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Grand Haven MI - July 9 2017

july michigan

Best Answer VoidElecent , July 9 2017 - 7:30 PM

Tetramorium Sp. E

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#1 Offline cfreidsma - Posted July 9 2017 - 7:14 PM

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1. Location (on a map) of collection: Grand Haven Michigan, Under some cut wood planks for a fire. 

2. Date of collection: July 4 2017
3. Habitat of collection: A forested area with scattered houses under some cut wood planks. 
4. Length (from head to gaster): Around 10mm 
5. Color, hue, pattern and texture: 
6. Distinguishing characteristics: Workers bite
7. Distinguishing behavior:  Cannot right themselves easily
8. Nest description: One large egg deposit and scattered tunnels. 

 

I was at my aunt and uncles house for the 4th of July. My uncle has a decent sized fire pit for having camp fires, and then a small wood pile next to it. When he lifted one of the planks there was a pretty good sized nest with multiple winged ants. I wouldn't normally mess with an established nest, but this being under some fire wood that was about to be used, I gathered these two instead of them getting burnt. The rest of the nest and its eggs were on the ground so within a few minutes they had all moved. 

 

I am thinking that they are pre flight though. One appears male and the other female. Either this or they settled the nest with multiple queens. 

 

I can take more pictures if needed. I kind of realized how cloudy the plastic test tubes are. 

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#2 Offline VoidElecent - Posted July 9 2017 - 7:30 PM   Best Answer

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Tetramorium Sp. E



#3 Offline Batspiderfish - Posted July 9 2017 - 7:32 PM

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These alates are almost certainly unmated.


If you've enjoyed using my expertise and identifications, please do not create undue ecological risk by releasing your ants. The environment which we keep our pet insects is alien and oftentimes unsanitary, so ensure that wild populations stay safe by giving your ants the best care you can manage for the rest of their lives, as we must do with any other pet.

 

Exotic ants are for those who think that vibrant diversity is something you need to pay money to see. It is illegal to transport live ants across state lines.

 

----

Black lives still matter.


#4 Offline VoidElecent - Posted July 9 2017 - 7:35 PM

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I agree, did it look like you picked these up from a mature colony?



#5 Offline cfreidsma - Posted July 9 2017 - 7:36 PM

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I agree, did it look like you picked these up from a mature colony?

 

I am thinking so. There was a rather large amount of eggs and workers for it not to be. 







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