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Care Sheet - Lasius neoniger


26 replies to this topic

#1 Offline Crystals - Posted September 16 2016 - 5:49 PM

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Scientific Name:  Lasius neoniger
 
Distribution:  Widespread across the U.S. and Canada.
 
Queen size:  7-9mm
 
Worker size:  3-5 mm
 
Natural Habitat:  They usually nest under rocks, in sand, but may also be found in rotting wood (including the timbers of houses), at the foot of trees, or in open ground.
 
Circadian Activity:  Mostly nocturnal, but are active in the day as well. 

 

Mating Flight:  They fly anywhere from July to October depending on climate and location. The main flights usually occur in August or September. Has been known to fly on Labor day in September, earning it the nickname of the Labor Day Ant.
 
Queen Founding Method:  The queen is Fully Claustral.
 
Monogyne or Polygyne:  Generally Monogyne, sometimes temporary Polygyne groups can be found, but when the workers eclose they usually choose one queen and kill the rest.
 
Average time from egg to worker:  Egg to Larvae = 15-18 days; Larvae to pupae = 10-15 days, Pupae to worker = 14-18 days. The colonies may grow fairly quickly, depending on the workers present and amount of food supplied.Egg to Larvae = 14 days; Larvae to pupae = 12-15 days, Pupae to worker = 12 days.  They seem to grow very fast in the second year.
 
Recommended Temperature:  65-75F (18-24C)
 
Recommended Humidity:  They prefer a moister nest.
 
Preferred Foods: Meal worms, Honey water. Most sugary foods and insects are readily accepted.   Species: http://www.formicult...ood-by-species/

Hibernation Details:  In the wild temperatures below freezing are common, even up to -40C/F. In captivity it is advised to stay above the freezing point as we are unable to easily duplicate the slow cool down into freezing temperatures. Hibernation is recommended between 39F (4C) - 50F (10C).
 
Escape Barrier Methods:  Fluon and talcum powder method work best.
 
Difficulty rating:  Very easy to keep.
 
Bite and/or Sting rating:  They are too small to inflict any pain.
 
Special Care or Interesting Notes:  They are escape artists, make sure there are no tiny openings.
 
Additional Links: Antweb https://www.antweb.o...s&name=neoniger

 

Descrpition: Workers of this species are usually dark brown in color, and have relatively large eyes (at least 12 ommatidia in greatest diameter). The scape has several erect hairs, but the extensor surface of the anterior tibia has fewer than 6 erect hairs. The penultimate basal tooth is smaller than the 2 adjacent teeth, and may even be absent, leaving a gap between the other basal teeth.

 

Information submitted by AntsMAN.

 


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#2 Offline Mercutia - Posted September 16 2016 - 5:50 PM

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OMG HIIII CRYS



#3 Offline Kevin - Posted September 16 2016 - 5:50 PM

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Thanks for another helpful post crystals :)


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#4 Offline Sharp - Posted September 22 2016 - 5:35 PM

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Thanks for the post! Is this what one of those ants look like?

 

8IvGU



#5 Offline noebl1 - Posted September 23 2016 - 3:46 AM

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Question on these... I've read they may or may not lay eggs before hibernation their first season.  Not sure which is true (or both.)  Thanks!



#6 Offline Chandlerk - Posted September 24 2016 - 7:44 PM

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Question on these... I've read they may or may not lay eggs before hibernation their first season. Not sure which is true (or both.) Thanks!


I am also wondering about this.

#7 Offline Solenoqueen - Posted October 30 2016 - 10:30 PM

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Nice information sheet!

Another informative sheet, by the one and only Crystal. Thanks, your amazing!


haha ant queen go brr


#8 Offline Nathant2131 - Posted December 29 2016 - 7:35 AM

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Question on these... I've read they may or may not lay eggs before hibernation their first season. Not sure which is true (or both.) Thanks!


I am also wondering about this.

 

 

I believe they often lay only if they had their flights earlier in the year. If they had their flights closer to cold season, they likely will not lay. Cannot give exact months or dates or anything though, I just remember that being said multiple times over the course of my research on Lasius ants. My 9 Lasius queens (in which I believe most are neoniger) have not layed eggs and I caught the bulk of them in early fall, and one or two in very late summer.


Edited by Nathant2131, December 29 2016 - 7:36 AM.


#9 Offline noebl1 - Posted December 29 2016 - 8:02 AM

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Question on these... I've read they may or may not lay eggs before hibernation their first season. Not sure which is true (or both.) Thanks!


I am also wondering about this.

 

 

I believe they often lay only if they had their flights earlier in the year. If they had their flights closer to cold season, they likely will not lay. Cannot give exact months or dates or anything though, I just remember that being said multiple times over the course of my research on Lasius ants. My 9 Lasius queens (in which I believe most are neoniger) have not layed eggs and I caught the bulk of them in early fall, and one or two in very late summer.

 

 

This makes sense.  I caught a couple L. Alienus; mid-summer and then late Fall.  The one fertile L. Alienus laid eggs and had two nanitics just before hibernation and a small pile of larvae, while the others did nothing I caught later.  I also had found under a pot outside this summer the same situation with a L. Alienus founding chamber and a good size pile of eggs.  Left her there, and had burrowed down by the Fall.



#10 Offline Kevin - Posted December 29 2016 - 9:03 AM

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I also have about 20 queens (lasius neoniger) that have not laid but ripped their wings off. From what I've heard they do wait for spring. In parasitic species you can also observe this behavior, the queens fly and mate then make a small chamber to survive winter, then in spring they look for a victim colony.


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#11 Offline MichiganAnts - Posted December 30 2016 - 6:48 PM

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i managed to find a lasius neoniger queen with 7 nanitics and ~10 eggs this fall. its the only one I've found. all the other ~50 lasius queens i've found had no brood or anything.


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#12 Offline AnthonyP163 - Posted January 10 2017 - 10:35 AM

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i managed to find a lasius neoniger queen with 7 nanitics and ~10 eggs this fall. its the only one I've found. all the other ~50 lasius queens i've found had no brood or anything.


they usually hibernate first. You can expect a good 20 colonies in the spring.

#13 Offline Batspiderfish - Posted January 10 2017 - 10:49 AM

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i managed to find a lasius neoniger queen with 7 nanitics and ~10 eggs this fall. its the only one I've found. all the other ~50 lasius queens i've found had no brood or anything.

 

Are we sure this wasn't Lasius alienus or Lasius pallitarsis?


Edited by Batspiderfish, January 10 2017 - 10:50 AM.

If you've enjoyed using my expertise and identifications, please do not create undue ecological risk by releasing your ants. The environment which we keep our pet insects is alien and oftentimes unsanitary, so ensure that wild populations stay safe by giving your ants the best care you can manage for the rest of their lives, as we must do with any other pet.

 

Exotic ants are for those who think that vibrant diversity is something you need to pay money to see. It is illegal to transport live ants across state lines.

 

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#14 Offline brianhershey - Posted January 3 2018 - 5:10 PM

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I caught 4 Lasius neoniger queens after labor day 2016 and none have eggs yet, on a cold shelf for the winter. I moved one queen to a new tube yesterday and she took a very long drink of sugar water! Hopeful come spring :)



#15 Offline Kaelwizard - Posted August 26 2018 - 4:42 PM

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I just caught one now. I wonder if it will lay.



#16 Offline VictorianAntParty - Posted August 30 2018 - 5:55 PM

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I caught 6, I could have caught a hundred or more but I figured 6 was my hard limit. No eggs. 



#17 Online Ants_Dakota - Posted February 15 2020 - 7:49 AM

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I caught 2 Lasius Neoniger in late summer and they both laid eggs. It seems that they grow faster when they have substrate instead of the plastic of a test tube.


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#18 Offline Da_NewAntOnTheBlock - Posted February 15 2020 - 11:23 AM

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You should start and journal. Also, most ants are that way (because then they don't have to worry about spinning there cocoons and if they have enough resources to).


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#19 Offline AntsDakota - Posted February 15 2020 - 11:25 AM

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Some ants use the cotton of their test tubes.


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#20 Offline Da_NewAntOnTheBlock - Posted February 15 2020 - 11:27 AM

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most prefer substrate. It's a better alternative because there isn't the treat of strangling and suffocating your brood to death...


Edited by Da_NewAntOnTheBlock, February 15 2020 - 11:28 AM.

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