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Kiedeerk's Epic multi-species Ant Keeping Journal

kiedeerk journal multi-species ant keeping epic

125 replies to this topic

#21 Offline kiedeerk - Posted July 15 2023 - 1:50 PM

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I have my placadops in two different set ups

One is a horizontal nest with ledges so repletes can hang

The other colonies are in traditional cavern style formicariums

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#22 Offline kiedeerk - Posted July 15 2023 - 4:32 PM

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Odontomachus Clarus are doing great. Numbers are growing nicely with massive brood pile

Close up of brood. All larva of odontomachus sp are spiky

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#23 Offline Jonathan5608 - Posted July 15 2023 - 4:40 PM

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Odontomachus Clarus are doing great. Numbers are growing nicely with massive brood pile

Close up of brood. All larva of odontomachus sp are spiky

Pretty

#24 Offline kiedeerk - Posted July 15 2023 - 4:48 PM

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Camponotus castaneus i feel are one brood cycle away from going into diapause

The small larva are the size of those arrested in diapause

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#25 Offline kiedeerk - Posted July 15 2023 - 4:51 PM

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Pheidole Rhea: they have multiple brood piles everywhere.

Close up of major workers

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#26 Offline Virginian_ants - Posted July 15 2023 - 4:54 PM

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Soo many awesome speices you are so lucky.

#27 Offline Jonathan5608 - Posted July 15 2023 - 5:07 PM

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Camponotus castaneus i feel are one brood cycle away from going into diapause

The small larva are the size of those arrested in diapause

very pretty

#28 Online Ernteameise - Posted July 16 2023 - 12:05 AM

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Wow, I have never seen spiky larvae before!

 

Great colonies!



#29 Offline kiedeerk - Posted July 16 2023 - 7:30 PM

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Pogonomyrmex badius

 

  • The only polymorphic species of pogonormyrmex in the USA. They are native to the southeast USA.
  • Queens are fully claustral. However they do best in test tube set ups with copious amount of moist sand. 
  • They require high heat and humidity in order to thrive. Naturalistic set ups with sand are best however I had great success keeping them in my DIY set ups.
  • They require heat and humidity gradients (ie areas of high and low heat/humidity). Dryer areas are used as seed storage. Moist and warm areas for brood
  • They can be more challenging to found compared to other Pogonomyrmex.
  • Their diet include all different kinds of seeds, crushed nuts, fish flakes, and insects
  • I did not take too many founding pictures however, this colony is thriving with numbers probably exceeding 1000 at this point.
  • Their majors can rival the queen in term of size with larger heads

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#30 Offline kiedeerk - Posted July 21 2023 - 4:22 AM

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M. Placadops 01 growing fast. All the colonies have 30-50 workers now. They are quite easy to care for so far. No random death so far. 

Most people say after 50 workers they tend to stabilize. 

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#31 Offline kiedeerk - Posted July 21 2023 - 4:34 AM

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Odontomachus Haematodus

 

  • Invasive species to southeastern USA from South america. These are some of the largest trap jaw species in the USA similar in size to O. Desertorum. Queens are over 1.2cm and mature workers are easily over 1cm.
  • They have jet black color. Queens are semi claustral and only slightly bigger than mature workers. The only difference in a slightly broader thorax where the wings were.
  • Like other trap jaw species, they are consume proteins in forms of soft bodied insects. In captivity, fruit flies, small crickets, termites are their favorite food. Roaches and meal worms are not as good due to their hard exo-skeleton
  • Some trap jaws only form small colonies, haematodus have been observed to form large colonies.
  • I had this colony for about 2 years, started with solo queen. They reached close to 1000 workers at their peak

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Edited by kiedeerk, July 21 2023 - 4:35 AM.

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#32 Offline Jonathan5608 - Posted July 21 2023 - 7:08 AM

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How’s the yellow form nearcticus

#33 Offline kiedeerk - Posted July 21 2023 - 7:29 AM

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How’s the yellow form nearcticus


Slow progress. This is because it’s a failed queen I had to feed to get her to lay.

Fully claustral queens don’t usually make it once they lose their nanitics


Myrmica queen laid more eggs

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#34 Offline Jonathan5608 - Posted July 21 2023 - 8:54 AM

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How’s the yellow form nearcticus

that’s unfortunate, given how pretty they are. Hopefully you can find one next year.
Slow progress. This is because it’s a failed queen I had to feed to get her to lay.

Fully claustral queens don’t usually make it once they lose their nanitics


Myrmica queen laid more eggs


#35 Offline kiedeerk - Posted July 22 2023 - 6:22 AM

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Aphaenogaster tennessiensis

 

  • The only parasitic aphaenogaster species in my region. They mainly parasitize Aphaenogaster rudis colonies. 
  • The queen is bright orange and very small. Her workers are similar in size to rudis/fulva workers distinguished by their long dorsal spines. 
  • They are abundant although can be localized in certain areas. They like to nest in dead/dry trees, under bark.
  • Once accepted by the rudis workers, queen will lay eggs and produce her own biological workers. After that, the care in the same with any other aphaenogaster species
  • Diet consist mainly of insects, sugar water is not needed although can be supplemented. Seeds/nuts can be used as well as fish flakes.

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#36 Offline kiedeerk - Posted July 25 2023 - 4:23 AM

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Do you have super majors with rhea.


Yes my rhea have many super majors. Worker count north of 15-20k. Super majors are distinguished from majors from their more developed and thicker thorax

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#37 Offline kiedeerk - Posted July 27 2023 - 2:37 PM

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The royalties of my colonies. The most important member of a colony is the queen.

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#38 Online Ernteameise - Posted July 28 2023 - 9:41 AM

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Beautiful pictures



#39 Offline Jonathan5608 - Posted July 28 2023 - 9:50 AM

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The royalties of my colonies. The most important member of a colony is the queen.

amazing how one organism can create an empire in its lifespan.

Edited by Jonathan5608, July 28 2023 - 9:51 AM.


#40 Offline kiedeerk - Posted July 29 2023 - 2:30 PM

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Massive pupae for M placadops. These pupae are the size of Camponotus major pupae

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