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Raleigh North Carolina

id requests

73 replies to this topic

#61 Offline Ant_Dude2908 - Posted June 17 2019 - 12:54 PM

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1st queen is Camponotus nearcticus, or Camponotus caryae. Second might be Nylanderia.

#62 Offline Aaron567 - Posted June 17 2019 - 2:23 PM

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Camponotus nearcticus/caryae (would need closer pictures of the sides of the head), and Brachymyrmex patagonicus for the small queen, due to the back of her head being sharply concave and the length of her gaster. B. obscurior is closest but is a tropical species that has apparently no dense populations outside of Florida and no reports from NC.


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#63 Offline Thatfa666ene - Posted June 27 2019 - 7:59 PM

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Sorry haven't had much time to take any photos. Most of these queens seemed to be virgins still so I have released them. I kept the ones who had laid eggs. 

Good news is I've caught more ants and have taken some better photos. 

I caught this queen at the door at work when I closed. She's very tiny at 5mm. As soon as I got her in the test tube with water she shed her wings and laid that egg.



#64 Offline Ant_Dude2908 - Posted June 28 2019 - 4:20 AM

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Looks like either Brachymyrmex or Nylanderia.
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#65 Offline Martialis - Posted June 28 2019 - 5:19 AM

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I’d say B. patagonicus or B. obscurior. I’m leaning toward the former.
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Spoiler

#66 Offline Thatfa666ene - Posted June 28 2019 - 6:43 AM

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There's another one in the same test tube who has not shed her wings or laid any eggs. Will they get along? I need to get a microscope.



#67 Offline Thatfa666ene - Posted July 7 2019 - 1:27 PM

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So I caught this a little while back not sure exactly when. Just noticing now that she's unlike all my other queens. About 7mm.



#68 Offline Ant_Dude2908 - Posted July 7 2019 - 3:31 PM

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Probably Solenopsis invicta x richeri.

#69 Offline Thatfa666ene - Posted July 8 2019 - 2:35 PM

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Probably Solenopsis invicta x richeri.


I need to retake some photos of those ants I caught a couple months ago that were identified as solenopsis Invicta cause they are very different in size. Like double the size.

#70 Offline AntsDakota - Posted July 8 2019 - 3:16 PM

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Looks like a species of Lasius, a social parasite species. It was likely near the Camponotus colony during diapause. Based on the shape of the antennae, and how pilose she is, she may be L. claviger.

Possibly L. interjectus?



#71 Offline AnthonyP163 - Posted July 8 2019 - 5:00 PM

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Looks like a species of Lasius, a social parasite species. It was likely near the Camponotus colony during diapause. Based on the shape of the antennae, and how pilose she is, she may be L. claviger.

Possibly L. interjectus?

 

Lasius claviger.



#72 Offline Thatfa666ene - Posted Yesterday, 10:53 AM

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Found these on a trip to Emerald Isle this week. Caught at night under some lights at a beach house. First one is 1 cm.

 

This one is 7mm. 



#73 Offline Ant_Dude2908 - Posted Yesterday, 10:56 AM

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Lasius americanus and Forlieus sp.

#74 Offline Aaron567 - Posted Yesterday, 11:59 AM

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The 7mm length and ovular head of the second queen points to Dorymyrmex bureni for me. First queen is certainly a Lasius, though.


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