Jump to content

  • Chat
  •  
  •  



Welcome to Formiculture.com!

This is a website for anyone interested in Myrmecology and all aspects of finding, keeping, and studying ants. The site and forum are free to use. Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation points to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!

Photo

Antmaniac's Pheidole Sp.


  • Please log in to reply
77 replies to this topic

#41 Offline Mdrogun - Posted December 23 2015 - 10:51 PM

Mdrogun

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 942 posts
  • LocationGainesville, FL

I would still keep her on the side. Sometimes queens just randomly die and it would be nice to be able to replace your queen.


Currently Keeping:
Trachymyrmex septentrionalis

Pheidole pilifera

Forelius sp. (Monogynous, bicolored) "Midwestern Forelius"
Crematogaster cerasi

Pheidole bicarinata

Aphaenogaster rudis

Camponotus chromaiodes

Formica sp. (microgena species)

Nylanderia cf. arenivega


#42 Offline antmaniac - Posted December 23 2015 - 11:33 PM

antmaniac

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 507 posts
I guess when the original queen is too old. But the original queen is only 2 years old and survivor of the wilderness. So I doubt she will die any time soon since she is so tough. On another hand, the new queen may die randomly at this early stage so you never know.
  • LC3 likes this

#43 Offline Mdrogun - Posted December 24 2015 - 10:08 AM

Mdrogun

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 942 posts
  • LocationGainesville, FL

I think you might have the same Pheidole species as the one in this video:


Edited by Mdrogun, December 24 2015 - 10:08 AM.

Currently Keeping:
Trachymyrmex septentrionalis

Pheidole pilifera

Forelius sp. (Monogynous, bicolored) "Midwestern Forelius"
Crematogaster cerasi

Pheidole bicarinata

Aphaenogaster rudis

Camponotus chromaiodes

Formica sp. (microgena species)

Nylanderia cf. arenivega


#44 Offline antmaniac - Posted December 24 2015 - 3:37 PM

antmaniac

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 507 posts
At first, I thought the same. But after cross exam the video and my species, I think there is a slight difference. The species in the video seems to have smoother appearance and the majors do not have dramatically large head as my species. I can't be 100% but it doesn't really matter. Too many variant in Australia, I found even the sugar banded ants have slight variety in different state.
  • LC3 likes this

#45 Offline antmaniac - Posted December 24 2015 - 6:58 PM

antmaniac

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 507 posts

Unfortunately the new queen died, due to unknown reason. The abdomen is flatten and dried up, possible parasites from the water.

 

25/12/2015

On another hand, good news is that the major worker has finally eclose. She already tried to get into action and push away other minor workers to go up. 3 minor workers have to hold her down by biting on her antennae. A video has recorded for this moment.

20151225 145407
20151225 145834
20151225 150235
 

 


Edited by antmaniac, December 24 2015 - 8:35 PM.

  • CoolColJ likes this

#46 Offline antmaniac - Posted December 29 2015 - 12:33 AM

antmaniac

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 507 posts

29/12/2015

The major worker has become a bit darker now. She also moved to the chamber where used to be garbage dump. The ants have clean the chamber and removed all the garbage. Therefore it is still quite dirty on the glass and hard to take a clear photo.

20151229 190006
 
Queen vs Major, head comparison.
20151229 200939
 
2/1/2016
The major workers are used as food storage. The minor workers are even smaller now in comparison with the major workers.
20160102 073054
20160102 073151
 
8/1/2016
The major worker is getting even darker. I plan to give them the grass seeds in a week's time so the major is ready to crush them. Meanwhile all the majors are still retreat to the very bottom chamber when there is danger alert.
20160108 205433

 

 


Edited by antmaniac, January 8 2016 - 3:44 PM.


#47 Offline antmaniac - Posted January 8 2016 - 3:48 PM

antmaniac

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 507 posts

8/1/2016

One of the alate queens has finally eclosed. The wings are well groomed and look after by the workers.

20160108 194240
20160108 203238
20160108 203356

 


  • Gregory2455, Okeedoke22 and CrazyLegs like this

#48 Offline Mdrogun - Posted January 8 2016 - 4:37 PM

Mdrogun

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 942 posts
  • LocationGainesville, FL

I wonder if this species mates within the nest?


Currently Keeping:
Trachymyrmex septentrionalis

Pheidole pilifera

Forelius sp. (Monogynous, bicolored) "Midwestern Forelius"
Crematogaster cerasi

Pheidole bicarinata

Aphaenogaster rudis

Camponotus chromaiodes

Formica sp. (microgena species)

Nylanderia cf. arenivega


#49 Offline antmaniac - Posted January 8 2016 - 10:35 PM

antmaniac

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 507 posts
Don't think they mate in their nest. Otherwise they wouldn't need nuptial flights. Although some Pheidole species are known for branching by mating within colony and super colony with multiple queens. Furthermore this colony don't have any drones. Hence I would need to find drones to test this out.

Edited by antmaniac, January 9 2016 - 1:26 AM.


#50 Offline Mdrogun - Posted January 12 2016 - 4:26 PM

Mdrogun

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 942 posts
  • LocationGainesville, FL

I know of species such as Tapinoma sessile that have nuptial flights and mate within the nest it is entirely possible.


Edited by Mdrogun, January 12 2016 - 4:26 PM.

Currently Keeping:
Trachymyrmex septentrionalis

Pheidole pilifera

Forelius sp. (Monogynous, bicolored) "Midwestern Forelius"
Crematogaster cerasi

Pheidole bicarinata

Aphaenogaster rudis

Camponotus chromaiodes

Formica sp. (microgena species)

Nylanderia cf. arenivega


#51 Offline antmaniac - Posted January 12 2016 - 5:04 PM

antmaniac

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 507 posts

I know of species such as Tapinoma sessile that have nuptial flights and mate within the nest it is entirely possible.

The thing is, this colony did not produce any drones, only alate queens. So my thought is, this colony is still young and with plentful food and resources, they make alate queens. When the colony get older, they start to produce drones and pass on the gene. This way they can share the survival of the gene globally, just my random thought on this phenomenon. 



#52 Offline Mdrogun - Posted January 12 2016 - 7:30 PM

Mdrogun

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 942 posts
  • LocationGainesville, FL

They could still produce drones. I agree they definitely have nuptial flights. I'm just saying they might breed in the nest because the colony is not at it's full grown size yet. This might indicate they are trying to speed up growth. Also other males could come from nearby colonies to mate in the wild.


Currently Keeping:
Trachymyrmex septentrionalis

Pheidole pilifera

Forelius sp. (Monogynous, bicolored) "Midwestern Forelius"
Crematogaster cerasi

Pheidole bicarinata

Aphaenogaster rudis

Camponotus chromaiodes

Formica sp. (microgena species)

Nylanderia cf. arenivega


#53 Offline antmaniac - Posted January 13 2016 - 2:38 PM

antmaniac

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 507 posts

They could still produce drones. I agree they definitely have nuptial flights. I'm just saying they might breed in the nest because the colony is not at it's full grown size yet. This might indicate they are trying to speed up growth. Also other males could come from nearby colonies to mate in the wild.

That could be the case too. Pheidole can have multiple queens in one colony indeed.



#54 Offline antmaniac - Posted January 20 2016 - 2:13 AM

antmaniac

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 507 posts
16/1/2016
I have found another queen, this time on the dry ground instead of the water. So far she is surviving well.
IMG 20160116 170859

 

19/1/2016

The major worker has started her work, dealing with large difficult foods like seeds and insects. I have recorded her dissecting work in action.

20160119 193634
20160119 193910
20160119 210049
20160119 210129

 


  • Barristan and LC3 like this

#55 Offline Barristan - Posted January 20 2016 - 4:10 AM

Barristan

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 854 posts
  • LocationBindlach, Bavaria, Germany

Great colony I love Pheidole ;)



#56 Offline antmaniac - Posted January 20 2016 - 3:36 PM

antmaniac

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 507 posts

Great colony I love Pheidole ;)

Thanks, yours is really nice too. The major in my colony only come out to help when the colony is low on food and has been hungry for few days. This way they will thoroughly process the food by cut up all the parts and feed to the larvae! When there are plenty of foods, the major will become lazy and just stay in the nest, carry out patrol, defense and storage jobs. The carcass will remain in the outworld.



#57 Offline antmaniac - Posted February 7 2016 - 12:22 AM

antmaniac

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 507 posts

6/2/2016

20160206 201435
 

13/2/2016

Fed them some seeds, which I processed them first in order to avoid germination within the nest. They have stored all the seeds soon after.

20160213 154241

 


Edited by antmaniac, February 13 2016 - 6:57 PM.

  • Barristan likes this

#58 Offline antmaniac - Posted February 12 2016 - 3:23 AM

antmaniac

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 507 posts

12/2/2016

One wingless queen got dragged outside and get dissected by the workers. She could be the one of the virgin queens who shredded wings. Other possibility is the original queen died from old age, but I doubt that. I guess also partly due to the fact that I haven't feed them for a while now even though there is always honey available. The other virgin queens with wings still alive though.

 

14/2/2016

This morning I saw one of the virgin queens wandering out of the nest and appeared to be seeking to take off. Then she moved back to the nest afterward. I shined the led light into the nest to have a closer look. Surprisingly, this somehow trigger the nuptial flight again. So I quickly took some photos after removed the lid of the outworld. At one stage, she almost climbed all the way up to the top and the workers can be seen nibbling on her to encourage her. I tried to pick her up, but failed and ended up scared the queen back into the nest. Soon after, mass workers swarmed out to defend, so I had to leave them alone.

20160214 125433

Edited by antmaniac, February 13 2016 - 7:17 PM.

  • Hubert likes this

#59 Offline antmaniac - Posted March 12 2016 - 2:41 AM

antmaniac

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 507 posts
21/2/2016
20160221 205345
 
6/3/2016
I fed them a living grasshopper, the battle lasted for quite a period of time. In the end, the ants won, at cost of some minor workers got chewed up. Aftermath, upon returning to the nest, each soldier ant was cleaned by the minor ants at entrance. Just like science fiction movie, these soldier ants had returned from some rough battles in the barren outworld. This colony is very clean and well self maintained. I guess for me that is a good thing, the formicarium is kept neat and tidy without my effort.
20160306 222335
 
The video clip shows some actions during the battle, one of the soldier ants can be seen got kicked flying due to the powerful hind legs of the grasshopper. 



#60 Offline antmaniac - Posted March 15 2016 - 5:44 AM

antmaniac

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 507 posts

16/3/2016

Too dark, too crowded.

20160315 230743
20160315 230727
20160315 230714

 


  • Barristan and LC3 like this




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users