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Vendayn's Desert subterranean termite colony (1-30-2015)


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#1 Offline Vendayn - Posted January 30 2015 - 5:03 PM

Vendayn

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So, went looking for ants and got Desert subterranean termites instead. :) A bunch of wood (about 8 medium sized pieces) with termites inside it. I am not sure how many termites I got, but I don't think I got any secondary reproductives. I "hope" I didn't get alates or they'll fly everywhere...but I doubt I got any of those. Not a big deal not having reproductives or the queen, as the little workers I got will turn into reproductives in 6 months anyway. Then after that, another 6 months for the first workers. Which at that point, I should start seeing a lot of termites after a year. My last colony (they were Arid-land subterranean termites though) got HUGE after a year. My colony of them had over 500 new little nymphs roaming around after having them for a year. Desert subterranean termites should be about the same, depending how many secondary reproductives they get.

 

In the next few hours, I'll have a better idea of how many termites I have. It seems like I might have got more than I thought, but termites do tend to pack themselves tightly together in wood.

 

The only problem I might end up having is the plastic isn't that great quality, so they could eat their way out. I'll just have to get a glass tank if they do. It won't happen that fast (if they do).



#2 Offline Vendayn - Posted January 30 2015 - 6:07 PM

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One thing I can say, my wife likes them more than my Pheidole megacephala colony. She likes how they look more she said.

 

Both are pretty cool and the termites will be relaxing to watch, and I love my P. megacephala colony...but, guess she likes termites more. :P


Edited by Vendayn, January 30 2015 - 6:07 PM.


#3 Offline dspdrew - Posted January 30 2015 - 6:08 PM

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I keep my termites in plastic without problems.



#4 Offline Vendayn - Posted January 30 2015 - 7:54 PM

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What kind of plastic? Acrylic and weaker they can chew through, but polycarbonate (and stronger plastics) they can not. At least, that is my understanding...it can take a long time for them to chew through weaker plastics. And, it only becomes a problem if they get a really big colony (not so much small ones).



#5 Offline dspdrew - Posted January 31 2015 - 12:09 PM

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I think they're polystyrene, which is similar to acrylic, only slightly softer/weaker (can be easily scratched). I find it hard to believe that anything the size of a termite can chew through hard plastics like acrylic, as well as some of the flexible ones like polypropylene.






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