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Ants STILL NOT HIBERNATING, even in temperatures a few degrees above freezing!

stigmatomma myrmica annoyance

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#1 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted November 23 2017 - 6:40 AM

Connectimyrmex

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For some reason, my two most active semi-claustral species still are refusing to hibernate.

Like you guys recommended, I put all of my ants in cold temperatures, and most of them dropped into hibernation. Sadly, some of my ants didn't seem to get the memo. The Myrmica queen nearly chewed out of her tube (now she's in a terrarium) and the Stigmatomma queen sucked one of the Aphaenogaster larvae that I provided dry.

 

Are they just not ready for hibernation yet?


Hawaiiant (Ben)

Keeper of
Miniature Labradoodle
Baby Wolf Spider
Mud Dauber wasp larvae
Ochetellus Glaber
Solenopsis Geminata
Brachymyrmex Obscurior
Cardiocondyla Emeryi
Tetramorium Bicarinatum
Plagiolepis Alluaudi
Anoplolepis Gracilipes
Technomyrmex Difficilis
Pheidole Megacephala
Aholehole fish
Cowrie snail
Sea Fan Worm
100+ sea squirts
Tree seedlings
Ghost Crab
Day Gecko
Small Fat Centipede
Endemic Lacewing larva
Vernal Pool shrimps

#2 Offline Batspiderfish - Posted November 23 2017 - 7:21 AM

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Hibernation is a low-energy state, in the cold. It's not necessarily "sleeping".


If you've enjoyed using my expertise and identifications, please do not create undue ecological risk by releasing your ants. The environment which we keep our pet insects is alien and oftentimes unsanitary, so ensure that wild populations stay safe by giving your ants the best care you can manage for the rest of their lives, as we must do with any other pet.

 

Exotic ants are for those who think that vibrant diversity is something you need to pay money to see. It is illegal to transport live ants across state lines.

 

----

Black lives still matter.


#3 Offline MegaMyrmex - Posted November 23 2017 - 8:34 AM

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For semi- claustral species , I have a hypothesis-
Since they don't contain the fat or food reserves like most fully claustral specues, they probably adapted to foraging in near- freezing temperatures. They don't have any workers either so they most likely still need a good source of food with them.

Proverbs 6:6-8 New International Version (NIV)

Go to the ant, you sluggard;
    consider its ways and be wise!
It has no commander,
    no overseer or ruler,
yet it stores its provisions in summer
    and gathers its food at harvest.

 


#4 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted November 23 2017 - 9:01 AM

Connectimyrmex

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For semi- claustral species , I have a hypothesis-
Since they don't contain the fat or food reserves like most fully claustral specues, they probably adapted to foraging in near- freezing temperatures. They don't have any workers either so they most likely still need a good source of food with them.

That makes sense. Some semi-claustral species still fatten up pre-hibernation, though (my Ponera queen is hibernating perfectly fine)

 

Hibernation is a low-energy state, in the cold. It's not necessarily "sleeping".

True, but I thought mine would try to conserve energy rather than use it all up...


Hawaiiant (Ben)

Keeper of
Miniature Labradoodle
Baby Wolf Spider
Mud Dauber wasp larvae
Ochetellus Glaber
Solenopsis Geminata
Brachymyrmex Obscurior
Cardiocondyla Emeryi
Tetramorium Bicarinatum
Plagiolepis Alluaudi
Anoplolepis Gracilipes
Technomyrmex Difficilis
Pheidole Megacephala
Aholehole fish
Cowrie snail
Sea Fan Worm
100+ sea squirts
Tree seedlings
Ghost Crab
Day Gecko
Small Fat Centipede
Endemic Lacewing larva
Vernal Pool shrimps

#5 Offline MegaMyrmex - Posted November 23 2017 - 10:39 AM

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I believe that Myrmica are quite accustomed to cold weather...also, I have collected a sluggish but nonetheless active ponera or hypoponera colony underneath a rock after a snowfall. The workers were all slow but still active. I also find LOTS of ponera sp. and hypoponera sp. workers foraging underneath moss.

Proverbs 6:6-8 New International Version (NIV)

Go to the ant, you sluggard;
    consider its ways and be wise!
It has no commander,
    no overseer or ruler,
yet it stores its provisions in summer
    and gathers its food at harvest.

 






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: stigmatomma, myrmica, annoyance

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