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Proper setup for Atta?


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15 replies to this topic

#1 Offline antscientist - Posted October 12 2021 - 12:13 PM

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I have an Atta Texana colony and they are past founding but their fungus garden is still the size of a golf ball. the bottom layer is plaster, the top layer is soil. I also have a hydration tube but I don't see condensation. Maybe I made the plaster all wrong I don't know what's wrong I really need help.



#2 Offline NikolaBale - Posted October 12 2021 - 12:28 PM

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I have no firsthand experience with leafcutters in general but i have done quite a bit of research regarding their care.

Atta in general are really sensitive to sudden change in temperature and moisture or rather the fungus is.

The ants themselves can survive in a much wider range of conditions its the fungus that's very sensitive.

Because of this the moisture needs to be as close to 100% and temperature about 25 celcius with a deviation of +2/-2 degrees.


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#3 Offline mmcguffi - Posted October 12 2021 - 12:38 PM

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Instead of making many separate threads on this topic, I would suggest you first do a bit of research, or at least stick to one thread. Check out my journal that I have previously linked to you, Cheetos thread I linked you, as well as others who have posted their Atta journals here.

 

In general, it is not wise to use soil. From what you have previously mentioned, it also sounds like you have been over-watering by a lot. However, since you have successfully kept the fungus alive for a month, the care can't be that bad. For long term success though I suggest you read those threads that I previously sent you, as they cover the proper care for Atta

 

 

Because of this the moisture needs to be as close to 100% 

This is common "folk wisdom" for Atta care, but in my experience true 100% humidity is detrimental for fungus. This typically means some standing water from condensation which typically melts away the fungus. As long as the fungus is in a typical plaster setup and watered every now and again, that should suffice


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#4 Offline antscientist - Posted October 12 2021 - 12:41 PM

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I have no firsthand experience with leafcutters in general but i have done quite a bit of research regarding their care.

Atta in general are really sensitive to sudden change in temperature and moisture or rather the fungus is.

The ants themselves can survive in a much wider range of conditions its the fungus that's very sensitive.

Because of this the moisture needs to be as close to 100% and temperature about 25 celcius with a deviation of +2/-2 degrees.

the temp In the room is 78 degrees F so I think the temp's fine but I'm not too sure for humidity. The fungus does seem to grow but not too much.



#5 Offline antscientist - Posted October 12 2021 - 12:42 PM

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Instead of making many separate threads on this topic, I would suggest you first do a bit of research, or at least stick to one thread. Check out my journal that I have previously linked to you, Cheetos thread I linked you, as well as others who have posted their Atta journals here.

 

In general, it is not wise to use soil. From what you have previously mentioned, it also sounds like you have been over-watering by a lot. However, since you have successfully kept the fungus alive for a month, the care can't be that bad. For long term success though I suggest you read those threads that I previously sent you, as they cover the proper care for Atta

 

 

Because of this the moisture needs to be as close to 100% 

This is common "folk wisdom" for Atta care, but in my experience true 100% humidity is detrimental for fungus. This typically means some standing water from condensation which typically melts away the fungus. As long as the fungus is in a typical plaster setup and watered every now and again, that should suffice

ok.



#6 Offline mmcguffi - Posted October 12 2021 - 12:45 PM

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I'm sorry if that came off as harsh! I did not mean it that way -- there is already a good amount of information regarding Atta care on Formiculture; I recommend you read up a bit on how other people have kept their Atta first and if you have any specific questions those are more-easily answered :) 



#7 Offline ANTdrew - Posted October 12 2021 - 12:58 PM

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Cheeto wrote a whole guide on it. Search it up in the archives.

"The ants are a people not strong, yet they prepare their meat in the summer." Prov. 30:25  

Keep ordinary ants in extraordinary ways.


#8 Offline NikolaBale - Posted October 12 2021 - 1:00 PM

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I'm sorry if that came off as harsh! I did not mean it that way -- there is already a good amount of information regarding Atta care on Formiculture; I recommend you read up a bit on how other people have kept their Atta first and if you have any specific questions those are more-easily answered :)

No worries i have no practical knowledge in keeping Atta so i definitely have an open mind.But from what i have heard from every keeper of leafcutters the moisture needs to be very high...Around 90% and this needs to be constant.



#9 Offline ANTdrew - Posted October 12 2021 - 1:04 PM

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https://www.formicul...™/?fromsearch=1

"The ants are a people not strong, yet they prepare their meat in the summer." Prov. 30:25  

Keep ordinary ants in extraordinary ways.


#10 Offline mmcguffi - Posted October 12 2021 - 2:24 PM

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I'm sorry if that came off as harsh! I did not mean it that way -- there is already a good amount of information regarding Atta care on Formiculture; I recommend you read up a bit on how other people have kept their Atta first and if you have any specific questions those are more-easily answered :)

No worries i have no practical knowledge in keeping Atta so i definitely have an open mind.But from what i have heard from every keeper of leafcutters the moisture needs to be very high...Around 90% and this needs to be constant.

 

This is more or less true -- in practice though, as long as they are properly housed you shouldn't have to measure the humidity at all. And after a few months they should be able to sustain the proper humidity themselves (...if they are in a proper enclosure)


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#11 Offline NikolaBale - Posted October 12 2021 - 2:35 PM

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I'm sorry if that came off as harsh! I did not mean it that way -- there is already a good amount of information regarding Atta care on Formiculture; I recommend you read up a bit on how other people have kept their Atta first and if you have any specific questions those are more-easily answered :)

No worries i have no practical knowledge in keeping Atta so i definitely have an open mind.But from what i have heard from every keeper of leafcutters the moisture needs to be very high...Around 90% and this needs to be constant.
This is more or less true -- in practice though, as long as they are properly housed you shouldn't have to measure the humidity at all. And after a few months they should be able to sustain the proper humidity themselves (...if they are in a proper enclosure)
Can you elaborate a bit on how they can maintain the humidity themselves? Do you mean by moving wet substrate or something like that?

Sent from my M2004J19C using Tapatalk

#12 Offline CheetoLord02 - Posted October 12 2021 - 3:53 PM

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large Atta colonies get all of the moisture they need from the leaves that they cut. The water content of the leaves will supply their nesting chambers with plenty of humidity. I also can confirm that I never have bothered to measure the exact humidity of my setups and have never had an issue.


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#13 Offline dspdrew - Posted October 12 2021 - 7:00 PM

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Well, if you see condensation, then you know you hit 100%.



#14 Offline antscientist - Posted October 13 2021 - 2:27 AM

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I'm sorry if that came off as harsh! I did not mean it that way -- there is already a good amount of information regarding Atta care on Formiculture; I recommend you read up a bit on how other people have kept their Atta first and if you have any specific questions those are more-easily answered :)

ok.



#15 Offline antscientist - Posted October 13 2021 - 2:29 AM

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I'm sorry if that came off as harsh! I did not mean it that way -- there is already a good amount of information regarding Atta care on Formiculture; I recommend you read up a bit on how other people have kept their Atta first and if you have any specific questions those are more-easily answered :)

No worries i have no practical knowledge in keeping Atta so i definitely have an open mind.But from what i have heard from every keeper of leafcutters the moisture needs to be very high...Around 90% and this needs to be constant.

 

This is more or less true -- in practice though, as long as they are properly housed you shouldn't have to measure the humidity at all. And after a few months they should be able to sustain the proper humidity themselves (...if they are in a proper enclosure)

 

The container I have them in is a snap cap....



#16 Offline antscientist - Posted October 13 2021 - 2:32 AM

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I'm sorry if that came off as harsh! I did not mean it that way -- there is already a good amount of information regarding Atta care on Formiculture; I recommend you read up a bit on how other people have kept their Atta first and if you have any specific questions those are more-easily answered :)

No worries i have no practical knowledge in keeping Atta so i definitely have an open mind.But from what i have heard from every keeper of leafcutters the moisture needs to be very high...Around 90% and this needs to be constant.
This is more or less true -- in practice though, as long as they are properly housed you shouldn't have to measure the humidity at all. And after a few months they should be able to sustain the proper humidity themselves (...if they are in a proper enclosure)
Can you elaborate a bit on how they can maintain the humidity themselves? Do you mean by moving wet substrate or something like that?

Sent from my M2004J19C using Tapatalk

 

Currently I think the ants know their container isn't that humid so I do see a way the ants are trying to keep humidity in. They are placing substrate along the part that the container and the lid meets.


large Atta colonies get all of the moisture they need from the leaves that they cut. The water content of the leaves will supply their nesting chambers with plenty of humidity. I also can confirm that I never have bothered to measure the exact humidity of my setups and have never had an issue.

oh yeah. I forgot.






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