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Strumigenys in Wisconsin

strumigenys wisconsin anting cryptic

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#21 Offline Antennal_Scrobe - Posted August 31 2019 - 2:19 PM

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Mundane ants are cool. The stunning Camponotus chromaiodes can be found through most of eastern North America. Crematogaster are some of the weirdest ants out there, and there are probably some in my neighbor's kitchen right now. Prenolepis is so interesting. It's a tropical Southeast Asian ant genus but one random species fills a strange and otherwise empty niche in my own front yard.


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Currently keeping:

 

Tetramorium immigrans, Pogonomyrmex occidentalis

Myrmica punctiventris, Formica subsericea

Formica pallidefulva, Aphaeogaster cf. rudis

Camponotus pennsylvanicus

Camponotus nearcticus

Crematogaster cerasi

Temnothorax ambiguus

Prenolepis imparis


#22 Offline ponerinecat - Posted August 31 2019 - 2:59 PM

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US is good for anting, UK can import



#23 Offline NickAnter - Posted August 31 2019 - 3:06 PM

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US is good for anting, UK can import

I like UKs native ant species!  Lasius flavus, Solenopsis fugax, Myrmica rubra, Temnothorax nylanderi and Lasius fuginosus being my favorites.


Edited by NickAnter, August 31 2019 - 3:06 PM.

Hi there! I went on a 6 month or so hiatus, in part due, and in part cause of the death of my colonies. 

However, I went back to the Sierras, and restarted my collection, which is now as follows:

Aphaenogaster uinta, Camponotus vicinus, Camponotus modoc, Formica cf. aserva, Formica cf. micropthalma, Formica cf. manni, Formica subpolita, Formica cf. subaenescens, Lasius americanus, Manica invidia, Pogonomyrmex salinus, Pogonomyrmex sp. 1, Solenopsis validiuscula, & Solenopsis sp. 3 (new Sierra variant). 


#24 Offline ponerinecat - Posted August 31 2019 - 3:29 PM

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Myrmica rubra is not native



#25 Offline NickAnter - Posted August 31 2019 - 5:42 PM

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In the UK Myrmica rubra is native.


Hi there! I went on a 6 month or so hiatus, in part due, and in part cause of the death of my colonies. 

However, I went back to the Sierras, and restarted my collection, which is now as follows:

Aphaenogaster uinta, Camponotus vicinus, Camponotus modoc, Formica cf. aserva, Formica cf. micropthalma, Formica cf. manni, Formica subpolita, Formica cf. subaenescens, Lasius americanus, Manica invidia, Pogonomyrmex salinus, Pogonomyrmex sp. 1, Solenopsis validiuscula, & Solenopsis sp. 3 (new Sierra variant). 


#26 Offline ponerinecat - Posted August 31 2019 - 7:26 PM

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I thought you ment US



#27 Offline AnthonyP163 - Posted August 31 2019 - 9:56 PM

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I have heard that Strumigenys can be found in Wisconsin, though I have never seen them myself. Which species occur and how might I find them? I have an idea on how to house cryptic ants, basically a large hydrostone nest with lots of small chambers and no outworld, populated by springtails. Of course I actually have to find the appropriate ants before I can test this.

The Strumigenys I have found have all been underneath rocks or logs, either during light rain or after. They like humidity and moisture. I was told to look for them where springtails are. 

 

Worker specimens that I have sent to Dr. Guenard have been imaged and a match couldn't be found yet. It's a possibility that it's a new species but nothing is for sure yet. 

 

Oh wow. Did they have long or short mandibles?

 

Short.


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Ant Keeping & Ethology Discord - 2000+ Members and growing

Statesideants.com - order live ants legally in the US

 


#28 Offline Leo - Posted August 31 2019 - 10:58 PM

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Where do you guys find stigmatomma? I have no trouble finding other rare species like paratopula and Gesomyrmex, but I have never once in my life seen stigmatomma.


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#29 Offline Antennal_Scrobe - Posted September 1 2019 - 9:38 AM

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Stigmatomma pallipes is pretty common in Wisconsin. The surefire way to find them is to turn over rocks and logs in Northern Wisconsin forests. I think they really live all over the state, though, because I saw one in my friend's backyard once. It's always a bit of a shock to lift something up and find them inches from your fingers; I hear a sting from one of them feels like a hot needle in your hand. Luckily they aren't aggressive.


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Currently keeping:

 

Tetramorium immigrans, Pogonomyrmex occidentalis

Myrmica punctiventris, Formica subsericea

Formica pallidefulva, Aphaeogaster cf. rudis

Camponotus pennsylvanicus

Camponotus nearcticus

Crematogaster cerasi

Temnothorax ambiguus

Prenolepis imparis






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: strumigenys, wisconsin, anting, cryptic

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