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Queen from central Europe on June 2nd 2020

queen formica id parasitic europe red

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10 replies to this topic

#1 Offline Quizzie - Posted June 2 2020 - 1:30 PM

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Hi! Could someone please help me identify this queen?
I'm guessing she's a parasitic queen from the Formica rufa group.
 
Location of collection: Czech Republic
Date of collection: August 2nd 2020
Habitat of collection: park on city edge
Length: about 12 mm
Coloration: black with a red underside
Behavior: active, aggressive, fast and strong
 
X5ABvCE.jpg

Edited by Quizzie, June 2 2020 - 1:35 PM.

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Formica cinerea (queen of 2018)

Formica rufibarbis (queen of 2019)

Formica pratensis? (queen of 2020)


#2 Offline Antkid12 - Posted June 2 2020 - 1:30 PM

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 Yup! looks like a Formica rufa group queen, nice catch!


Edited by Antkid12, June 2 2020 - 1:33 PM.

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Ants I have: Tapinoma sessile(2 queen colony). RED MORPH Camponotus neacticus(now has pupae!), Tetramorium immigrans (x3), Aphaenogaster sp, Temnothorax sp, Brachymyrmex sp.   possibly infertile   :(,  Ponera pennsylvanica, and Pheidole morrisi!  :yahoo: 

 

Other insects: Polistes sp. Queen

                    

Ants I need: Pheidole sp., Trachymyrmex sp., Crematogaster cerasi , Dorymyrmex sp. Most wanted: Pheidole morrisii

 

                    

                   

 

 


#3 Offline Quizzie - Posted June 2 2020 - 1:39 PM

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 Yup! looks like a Formica rufa group queen, nice catch!

 

Awesome, thank you!

It's a bit funny... last year I accidentally caught a Formica rufa group queen on June 3rd, just one day later than this year. Unfortunately she died and I've spent the whole summer looking for another one, without any luck.


Formica cinerea (queen of 2018)

Formica rufibarbis (queen of 2019)

Formica pratensis? (queen of 2020)


#4 Offline Antennal_Scrobe - Posted June 4 2020 - 2:55 PM

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Formica rufa and F. polyctena are protected species in the EU. I'm not sure about other close relatives, but I think you could potentially get in trouble for keeping this queen depending on the species.


Currently keeping:

 

Tetramorium immigrans, Pogonomyrmex occidentalis

Myrmica punctiventris, Formica sp.

Formica pallidefulva

Camponotus pennsylvanicus

Camponotus nearcticus

Crematogaster cerasi

Temnothorax ambiguus

Prenolepis imparis


#5 Offline Quizzie - Posted June 5 2020 - 10:36 PM

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Formica rufa and F. polyctena are protected species in the EU. I'm not sure about other close relatives, but I think you could potentially get in trouble for keeping this queen depending on the species.

 

Yep, she's definitely protected. In fact I think all Formica species are protected in the Czech republic.

 

But I can't imagine authorities ever finding out about it. And morally I think I'm fine with it too. Formica rufa group colonies are pretty common around here. And like 99% of all queens in nature don't make it anyway, right?


Formica cinerea (queen of 2018)

Formica rufibarbis (queen of 2019)

Formica pratensis? (queen of 2020)


#6 Offline Barristan - Posted June 6 2020 - 2:10 AM

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Formica rufa and F. polyctena are protected species in the EU. I'm not sure about other close relatives, but I think you could potentially get in trouble for keeping this queen depending on the species.

 

There is no general EU law which protects them.

 

Every country has its own laws. In some countries (for example Austria) it is different depending on the state you are in.

 

In the UK for example Formica rufa aren't protected and you may catch and keep them.


Edited by Barristan, June 6 2020 - 2:10 AM.

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#7 Offline Antennal_Scrobe - Posted June 6 2020 - 8:33 AM

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Formica rufa and F. polyctena are protected species in the EU. I'm not sure about other close relatives, but I think you could potentially get in trouble for keeping this queen depending on the species.

 

Yep, she's definitely protected. In fact I think all Formica species are protected in the Czech republic.

 

But I can't imagine authorities ever finding out about it. And morally I think I'm fine with it too. Formica rufa group colonies are pretty common around here. And like 99% of all queens in nature don't make it anyway, right?

 

I still wouldn't. Formica rufa are social parasites, so you will need brood from a host species like Formica fusca. I would be surprised if any non social parasite Formica was protected, as as far as I know, none of them are endangered at all. I tried to find a list of protected species in the Czech Republic, but I wasn't successful.


Currently keeping:

 

Tetramorium immigrans, Pogonomyrmex occidentalis

Myrmica punctiventris, Formica sp.

Formica pallidefulva

Camponotus pennsylvanicus

Camponotus nearcticus

Crematogaster cerasi

Temnothorax ambiguus

Prenolepis imparis


#8 Offline Barristan - Posted June 6 2020 - 9:49 AM

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Unfortunately there are some crazy laws (some Austrian states have them...) that protect every Formica species, so even the very common Formica fusca may not be kept. But I haven't heard of any case that someone had to pay a fee or was punished in any way because he/she kept Formica fusca. 


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#9 Offline Antennal_Scrobe - Posted June 6 2020 - 10:13 AM

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I see. So kind of like the weird "plant pest" laws in the USA.


Currently keeping:

 

Tetramorium immigrans, Pogonomyrmex occidentalis

Myrmica punctiventris, Formica sp.

Formica pallidefulva

Camponotus pennsylvanicus

Camponotus nearcticus

Crematogaster cerasi

Temnothorax ambiguus

Prenolepis imparis


#10 Online AntsDakota - Posted June 6 2020 - 10:16 AM

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Formica rufa and F. polyctena are protected species in the EU. I'm not sure about other close relatives, but I think you could potentially get in trouble for keeping this queen depending on the species.

 
Yep, she's definitely protected. In fact I think all Formica species are protected in the Czech republic.
 
But I can't imagine authorities ever finding out about it. And morally I think I'm fine with it too. Formica rufa group colonies are pretty common around here. And like 99% of all queens in nature don't make it anyway, right?
I still wouldn't. Formica rufa are social parasites, so you will need brood from a host species like Formica fusca. I would be surprised if any non social parasite Formica was protected, as as far as I know, none of them are endangered at all. I tried to find a list of protected species in the Czech Republic, but I wasn't successful.
Social parasites are actually fascinating to keep. If the queen and hosts accept, she’ll produce a larger colony than any normal Formica, with large majors.
"God made..... all the creatures that move along the ground according to their kinds. (including ants) And God saw that it was good. Genesis 1:25 NIV versionCurrently Keeping: Aphaenogaster picea, Aphaenogaster rudis, Camponotus pennsylvanicus, Formica subsericea, Lasius americanus, Lasius aphidicola, Myrmica sp., Pogonomyrmex occidentalis, Ponera pennsylvanica ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________My Journal__________________________________________________________________________________________<p>Attention South Dakotans! Join us on The SoDAK (Society of Dakotan Ant Keepers)

#11 Offline Quizzie - Posted June 6 2020 - 10:38 AM

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I still wouldn't. Formica rufa are social parasites, so you will need brood from a host species like Formica fusca. I would be surprised if any non social parasite Formica was protected, as as far as I know, none of them are endangered at all. I tried to find a list of protected species in the Czech Republic, but I wasn't successful.

 

 

Yes, I know. Social parasites are really interesting to me. I gave the queen 10 pupae I stole from my Formica rufibarbis colony. Fingers crossed!

I just confirmed that all Formica are protected (the link is in Czech, but if you wan't to see for yourself, you can Google translate): https://www.zakonypr....cz/cs/1992-395

 

 

 

Unfortunately there are some crazy laws (some Austrian states have them...) that protect every Formica species, so even the very common Formica fusca may not be kept. But I haven't heard of any case that someone had to pay a fee or was punished in any way because he/she kept Formica fusca. 

 

Yep, exactly. It's dumb. The ground here is literally covered by different Formica ants (mostly rufibarbis). I currently keep only Formica colonies as they are the most interesting local species to me - Formica cinerea, Formica rufibarbis and now Formica pratensis/rufa/polyctena.


Formica cinerea (queen of 2018)

Formica rufibarbis (queen of 2019)

Formica pratensis? (queen of 2020)






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