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Aaron's Colobopsis impressa Journal (Updated 6/25/19)

colobopsis

75 replies to this topic

#61 Offline Ferox_Formicae - Posted December 16 2018 - 12:05 PM

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Ok, thanks. I have seen mostly Crematogaster and Ponera in hollow twigs.

Ponera? I think you're thinking of Pseudomyrmex ejectus as Ponera is a ground dwelling genera.


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#62 Offline Ant_Dude2908 - Posted December 16 2018 - 5:46 PM

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No, I mean Ponera.

#63 Offline Canadian anter - Posted December 17 2018 - 3:01 PM

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I believed Ponera was a purely terrestrial species?
Visit us at www.canada-ant-colony.com !

#64 Offline Ant_Dude2908 - Posted December 17 2018 - 6:42 PM

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Nope. Not where I live. I find them under rocks and in logs with termites in them.

#65 Offline LIFEsize - Posted March 6 2019 - 3:08 PM

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Sadly my queen hasn't laid any eggs after about a month, so I'm assuming she's infertile. I hope your colony continues to grow. This will be a really cool species to see develop. Something cool I read somewhere is that you can put a cork in the entrance of their formicarium, the majors will chew out a hole just the right size to block with their flat heads.

i have been sitting on a tube with two of these for 8 months. One has wings and one shed them when I first got her, however, nothing has happened and I have tried heating them around 80 degrees F and still nothing. I’m going to seperate them into seperate tubes and see if it’s because they’re together. I don’t know if these are mono or poly, but if anyone knows then please inform me.

Current Colonies:
Aphaenogaster fulva - Queen and brood
Camponotus chromaiodes - Queen and 12+ workers
Crematogaster cerasi - Queen and 2+ workers
Colobopsis impressa - 1 Queen

Lasius Umbratus - 2 Queens


#66 Offline Ferox_Formicae - Posted April 29 2019 - 11:21 AM

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Sadly my queen hasn't laid any eggs after about a month, so I'm assuming she's infertile. I hope your colony continues to grow. This will be a really cool species to see develop. Something cool I read somewhere is that you can put a cork in the entrance of their formicarium, the majors will chew out a hole just the right size to block with their flat heads.

i have been sitting on a tube with two of these for 8 months. One has wings and one shed them when I first got her, however, nothing has happened and I have tried heating them around 80 degrees F and still nothing. I’m going to seperate them into seperate tubes and see if it’s because they’re together. I don’t know if these are mono or poly, but if anyone knows then please inform me.

 

I once found a colony of Colobopsis impressa with 2 queens, so I'd say polygynous.


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#67 Offline ponerinecat - Posted April 29 2019 - 2:22 PM

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Nope. Not where I live. I find them under rocks and in logs with termites in them.

yes, but that's still terrestrial. Are the twigs on the ground?



#68 Offline Ant_Dude2908 - Posted April 29 2019 - 3:02 PM

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I found out those were Brachyponera.
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#69 Offline Ferox_Formicae - Posted April 29 2019 - 3:56 PM

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I found out those were Brachyponera.

Ahh, that makes more sense.


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#70 Offline NickAnter - Posted May 18 2019 - 7:26 AM

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Update?


Currently keeping:             

Camponotus hyatti (1, single queen, 1 worker.)                     "Keep your eyes on the stars and your feet on the ground." -Theodore Roosevelt

                                                                                              "Either you will control your government, or government will control you." -Ronald Reagan

                                                                                "Leadership is the art is getting someone else to do something you want done because he wants to do it." -                                                                                   Dwight  D. Eisenhower

                        

 

Currently founding:

---Solenopsis molesta(2 tubes  with five in one and two in the other.  )

---Monomorium cf. minimum(1 queen) Pheidole navigans(9 separate queens) Hypoponera sp. (1 queen)  Nylanderia vividula(1)

Hoping to get soon:Camponotus fragilis,Lasius pallitarsis and brevicornis,Formica argentea,Stigmatomma pallipes/oregonense and Pogonomyrmex californicus.


#71 Offline Aaron567 - Posted May 20 2019 - 2:43 PM

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May 20, 2019

 

Colobopsis impressa flights have been kicking off all over Florida in the past couple weeks, and my part of the state is usually last to get flights of most species relative to the rest of the state. It's been very dry lately and has not rained in over a week, so I had a feeling that I was going to get the first Colobopsis flights as soon as the humidity became a little higher.

 

Last night, the temperature and humidity was more favorable than it had been for a several days, and the first Colobopsis flights happened. There were queens all over the place but I decided to only collect 10 of them because I don't need so many and they'll be flying for a little while anyway. As an experiment, I have two pairs of queens that will be combined.

 

b4Kb18R.jpg

 

 

Out of the 10 queens, one of them is prettier than the rest, and she is the one that happened to shed her wings right after I test tubed her. I've never had a Colobopsis queen shed her wings that fast.

 

qNODmdK.jpg


Edited by Aaron567, May 20 2019 - 2:44 PM.

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#72 Offline Ant_Dude2908 - Posted May 20 2019 - 3:05 PM

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When will these fly in Middle Tennessee?

#73 Offline Aaron567 - Posted June 15 2019 - 3:30 PM

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June 15, 2019

 

The wingless queen has her first pupa, and so does nearly every other C. impressa queen I have now. The two-queen pairs are looking great and I'm looking forward to see if they remain a double queen colony even after nanitics.

 

gpvkuqk.jpg


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#74 Offline Ant_Dude2908 - Posted June 19 2019 - 6:44 AM

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Any tips for this species? I just found a beautiful one of these queens.

#75 Offline Aaron567 - Posted June 25 2019 - 10:40 AM

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June 25, 2019

 

One of the pairs got their first nanitic and have a nice-looking group of brood, and three individual queens have gotten their nanitics too. I've had to give most of the queens extra sugar water before their nanitics hatched because by the time they have pupae they're deathly skinny. I wonder if this is just natural selection and if they would've died if they were in the wild right now from running too low on food stores. Their low success rate could be why they have such enormous nuptial flights.

 

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flQFEbA.jpg

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b46RxWo.jpg



#76 Offline Ant_Dude2908 - Posted June 25 2019 - 12:08 PM

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My queen has shed her wings. How long until nanitics?





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