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What in the world is this?


Best Answer Leo , August 16 2020 - 9:47 PM

Lacewing larvae Go to the full post


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3 replies to this topic

#1 Offline ConcordAntman - Posted August 16 2020 - 9:45 PM

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I believe this tiny arthropod is on a False Virginia Creeper or Porcelainberry. It doesn’t look like a Cottony Cushion Scale but it might be a Woolly Aphid nymph. It’s about 5 mm long and appears to have bits of fuzz and detritus adorning it’s exoskeleton. I’m clueless. Suggestions appreciated!

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Edited by ConcordAntman, August 16 2020 - 9:48 PM.

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#2 Offline Leo - Posted August 16 2020 - 9:47 PM   Best Answer

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Lacewing larvae

#3 Offline ConcordAntman - Posted August 16 2020 - 9:54 PM

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That sure was quick! Thanks Leo :hi:


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#4 Offline ponerinecat - Posted September 2 2020 - 7:49 PM

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Funny little things, lacewings. Recently found one with a detritus shield made entirely of dead bodies(L humile mostly) instead of the usual dirt and debris. The group is surprisingly diverse as well, finding a lot of very different species at my blacklight.


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