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Growth speed charts


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8 replies to this topic

#1 Offline Max_Connor - Posted July 10 2021 - 11:46 PM

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Hi!

I was just curious if there are any charts/lists/topics that show how fast colonies of different species grow up to a certain point, e.g. average time for a colony to grow from a single queen to 100 workers?

Or if there are some articles/topics where at least all the fastest and slowest growing species are listed...



#2 Offline Zeiss - Posted July 11 2021 - 12:04 AM

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There are no such things because colony growth depends on multiple factors such as temperature, humidity, nutrients, etc.


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#3 Offline Max_Connor - Posted July 11 2021 - 7:42 AM

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There are no such things because colony growth depends on multiple factors such as temperature, humidity, nutrients, etc.

Yeah, it's obvious, but I don't think that you'd argue that Tetramorium sp. grow way faster than many camponotus sp. almost irregardless of nutrients and exact temperature.
There might be some comparison of growing rates given at optimal conditions, that's the point

Edited by Max_Connor, July 11 2021 - 7:42 AM.


#4 Offline Kaelwizard - Posted July 11 2021 - 9:23 AM

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Well there really isn’t. That was the point of what Zeiss said. The care sheets on the forum can give you an idea, but nothing overly specific.

Edited by Kaelwizard, July 11 2021 - 9:23 AM.


#5 Offline Max_Connor - Posted July 11 2021 - 4:49 PM

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Well there really isn’t. That was the point of what Zeiss said. The care sheets on the forum can give you an idea, but nothing overly specific.



So I will create one myself!

#6 Offline CheetoLord02 - Posted July 11 2021 - 5:29 PM

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Honestly, if you were able to control things like temperature, egg to worker time could be pretty easily monitored. Especially in founding queens where food isn't necessarily a factor. Recently a heated Liometopum luctuosum queen had an egg to worker of only 20 days in nanitics; the fastest I've ever seen. The issue is to get consistent numbers you'd need large sample groups, a number of queens kept at varying temperatures, and probably at least 3 queens per temperature level. However growth rate as an established colony is practically impossible to guage scientifically.


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#7 Offline smares - Posted July 11 2021 - 9:54 PM

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You might try looking up journals at a university library, they have access to all or most research papers and you can just pull them up online. All these journals have a pay walls otherwise.

#8 Offline Zeiss - Posted July 11 2021 - 10:35 PM

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You might try looking up journals at a university library, they have access to all or most research papers and you can just pull them up online. All these journals have a pay walls otherwise.

To get around the paywalls, most of the time professors will just give you the PDF if you email them.



#9 Offline Max_Connor - Posted July 12 2021 - 12:58 AM

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You might try looking up journals at a university library, they have access to all or most research papers and you can just pull them up online. All these journals have a pay walls otherwise.



Yeah, this would be the most reliable way to do it




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