 23 posts
Hahaha. I found lasius niger under a rock and collect workers, put in a jar and I have a formicarium. Then I reed a lot about ants and then after a week, I realized I don't have a queen. The beginning is just funny.
  • Antkeeper01 likes this

#13 Offline Kaelwizard - Posted April 22 2019 - 2:53 PM

Kaelwizard

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,717 posts
  • LocationPoway, California

oh, I see. I thought my F. subsericea were C. pennsylvanica. Pretty dumb. But wait, that's not all! I thought Tetramorium immigrans were Temnothorax longispinosus lol


  • Mettcollsuss and Antkeeper01 like this

#14 Offline TennesseeAnts - Posted April 22 2019 - 3:08 PM

TennesseeAnts

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,786 posts
  • LocationNashville, Tennessee
I thought my T. longispinosus were T. immagrans.

Edited by Ant_Dude2908, April 22 2019 - 3:08 PM.

  • Mettcollsuss and Antkeeper01 like this

#15 Offline TennesseeAnts - Posted April 22 2019 - 3:12 PM

TennesseeAnts

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,786 posts
  • LocationNashville, Tennessee

1) For a few minutes I thought a Lasius americanus queen I caught was some species of Pheidole
 
2) Accidentally disturbed a Tapinoma sessile colony. Saw them rushing around and thought they were Lasius alienus (now L. americanus). Even once I saw a queen running around, it didn't occur to me. I just thought, "huh, L. alienus have smaller queens than other Lasius I've seen."
 
3) I thought my Aphaenogaster rudis queen was Tetramorium tsushimae. At that point, I had heard of T. tsushimae, but had never seen them, didn't know what they looked like, or where they lived. I just saw a strange myrmicine ant I had never seen before, figured that since it was flying around Tetramorium season (she was an early flyer), and was roughly Tetramorium sized, it must be this one random species I knew nothing about.
 
4) Not exactly a species ID mess up, but similar. I lifted a rock and found what I now recognize to be a parasitic Lasius colony's alate pupae chamber. I didn't realize they were alate cocoons at the time, and thought, "those are way too big to be Lasius pupae." I noticed that they were similarly sized to Camponotus worker pupae, and assumed that's what they were. I came to the conclusion that a Lasius colony had attacked a Camponotus colony, had won, and were now invading the brood room. It also didn't occur to me that Camponotus don't (usually) nest in soil.
 
5) I picked up a worker from a trail of what I thought were Crematogaster. They were not. Guess how I figured out what fire ant stings feel like?


I found out what their stings feel like when I stuck my hand in a mound....:lol:
  • Mettcollsuss and Antkeeper01 like this

#16 Offline Mdrogun - Posted April 22 2019 - 3:23 PM

Mdrogun

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 942 posts
  • LocationGainesville, FL

1) For a few minutes I thought a Lasius americanus queen I caught was some species of Pheidole

 

2) Accidentally disturbed a Tapinoma sessile colony. Saw them rushing around and thought they were Lasius alienus (now L. americanus). Even once I saw a queen running around, it didn't occur to me. I just thought, "huh, L. alienus have smaller queens than other Lasius I've seen."

 

3) I thought my Aphaenogaster rudis queen was Tetramorium tsushimae. At that point, I had heard of T. tsushimae, but had never seen them, didn't know what they looked like, or where they lived. I just saw a strange myrmicine ant I had never seen before, figured that since it was flying around Tetramorium season (she was an early flyer), and was roughly Tetramorium sized, it must be this one random species I knew nothing about.

 

4) Not exactly a species ID mess up, but similar. I lifted a rock and found what I now recognize to be a parasitic Lasius colony's alate pupae chamber. I didn't realize they were alate cocoons at the time, and thought, "those are way too big to be Lasius pupae." I noticed that they were similarly sized to Camponotus worker pupae, and assumed that's what they were. I came to the conclusion that a Lasius colony had attacked a Camponotus colony, had won, and were now invading the brood room. It also didn't occur to me that Camponotus don't (usually) nest in soil.

 

5) I picked up a worker from a trail of what I thought were Crematogaster. They were not. Guess how I figured out what fire ant stings feel like?

Fire ants up in Chicago? You sure about that lol


  • Antkeeper01 likes this

Currently Keeping:
Trachymyrmex septentrionalis

Pheidole pilifera

Forelius sp. (Monogynous, bicolored) "Midwestern Forelius"
Crematogaster cerasi

Pheidole bicarinata

Aphaenogaster rudis

Camponotus chromaiodes

Formica sp. (microgena species)

Nylanderia cf. arenivega


#17 Offline Mettcollsuss - Posted April 22 2019 - 4:19 PM

Mettcollsuss

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,416 posts
  • LocationChicago, IL

 

1) For a few minutes I thought a Lasius americanus queen I caught was some species of Pheidole

 

2) Accidentally disturbed a Tapinoma sessile colony. Saw them rushing around and thought they were Lasius alienus (now L. americanus). Even once I saw a queen running around, it didn't occur to me. I just thought, "huh, L. alienus have smaller queens than other Lasius I've seen."

 

3) I thought my Aphaenogaster rudis queen was Tetramorium tsushimae. At that point, I had heard of T. tsushimae, but had never seen them, didn't know what they looked like, or where they lived. I just saw a strange myrmicine ant I had never seen before, figured that since it was flying around Tetramorium season (she was an early flyer), and was roughly Tetramorium sized, it must be this one random species I knew nothing about.

 

4) Not exactly a species ID mess up, but similar. I lifted a rock and found what I now recognize to be a parasitic Lasius colony's alate pupae chamber. I didn't realize they were alate cocoons at the time, and thought, "those are way too big to be Lasius pupae." I noticed that they were similarly sized to Camponotus worker pupae, and assumed that's what they were. I came to the conclusion that a Lasius colony had attacked a Camponotus colony, had won, and were now invading the brood room. It also didn't occur to me that Camponotus don't (usually) nest in soil.

 

5) I picked up a worker from a trail of what I thought were Crematogaster. They were not. Guess how I figured out what fire ant stings feel like?

Fire ants up in Chicago? You sure about that lol

 

I was in North Carolina visiting family


  • Antkeeper01 likes this

#18 Offline Ferox_Formicae - Posted April 23 2019 - 5:32 AM

Ferox_Formicae

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,443 posts
  • LocationProsperity, South Carolina

I once thought a Crematogaster lineolata worker was a Solenopsis invicta queen. I was still very new to the hobby at that time. Before I got into the hobby, I thought that large Camponotus workers were Myrmecia. Everyone I knew called them Bulldog Ants, and told me their stings were really, really "painful" and "they're really aggressive." It wasn't until I found a whole bunch of Camponotus pennsylvanicus on a tree and started collecting them and I put them on iNaturalist that I realized they were pretty much harmless. But then I went to Hilton Head Island a few weeks ago and caught Camponotus floridanus for the first time. Those are aggressive! I also once falsely identified Pachycondyla harpax as Camponotus pennsylvanicus. I got a really bad sting that day. I also identified Cyphomyrmex rimosus as Cephalotes texanus for a few minutes.


  • Mettcollsuss and Antkeeper01 like this

Currently Keeping:

 

Camponotus chromaiodes, Camponotus nearcticus, Stigmatomma pallipesStrumigenys brevisetosaStrumigenys clypeataStrumigenys louisianaeStrumigenys membraniferaStrumigenys reflexaStrumigenys rostrata

 

All Strumigenys Journal

Shop

 

YouTube

Twitter


#19 Offline ponerinecat - Posted April 23 2019 - 9:02 PM

ponerinecat

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,648 posts
  • LocationCalifornia

I thought solenopsis molesta were temnothorax just because they were small. I also used to think any large ant was a queen, so i collected tons of formica and camponotus workers. My friend thought monomorium were sugar ants, and I assumed all small ants were polygyne.


  • Mettcollsuss and Antkeeper01 like this

#20 Offline Jadeninja9 - Posted April 23 2019 - 10:38 PM

Jadeninja9

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 530 posts
  • LocationSan Francisco Bay Area, CA
Before I had ever caught a single queen I misidentified a Jerusalem cricket as a Lasius Queen LOL
  • Mettcollsuss, TennesseeAnts, TheMicroPlanet and 2 others like this




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users