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How Japanese honeybees kill the invading giant hornet


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9 replies to this topic

#1 Offline OhNoNotAgain - Posted May 4 2020 - 4:25 PM

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So I tried looking up "murder hornet" in Japanese, and all I could find were references to killer bees (the Africanized honeybee).

After some more digging I believe the much-ballyhooed murder hornet is actually called the Giant Sparrow Hornet/Wasp in Japanese ( https://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/オオスズメバチ   for anyone interested). Normal hornets are called sparrow hornets/wasps anyway (Japanese doesn't really distinguish in the base word "hachi" among bees, wasps, and hornets). People are making jokes about the giant hornet in America now, but in Japan they are apparently the number one cause of wildlife-triggered death. It's only funny as long as your family isn't the one that draws the short straw.

 

But I did find this article about how Asian honeybees (Apis cerana according to the above wiki article) have developed a defense against the hornet, something the European A. mellifera cannot do: cooking the scouts. This is really, really cool. Check out the Nat Geo video embedded in this article for how they signal each other, etc. 

 

EDIT: Speaking of which, apparently the giant hornet starts up a warning rattling sound in their nest when an intruder comes too close. If you hear what looks like a hornet nest rattling, stay far away.

 

https://www.foxnews....r-hornet-report


Edited by OhNoNotAgain, May 4 2020 - 4:33 PM.

  • BugFinder, Ant_Dude2908, AntsDakota and 1 other like this

Veromessor pergandei x2

Veromessor andrei

Camponotus fragilis

Camponotus sansabeanus

Tetramorium x2 (No I didn't want 2 colonies ... long story)

Prenolepis imparis queens in tubes

Termitat: Zootermopsis angusticollis

And bunches of isopods (various Armadillidium, C. murina, P. hoffmannseggi, P. haasi, V. parvus) and hordes of springtails

 


#2 Offline PacificNorthWestern - Posted May 4 2020 - 7:33 PM

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I swear, if I see one of these hornets anywhere near where I live...



#3 Offline ponerinecat - Posted May 5 2020 - 8:02 AM

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Ill keep it as a specimen. Would be a cool find.



#4 Offline NickAnter - Posted May 5 2020 - 8:14 AM

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I would blowtorch(we have a giant one) it, and their nest if possible.


Colonies:Nylanderia vividula

Lasius cf. americanus

Founding queens:

Camponotus hyatti/sayi

Temnothorax nevadensis

Brachymyrmex patagonicus

Pheidole navigans

Solenopsis sp. 1

Solenopsis sp.2

Monomorium cf. minimum.


#5 Offline AntsDakota - Posted May 5 2020 - 8:42 AM

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I probably wouldn't go anywhere near the nest, and call pest control.


"God made..... all the creatures that move along the ground according to their kinds. (including ants) And God saw that it was good. Genesis 1:25 NIV versionCurrently Keeping: Aphaenogaster picea, Aphaenogaster rudis, Camponotus pennsylvanicus, Formica subsericea, Lasius americanus, Lasius aphidicola, Myrmica sp., Pogonomyrmex occidentalis, Ponera pennsylvanica ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________My Journal__________________________________________________________________________________________<p>Attention South Dakotans! Join us on The SoDAK (Society of Dakotan Ant Keepers)

#6 Offline ponerinecat - Posted May 5 2020 - 8:47 AM

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I would blowtorch(we have a giant one) it, and their nest if possible.

And that's how to get killed. Too many stings can literally cause heart failure. No need to disturb them at all.



#7 Offline NickAnter - Posted May 5 2020 - 9:05 AM

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Notice I said if possible. If it was a large nest, I would never do that. Only if it was a queen and like 2 workers.


Colonies:Nylanderia vividula

Lasius cf. americanus

Founding queens:

Camponotus hyatti/sayi

Temnothorax nevadensis

Brachymyrmex patagonicus

Pheidole navigans

Solenopsis sp. 1

Solenopsis sp.2

Monomorium cf. minimum.


#8 Offline AntsDakota - Posted May 5 2020 - 9:22 AM

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I would blowtorch(we have a giant one) it, and their nest if possible.

And that's how to get killed. Too many stings can literally cause heart failure. No need to disturb them at all.

 

 

I probably wouldn't go anywhere near the nest, and call pest control.

And this is how to not get killed.........


Edited by AntsDakota, May 5 2020 - 9:22 AM.

"God made..... all the creatures that move along the ground according to their kinds. (including ants) And God saw that it was good. Genesis 1:25 NIV versionCurrently Keeping: Aphaenogaster picea, Aphaenogaster rudis, Camponotus pennsylvanicus, Formica subsericea, Lasius americanus, Lasius aphidicola, Myrmica sp., Pogonomyrmex occidentalis, Ponera pennsylvanica ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________My Journal__________________________________________________________________________________________<p>Attention South Dakotans! Join us on The SoDAK (Society of Dakotan Ant Keepers)

#9 Offline zantezaint - Posted May 10 2020 - 4:34 PM

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Amazing video. Getting barbecued alive is one way to go...


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#10 Offline OhNoNotAgain - Posted May 11 2020 - 9:15 PM

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I really liked how the bees coordinated with each other. Like "Ready ... on your marks ... get set ...."

Oh and then one of them is like, "I can't wait any more. Charrrgge!"


Edited by OhNoNotAgain, May 11 2020 - 9:20 PM.

  • zantezaint likes this

Veromessor pergandei x2

Veromessor andrei

Camponotus fragilis

Camponotus sansabeanus

Tetramorium x2 (No I didn't want 2 colonies ... long story)

Prenolepis imparis queens in tubes

Termitat: Zootermopsis angusticollis

And bunches of isopods (various Armadillidium, C. murina, P. hoffmannseggi, P. haasi, V. parvus) and hordes of springtails

 





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