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Oregon Anting Thread


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#1 Offline Andrewslatter - Posted January 10 2020 - 8:11 PM

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So lets start an Oregon thread. If ya live in oregon and are anting please post here "the more info the better, pics nice too". Its gonna be a great Anting year I can feel it in my exoskeleton Lol :D

Edited by Andrewslatter, January 10 2020 - 8:12 PM.

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#2 Offline TennesseeAnts - Posted January 11 2020 - 6:08 AM

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I used to live 2.5-3 hours away from Portland. Prenolepis imparis and parasitic Formica will fly first. I would check for Prenolepis imparis on the first 70 degree day, from early morning to noon. For the parasitic Formica, warm, sunny days in April worked for me.
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#3 Offline Andrewslatter - Posted January 18 2020 - 12:26 PM

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Thanks ant_dude great tip. I am super excited about impairs. I have located a few key spots for nuptial flights. Got my tubes ready at all time. Hoping to score several, I hear they survive better together as a polygyne colony. We will soon find out! :)
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#4 Offline AntsDakota - Posted January 18 2020 - 4:06 PM

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I knew they were polygynous, but the behavior being better in terms of survival is very rare among ant species.


Edited by AntsDakota, January 18 2020 - 4:07 PM.

"God made..... all the creatures that move along the ground according to their kinds. (including ants) And God saw that it was good. Genesis 1:25 NIV version


#5 Offline Andrewslatter - Posted January 19 2020 - 2:12 PM

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Yeah I have heard that also. Seems like the census is the two year mark is were everyone has the colony die out. But I'm gonna try something different. Check out new post in general antkeeping...

#6 Offline Andrewslatter - Posted April 8 2020 - 1:50 PM

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found me a camponotus nova under a rock in garibaldi oregon. she has also just laid eggs YAY!!!  :yahoo:

 

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#7 Offline AntsDakota - Posted April 8 2020 - 1:53 PM

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That is a Formica sp. queen. It looks like F. pacifica to me.


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"God made..... all the creatures that move along the ground according to their kinds. (including ants) And God saw that it was good. Genesis 1:25 NIV version


#8 Offline TennesseeAnts - Posted April 8 2020 - 2:15 PM

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found me a camponotus nova under a rock in garibaldi oregon. she has also just laid eggs YAY!!!  :yahoo:


That seems to be Formica pacifica.

#9 Offline Andrewslatter - Posted April 8 2020 - 4:44 PM

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copy that, formica pacifica it is... Double YAY!!!  :yahoo:  :yahoo:

"she's a queen, Willow"  :king:



#10 Offline AntPerson - Posted May 3 2020 - 10:29 PM

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Does anybody know of good places to hunt for ants in Oregon? I wanna start my first ant colony.
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#11 Offline Antliebe - Posted May 29 2020 - 10:46 AM

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Same here @AntPerson.  We would also love to know of good places to hunt for ants in Oregon.  We are in the Portland area and been hunting for queens around wildlife areas, etc.  Any tips appreciated.  :)



#12 Offline AntsDakota - Posted May 29 2020 - 4:12 PM

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Colonies can usually be found in old, rotting twigs, logs, and stumps, as well as under stones, especially in wildlife areas.
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"God made..... all the creatures that move along the ground according to their kinds. (including ants) And God saw that it was good. Genesis 1:25 NIV version


#13 Offline OmniusClone - Posted June 5 2020 - 1:49 AM

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I've had a fairly long hiatus from posting in this forum, for personal/life reasons, but I figured I'd make a reintroduction here, as I've spent the last few years living in Oregon.

I was in the Medford/Central Point area. All the surrounding woodland and parkland up there is prime anting territory, especially for Componotus. Out past Eagle Point, towards the National Forest and around the Volcanic Tubes is where I would wander for the most part. I'd also try in Jacksonville, along the trails behind Britt Park.

In the city, at least where I was in a fairly new development, was rife with Tetramorium immigrans. On the right day you can pocket your limit and still have only taken a very small percentage of what's on the ground.

Didn't have any luck with the Compies, unfortunately ( they're so cool!), but the pavement ants were great to keep. Very hardy, very productive, not picky eaters.

Lots of other species, of course, and in general there's no lack of territory to explore. I only had a handful of chances to hike around. Never had a chance to see what the land around the Illinois had to offer.

Anyway, that's what I found in my very amateur and not so diligent outings. I miss Oregon, and I don't think I'm done with it for good. I might be back there before too long.

Happy Anting everyone!
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#14 Online TacticalHandleGaming - Posted May 24 2021 - 4:22 AM

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I know this thread has been silent for almost a year, but I wanted to reach out to any other Oregon people out there. I know of a few others, and there is a regional facebook group.

 

But if anyone is interested in looking for Queens together, or overall chatting. I figure this is still a great spot for it. I know our state has a lot of fun species, and I've been lucky enough to catch a few different ones.


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Currently kept species

L. neoniger, P. occidentalis, C. modoc, C. novaeboracensis, T. immigrans, B. depilis, A. occidentalis

 

Previously kept species

P. imparis, T. rugatulus


#15 Online TacticalHandleGaming - Posted January 14 2022 - 11:08 AM

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Just a reminder for any Oregon people. I'm always glad to help new people find queens, and we will be coming up on nuptial flight season before we know it. The Facebook group for the PNW is fairly active as well. 


Currently kept species

L. neoniger, P. occidentalis, C. modoc, C. novaeboracensis, T. immigrans, B. depilis, A. occidentalis

 

Previously kept species

P. imparis, T. rugatulus





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