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Dspdrew's Temnothorax caguatan Journal [191] (Discontinued)

temnothorax journal dspdrew

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#1 Offline dspdrew - Posted September 24 2014 - 1:21 PM

dspdrew
  • LocationSanta Ana, CA

9-24-2014
 
On Thursday 7-24-2014 I found this Temnothorax caguatan alate on my black light trap up in Trabuco Canyon, California. It was a very warm, calm and humid night.
 
ID Thread: forum.formiculture.com/index.php/topic/432-
 
1. Location of collection: Trabuco Canyon, California.
2. Date of collection: 7-24-2014.
3. Habitat of collection: Chaparral/Oak Forest.
4. Length (from head to gaster): 5mm (queen).
5. Color, hue, pattern and texture: Head and thorax rugose; brown head, redish-orange thorax, dark brown gaster.
6. Distinguishing characteristics:
 
med_gallery_2_235_149031.jpg
 
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A few days later it laid a few eggs.
 
Her larvae grew slow, and she finally got her first worker a few days ago, almost two months later.
 
med_gallery_2_235_664898.jpg
 
med_gallery_2_235_38053.jpg
 
med_gallery_2_235_89134.jpg
 
 
Edit: I added new microscope pictures of one of the nanitic workers.


Edited by dspdrew, June 3 2015 - 12:18 AM.


#2 Offline Gregory2455 - Posted September 24 2014 - 2:20 PM

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These are my favorite of all your temnothorax. :) Happy to see she is fertile. 



#3 Offline dspdrew - Posted September 24 2014 - 4:20 PM

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  • LocationSanta Ana, CA

They look just like your avatar. :]



#4 Offline Gregory2455 - Posted September 24 2014 - 4:33 PM

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I was going to say- aren't they Temnothorax rugatulus?



#5 Offline dspdrew - Posted September 24 2014 - 6:32 PM

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  • LocationSanta Ana, CA

I don't know.



#6 Offline Alza - Posted September 24 2014 - 10:36 PM

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that worker isn't the real color yet right ? 



#7 Offline Gregory2455 - Posted September 24 2014 - 10:52 PM

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that worker isn't the real color yet right ? 

Correct, it is still a callow worker.



#8 Offline Gregory2455 - Posted October 11 2014 - 5:29 PM

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Got more pictures to this?



#9 Offline dspdrew - Posted October 11 2014 - 5:36 PM

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  • LocationSanta Ana, CA

Not yet.



#10 Offline dspdrew - Posted June 3 2015 - 12:11 AM

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  • LocationSanta Ana, CA

Update 6-3-2015
 
This colony seems to be doing alright, they are just growing very slowly. Right now they have 10 workers and about 15 brood. It looks like one of the queen's wings finally fell off.
 
I finally ID'd this colony as Temnothorax caguatan. The only two Temnothorax species in California with 11 antennal segments, and propodeal spines this long are T. caguatan and T. rugatulus, according to AntWiki. Apparently T. caguatan have a slightly longer, more obtuse petiole node and thicker hind femur. This can clearly be seen when comparing the pictures on AntWeb.

 

This diagram I made shows the difference between the petiole nodes.

 

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Here is the profile view of one of these nanitics. I think you can clearly see it has the longer petiole node. It also has a pretty bulky hind femur.

 

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Here's some pictures of the colony as of now.

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med_gallery_2_235_24194.jpg
 
med_gallery_2_235_653136.jpg


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#11 Offline Alexant - Posted June 3 2015 - 1:44 AM

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How big are the current workers?



#12 Offline dspdrew - Posted June 3 2015 - 6:25 AM

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Just a little over 2 mm.



#13 Offline Alexant - Posted June 3 2015 - 11:16 AM

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Wow that's small. :)



#14 Offline dspdrew - Posted July 1 2015 - 11:57 PM

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  • LocationSanta Ana, CA

Update 7-2-2015
 
This colony has only gained one worker in the last month, bringing them up to eleven workers. They grow so slow, but at least they seem pretty healthy.

 

med_gallery_2_235_88918.jpg

 

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I found another one of these queens on 6-28-2015, in the exact same spot. I thought it was Pheidole for a while, until I realized it was Temnothorax and at a closer look, another T. caguatan.



#15 Offline dspdrew - Posted November 30 2015 - 7:12 AM

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  • LocationSanta Ana, CA

Update 11-30-2015
 
Shortly after moving to a new apartment, all of the workers in this colony died for some reason. I really have no idea what caused this, but it seems to happen to some colonies in test tube setups from time to time. I rarely see this happen to colonies with an open test tube, or in a formicarium.



#16 Offline Myrmicinae - Posted November 30 2015 - 8:38 AM

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Update 11-30-2015
 
Shortly after moving to a new apartment, all of the workers in this colony died for some reason. I really have no idea what caused this, but it seems to happen to some colonies in test tube setups from time to time. I rarely see this happen to colonies with an open test tube, or in a formicarium.

 

Did you notice any fungi on the cotton?


Journals on Formiculture:
Pheidole ceres
Tapinoma sessile

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#17 Offline dspdrew - Posted November 30 2015 - 9:45 AM

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  • LocationSanta Ana, CA

Yes. Quite often there is at least some fungus in most of my test tubes. It could have been fungus that killed them, and being in a tube like that probably makes it even worse. It's just impossible to know which fungus will kill them, because a lot of it doesn't seem to hurt ants at all.



#18 Offline Gregory2455 - Posted December 6 2015 - 11:10 PM

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Your's are doing very good. I only have one worker in mine.



#19 Offline dspdrew - Posted December 7 2015 - 7:24 AM

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How is no workers better than one haha?



#20 Offline Gregory2455 - Posted December 7 2015 - 5:04 PM

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How is no workers better than one haha?

Wait you do not have a single one with workers now?







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