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How do I identify Odontoponera Queens?


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9 replies to this topic

#1 Offline Hightlyze - Posted March 14 2019 - 6:07 PM

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They look like workers but their thorax is bigger. How do I even tell? Do I have to capture every Odontoponera I see?

#2 Offline Manitobant - Posted March 14 2019 - 6:30 PM

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They are a bit bigger and have a larger thorax. Here is a link to some photos (the queen is in the centre and middle-left photo):https://antofchina.s...m/Odontoponera/
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#3 Offline Hightlyze - Posted March 14 2019 - 6:38 PM

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They are a bit bigger and have a larger thorax. Here is a link to some photos (the queen is in the centre and middle-left photo):https://antofchina.s...m/Odontoponera/


Slightly larger? They tryna make me ragequit? It's impossible to tell. Why does the queen look so similar to workers?

#4 Offline Leo - Posted March 14 2019 - 8:42 PM

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It is very possible to tell.

 

No offense, but you want hard? Try to find and ergatoid queen of leptogenys while they are moving and stinging. THAT is hard


Edited by Leo, March 14 2019 - 8:45 PM.


#5 Offline Hightlyze - Posted March 14 2019 - 9:00 PM

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It is very possible to tell.
 
No offense, but you want hard? Try to find and ergatoid queen of leptogenys while they are moving and stinging. THAT is hard

What?

#6 Offline Leo - Posted March 14 2019 - 10:31 PM

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An ergatoid queen, is a queen that looks like a worker. but with a slightly larger gaster. No wing scars.



#7 Offline Hightlyze - Posted March 14 2019 - 10:46 PM

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Where am I to most likely see one? Not the ergatroid the odontoponera queen

Edited by Hightlyze, March 14 2019 - 10:46 PM.


#8 Offline Leo - Posted March 14 2019 - 10:49 PM

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There are no ergatoid odontopoera queens



#9 Offline Hightlyze - Posted March 14 2019 - 10:53 PM

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I'm talking about odontoponera queens and where could I most likely find them.

#10 Online Ant_Dude2908 - Posted March 15 2019 - 6:20 AM

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I don't live in asia , but try looking after a storm on a sunny day. It works for Brachyponera in America. If you want it really easy, look for queens with their wings still on. Just not near a nest, as she will be infertile.

My journals:                                             My shop:                                                                        Tennessee Anting Thread:                 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                      

                                                                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                     

                                                                                                                                                                         

Aphaenogaster rudis

 

Aphaenogater tenneseenis                      Ant_Dude2908's Antkeeping Supply Shop                    Tennessee Anting Thread

 

Brachyponera chinesis

 

Camponotus subbarbatus

 

Camponotus chromaiodes

 

Crematogaster ashmeadi

 

 

 

Ants I've found (in TN) : Aphaenogaster rudis, Aphaenogaster tenneseenis, Brahcyponera chinesis, Camponotus subbarbatus, Camponotus chromaiodes, Camponotus pennsylvanicus, Camponotus snellingi, Crematogaster ashmeadi, Crematogaster lineolata, Crematogaster cerasi, all Temnothorax spp., Solenopsis invicta, Solenopsis xyloni, Stigmatomma pallipes, all Strumigenys spp.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 





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