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polygynous species of south carolina


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11 replies to this topic

#1 Offline ForestDragon - Posted May 17 2019 - 4:42 AM

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I would like to ask what species within South carolina are polygynous?



#2 Offline ForestDragon - Posted May 17 2019 - 4:51 AM

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i accidently made 2 idk how sorry,  you can delete one if you like



#3 Offline Ferox_Formicae - Posted May 17 2019 - 4:56 AM

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There are many, many polygynous species here. I'll make a list:

 

  • A few Aphaenogaster spp.
  • Brachymyrmex spp.
  • Brachyponera chinensis
  • Camponotus spp. to some degree
  • Colobopsis spp.
  • Crematogaster spp.
  • Rarely Cyphomyrmex rimosus
  • Formica spp.
  • Hypoponera spp.
  • Linepithema humile
  • Monomorium spp.
  • Myrmecina americana
  • Myrmica spp.
  • Nylanderia spp?
  • Paratrechina longicornis
  • Some Pheidole spp.
  • Prenolepis imparis
  • Ponera pennsylvanica
  • Pseudomyrmex spp.
  • Solenopsis spp.
  • Strumigenys spp.
  • Tapinoma spp.
  • Technomyrmex difficilis
  • Temnothorax spp.
  • Tetramorium spp?
  • Rarely Trachymyrmex septentrionalis

Edited by CloudtheDinosaurKing, May 17 2019 - 4:57 AM.

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#4 Offline Ant_Dude2908 - Posted May 17 2019 - 6:36 AM

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There are many, many polygynous species here. I'll make a list:
 

  • A few Aphaenogaster spp.
  • Brachymyrmex spp.
  • Brachyponera chinensis
  • Camponotus spp. to some degree
  • Colobopsis spp.
  • Crematogaster spp.
  • Rarely Cyphomyrmex rimosus
  • Formica spp.
  • Hypoponera spp.
  • Linepithema humile
  • Monomorium spp.
  • Myrmecina americana
  • Myrmica spp.
  • Nylanderia spp?
  • Paratrechina longicornis
  • Some Pheidole spp.
  • Prenolepis imparis
  • Ponera pennsylvanica
  • Pseudomyrmex spp.
  • Solenopsis spp.
  • Strumigenys spp.
  • Tapinoma spp.
  • Technomyrmex difficilis
  • Temnothorax spp.
  • Tetramorium spp?
  • Rarely Trachymyrmex septentrionalis

You should add this to the list of species in South Carolina. And Tennessee!

#5 Offline Ferox_Formicae - Posted May 17 2019 - 6:39 AM

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Maybe... ;)


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#6 Offline ForestDragon - Posted May 17 2019 - 7:14 AM

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There are many, many polygynous species here. I'll make a list:

 

  • A few Aphaenogaster spp.
  • Brachymyrmex spp.
  • Brachyponera chinensis
  • Camponotus spp. to some degree
  • Colobopsis spp.
  • Crematogaster spp.
  • Rarely Cyphomyrmex rimosus
  • Formica spp.
  • Hypoponera spp.
  • Linepithema humile
  • Monomorium spp.
  • Myrmecina americana
  • Myrmica spp.
  • Nylanderia spp?
  • Paratrechina longicornis
  • Some Pheidole spp.
  • Prenolepis imparis
  • Ponera pennsylvanica
  • Pseudomyrmex spp.
  • Solenopsis spp.
  • Strumigenys spp.
  • Tapinoma spp.
  • Technomyrmex difficilis
  • Temnothorax spp.
  • Tetramorium spp?
  • Rarely Trachymyrmex septentrionalis

 

Wow thanks I'm located in ohio but my cousine is getting into antkeeping and i was going to help her get started when i go down for vacation in a couple weeks and she like polygnous species XD thanks so much dude



#7 Offline ForestDragon - Posted May 17 2019 - 7:28 AM

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There are many, many polygynous species here. I'll make a list:

 

  • A few Aphaenogaster spp.
  • Brachymyrmex spp.
  • Brachyponera chinensis
  • Camponotus spp. to some degree
  • Colobopsis spp.
  • Crematogaster spp.
  • Rarely Cyphomyrmex rimosus
  • Formica spp.
  • Hypoponera spp.
  • Linepithema humile
  • Monomorium spp.
  • Myrmecina americana
  • Myrmica spp.
  • Nylanderia spp?
  • Paratrechina longicornis
  • Some Pheidole spp.
  • Prenolepis imparis
  • Ponera pennsylvanica
  • Pseudomyrmex spp.
  • Solenopsis spp.
  • Strumigenys spp.
  • Tapinoma spp.
  • Technomyrmex difficilis
  • Temnothorax spp.
  • Tetramorium spp?
  • Rarely Trachymyrmex septentrionalis

 

also one more question my cousine wants to know if ants in South Carolina need to hibernate? or if it can be skipped 



#8 Offline Ferox_Formicae - Posted May 17 2019 - 7:50 AM

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It can get pretty cold during the winter, so yes, most species, with the exception of a few, need hibernation.


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#9 Offline Ant_Dude2908 - Posted May 17 2019 - 7:57 AM

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Same could be said for most Southern states too. Examples of ants that don't hibernate: Tetramorium immagrans, Solenopsis invicta, Tapinoma sessile, ect. Most invasives from warmer countries won't need to hibernate.
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#10 Offline ForestDragon - Posted May 17 2019 - 10:09 AM

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Same could be said for most Southern states too. Examples of ants that don't hibernate: Tetramorium immagrans, Solenopsis invicta, Tapinoma sessile, ect. Most invasives from warmer countries won't need to hibernate.

wait tetramorium immigrans and tapinoma sessile don't hibernate? is that just in the south or up north as well



#11 Online ANTdrew - Posted May 17 2019 - 11:14 AM

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Tetramorium benefit from hibernation and so does their ant-keeper. They get a break from the insanity for a few months!


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"The ants are a people not strong, yet they prepare their meat in the summer." Prov. 30:25


#12 Offline Ant_Dude2908 - Posted May 17 2019 - 1:17 PM

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Same could be said for most Southern states too. Examples of ants that don't hibernate: Tetramorium immagrans, Solenopsis invicta, Tapinoma sessile, ect. Most invasives from warmer countries won't need to hibernate.

wait tetramorium immigrans and tapinoma sessile don't hibernate? is that just in the south or up north as well

It might just be here in the South, because I see Tapinoma active and growing as late as December.




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