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Keeping two different species of ants together (Ponera pennsylvanica, and Lasius sp.

keeping ants two different species ponera pennsylvanica lasius

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#1 Offline Ants4fun - Posted May 9 2015 - 7:59 PM

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Since I have four colonies of Ponera pennsylvanica and one could easily get a colony under a rock, I decided to test this idea out. I boosted my Lasius colony with about 100-300 larvae. This was in case I observed the Ponera eating brood, as an article suggested that they might prey on other ants brood.

In my area, both of these ants are fairly common, and you can often see the Ponera close by the Lasius. Why? I am hoping this experiment will show. In a test tube I will have a small Lasius color, connected to an outsold. The substrate will be mostly sand. Inside the foraging area I have constructed a small dirt nest, where I can see all the actions of the Ponera colony, while keeping the Lasius out. I will post pictures later.

I would like to see everyone's hypothesis on this experiment. I want to see there interactions at food stations, while foraging, and possibly the Ponera inside the Lasius's test tube. Both have a strong feeding reply to fruit flies, so I should see some competition. The Ponera also like ByFormica food and mealworms. What do you think will happen? (I am going to try to get an extension tube for my Nikon d7000 for pics... If not I will have to find something else)



Edit: corrected spelling mistakes to make my post somewhat understandable

Edited by Ants4fun, May 11 2015 - 8:25 PM.


#2 Offline drtrmiller - Posted May 9 2015 - 8:31 PM

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It's something to try.  Many species cohabitate the same general area with little to no aggression.  

 

This association is most common where there is a considerable size difference, such as between Brachymyrmex sp. and the normally aggressive Solenopsis invicta.


 
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#3 Offline Miles - Posted May 9 2015 - 8:38 PM

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I'll be attempting to do something similar with Brachymyrmex and a larger Formicine species this summer, if I'm lucky.


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#4 Offline dspdrew - Posted May 9 2015 - 8:50 PM

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Since I have four colonies of Ponera pennsylvanica and one could easily get a colony under a rock, I decided to test this idea out. I boosted my Lasius corny with about 100-300 larvae in case I observed the Ponera eating brood, which was suggested I an article.

In my area, both of these ants are fairly common, and you can after see the Ponera close by the Lasius. Why? I am hoping this experiment will show. In a test tube I will have a small Lasius color, connected to an outsold. The substrate will be mostly sand. Inside the foraging area I have coo strutted a small dirt nest, where I can see all the actions of the Ponera colony, while keeping the Lasius out. I will post pictures later.

I would like to see everyone's hypothesis on this experiment. I want to see there interactions at food stations, wile foraging, and possible the Ponera inside the Lasius's test tube. Both have a strong feeding reply to fruit flies, so I should see some competition. The Ponera also like ByFormica food and mealworms. What do you think will happen? (I am going to try to get an extension tube for my Nikon d7000 for pics... If not I will have to find something else)

 

It's hard to follow what you are saying here. Some of this doesn't make any sense to me.

 

Are you saying you want to put two colonies together with the same out world, or put two colonies together in the same nest?



#5 Offline Ants4fun - Posted May 11 2015 - 8:22 PM

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Sorry I was typing on my phone,.. I put them in the same outworld for a while. The results where that the larger Lasius colony actively tried to get inside the Ponera colony, a couple workers got inside in fact, however due to the ponera's small tunnel size, it was very difficult for the Lasius to get around. When they met there was a high aggression rate and later found a Ponera worker dead. Since the Ponera's nest was inside the Lasius's out world, and was clear, they could see them tunneling and tried to get in. I will try this experiment later as well.

Edited by Ants4fun, May 11 2015 - 8:26 PM.






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: keeping, ants, two, different, species, ponera, pennsylvanica, lasius

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