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looking for ant queen in europe some that can help

antiloveforever

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#1 Offline ThomasJ - Posted March 25 2017 - 2:34 PM

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SOS  :o  %)  :sore: 

 

looking for ant queen in europe some that can help

live in Denmark and have been looking for months without success :-(

 

looking for species:

 

Solenopsis invicta (red fire ant

Tetramorium caespitum

but other fast species are also of interest :lol:  :yahoo:


Edited by ThomasJ, March 25 2017 - 2:36 PM.


#2 Offline Vanko - Posted March 25 2017 - 2:59 PM

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As far as I know red fire ants are not easy to care for and also why don't you just collect any queen you find ( same as I do) and just hope it's fast growing species 😃😃
😛 🐜 😛

#3 Offline LC3 - Posted March 25 2017 - 2:59 PM

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Solenopsis invicta isn't native to Denmark, you won't be finding any of them there unless you were to buy them. Tetramorium sp.e/caespitum flies during early summer. Usually at the beginning of June.

 

http://www.formicult...ngmating-chart/

^Mating chart

 

http://antmaps.org/?

^Helpful website (Not 100% accurate but close enough)


Edited by LC3, March 25 2017 - 2:59 PM.


#4 Offline VoidElecent - Posted March 25 2017 - 3:31 PM

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I'd look at the species listed on http://antmaps.org/?, and research them each individually.



#5 Offline Works4TheGood - Posted March 25 2017 - 5:35 PM

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I have caught MANY queens while they were drowning in pools. Trust me, it's a great place to find them! I can remember a few times when I was young and helped a neighbor with their pool cleaning. I would sometimes skim out hundreds of drowning alates.

I would take a look at this link by Crystals:
http://www.formicult...tch-ant-queens/

Edited by Works4TheGood, March 25 2017 - 5:44 PM.

~Dan

#6 Offline thosaka - Posted March 25 2017 - 9:24 PM

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Look for queens a day or two after it rains or look for holes with small amount of dirt around it. Doesn't Denmark have the world's first ant store Antstore.net? If all fails, maybe you can buy some from there.

#7 Offline Georgeev - Posted March 26 2017 - 12:31 AM

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1)I live also in Europe,You will have to wait until Nuptial flights start in your area.Luckily in 2-3 weeks it will start.

You can watch this video if you want information about nuptial flight schedules -->

Btw europe information is in the 7th minute but i highly suggest you to watch all the video because it has  other useful information(capturing, etc..)

 2)Also as far i know Solenopsis invicta don't exist in Europe(luckily).I also wouldn't recommend them as a beginner species,they are very hard to keep.For more info about fire ants watch this video-->  

3)Tetramorium Caespitum is a great beginner species and they are native to your area(perhaps to all Europe)For more info about Tetramorium ants(Pavement ants)you can watch this video-->

4)i would also recommend to see your native ant species in this website --> http://antmaps.org/?

 

Hope i helped you and if you have other questions about ants feel free to ask me :)



#8 Offline ThomasJ - Posted March 26 2017 - 2:02 AM

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thank everyone for your help ... ;-) I'm experienced with having pet ant and has held several species through time ... :-)

so therefore I seek a place you can buy a kind I have not had or have (y)



#9 Offline AkumaArtist - Posted March 28 2017 - 7:02 AM

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Well,if this summer I can find one I'll tell ya,here in spain there are a lot of them during june qwp



#10 Offline ThomasJ - Posted March 29 2017 - 1:01 AM

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it will be nice



#11 Offline Serafine - Posted March 29 2017 - 1:28 AM

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I wouldn't recommend Solenopsis invicta or geminata to a beginner. These ants sting incredibly painful, are a real danger to other pets as well as any children and they have a RIDICULOUS growth rate. A queen of these species can bump out over 11.000 eggs PER WEEK if well-fed and temperated. That's essentially a an AC omni nest full of ants. Per week. They will also consume enormous amounts of food and water and their workers only live for 3-4 months which means huge piles of garbage and dead workers.

They're also known to be escape artists (and are by default semi-nomadic) and if these ants escape you have a serious problem.

They're also invasive (especially invicta) with a bad habit to hunt, kill and entirely eradicate native species. There's areas where invicta is pretty much the only ant left (or is left competing with other invasive ants such as Argentine ants and the bigheaded ants Pheidole megacephalia).

 

 

There's a few monogynous ants in Europe that have good growth rates (most notably Tetramorium which can also found colonies of multiple queens although all but one will killed later on by the workers) and some highly polygynous species (Formica sp, Solenopsis fugax) that can also dish out impressive amounts of brood pretty quickly, plus some exotics that aren't too hard to get from a shop (like Pheidole species or if you want large ants with an acceptable growth speed Camponotus nicobarensis).

 

Actually even some Camponotus ants (barbaricus, herculeanus, ligniperdus) can grow really really large colonies, they just grow very slowly in the first 2-3 years then they pick up with most other species in a sudden population explosion.


Edited by Serafine, March 29 2017 - 9:09 AM.

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We should respect all forms of consciousness. The body is just a vessel, a mere hull.

Welcome to Lazy Tube - My Camponotus Journal


#12 Offline Vanko - Posted March 30 2017 - 10:47 PM

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I have a lot of messor structor queens, if you stil can't t find any queens.
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😛 🐜 😛

#13 Offline Alabama Anter - Posted March 31 2017 - 6:42 AM

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I wouldn't recommend Solenopsis invicta or geminata to a beginner. These ants sting incredibly painful, are a real danger to other pets as well as any children and they have a RIDICULOUS growth rate. A queen of these species can bump out over 11.000 eggs PER WEEK if well-fed and temperated. That's essentially a an AC omni nest full of ants. Per week. They will also consume enormous amounts of food and water and their workers only live for 3-4 months which means huge piles of garbage and dead workers.

They're also known to be escape artists (and are by default semi-nomadic) and if these ants escape you have a serious problem.

They're also invasive (especially invicta) with a bad habit to hunt, kill and entirely eradicate native species. There's areas where invicta is pretty much the only ant left (or is left competing with other invasive ants such as Argentine ants and the bigheaded ants Pheidole megacephalia).

 

 

There's a few monogynous ants in Europe that have good growth rates (most notably Tetramorium which can also found colonies of multiple queens although all but one will killed later on by the workers) and some highly polygynous species (Formica sp, Solenopsis fugax) that can also dish out impressive amounts of brood pretty quickly, plus some exotics that aren't too hard to get from a shop (like Pheidole species or if you want large ants with an acceptable growth speed Camponotus nicobarensis).

 

Actually even some Camponotus ants (barbaricus, herculeanus, ligniperdus) can grow really really large colonies, they just grow very slowly in the first 2-3 years then they pick up with most other species in a sudden population explosion.

He states that he is not a beginner. And they can be a beginner species with the right formicaria, food, money, and floun.


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Keeper of...

(2) Parakeets
(2) Peppered Corydoras
(4) Neon Tetras
(1) Hermit Crab
(100-300) Mealworms
(1) Tetramorium sp. E
(1) Dormymyrmex bicolor
(1) Dormymyrmex insanus
(1) Solenopsis invicta
(1) Formica fusca
(1) Lasius neoniger
(1) Crematogaster cerasi
(1) Myrmecocystus testacus




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