Jump to content

  • Chat
  •  
  •  



Welcome to Formiculture.com!

This is a website for anyone interested in Myrmecology and all aspects of finding, keeping, and studying ants. The site and forum are free to use. Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation points to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!

Photo
- - - - -

F. subsericea not laying eggs... is this a problem?

formica formica subsericea f. subsericea brood eggs

  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 Offline Mettcollsuss - Posted October 22 2017 - 4:26 AM

Mettcollsuss

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,424 posts
  • LocationChicago, IL

A few months back (July), I caught two F. subsericea queens right around the same time. They layed eggs at the same time, brood developed at the same rate, etc. You get the idea. They layed their first batch of eggs at the same time, about five. The eggs turned to larvae, the larvae turned to pupae. They didn't have any other brood. At first I didn't think any thing of it. I assumed that they were waiting until they had workers to care for their eggs. The brood's pupal stage went by very slowly, almost a month and a half until the cocoons eclosed. They both had 5 workers. After this, nothing changed.They never laid the eggs that I thought they were waiting to lay. Another month or two later (now), still no brood. They are being fed plenty of sweets and protein. Does anyone know what's wrong with them? 


Edited by Mettcollsuss, October 22 2017 - 9:56 AM.


#2 Offline Evanthomas89 - Posted October 22 2017 - 4:48 AM

Evanthomas89

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 145 posts
  • LocationHowell, NJ

A few months back (July), I caught two F. subsericea queens right around the same time. They layed eggs at the same time, brood developed at the same rate, etc. You get the idea. They layed their first batch of eggs at the same time, about five. The eggs turned to larvae, the larvae turned to pupae. They didn't have any other brood. At first I didn't think any thing of it. I assumed that they were waiting until they had workers to care for their eggs the pupal stage went by very slowly, almost a month and a half until the cocoons eclosed. They both had 5 workers. After this, nothing changed. They never laid the eggs that I thought they were waiting to lay. Another month or two later (now), still no brood. They are being fed plenty of sweets and protein. Does anyone know what's wrong with them? 

 

I heard Formica don't keep brood over winter so they will stop laying before hibernation. I have a Fomica queen as well, she laid her first single egg, raised it to a worker and has stopped laying. I'm sure she will start back up in spring. Hope this helps! 


  • T.C. and Mettcollsuss like this

Check out my Youtube


#3 Offline FeedTheAnts - Posted October 22 2017 - 6:48 AM

FeedTheAnts

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,238 posts
  • LocationVirginia

 to add to what Evan said it is also worth noting that they don't lay new brood unless there is no larvae(Usually).


  • Evanthomas89 and Mettcollsuss like this

I accidentally froze all my ants 


#4 Offline Mettcollsuss - Posted October 22 2017 - 9:55 AM

Mettcollsuss

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,424 posts
  • LocationChicago, IL

 to add to what Evan said it is also worth noting that they don't lay new brood unless there is no larvae(Usually).

So, they only lay a new batch of eggs when the old one batch is in its pupal stage is what you're saying? Because they don't have any brood, eggs, larvae, or pupae.


  • Evanthomas89 likes this

#5 Offline Mettcollsuss - Posted October 22 2017 - 10:00 AM

Mettcollsuss

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,424 posts
  • LocationChicago, IL

 to add to what Evan said it is also worth noting that they don't lay new brood unless there is no larvae(Usually).

That actually makes sense. When I found a wild Formica colony, They only had pupae, no eggs or larvae that I could see. It's also worth noting that I spotted at least two queens. On the subject of Formica polygyny, will adult colonies fuse, or should queens be introduced during the founding stage? Will colonies accept new queens?


  • Evanthomas89 likes this

#6 Offline Batspiderfish - Posted October 22 2017 - 10:52 AM

Batspiderfish

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,614 posts
  • LocationMaine

I cannot corroborate the egg/larva rumor, but the reason she is not laying is because it is almost winter.


  • Evanthomas89 likes this

If you've enjoyed using my expertise and identifications, please do not create undue ecological risk by releasing your ants. The environment which we keep our pet insects is alien and oftentimes unsanitary, so ensure that wild populations stay safe by giving your ants the best care you can manage for the rest of their lives, as we must do with any other pet.

 

Exotic ants are for those who think that vibrant diversity is something you need to pay money to see. It is illegal to transport live ants across state lines.

 

----

Black lives still matter.


#7 Offline Mettcollsuss - Posted October 22 2017 - 11:07 AM

Mettcollsuss

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,424 posts
  • LocationChicago, IL

I cannot corroborate the egg/larva rumor, but the reason she is not laying is because it is almost winter.

But she stopped laying a few moths ago, long before winter.


  • Evanthomas89 likes this

#8 Offline Mettcollsuss - Posted October 22 2017 - 11:10 AM

Mettcollsuss

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,424 posts
  • LocationChicago, IL

 I'm just worried that the workers might not live long enough to raise the next generation of brood.


Edited by Mettcollsuss, October 22 2017 - 11:15 AM.

  • Evanthomas89 likes this

#9 Offline Batspiderfish - Posted October 22 2017 - 11:12 AM

Batspiderfish

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,614 posts
  • LocationMaine

Because it could take more than a month for those brood to develop, and Formica will not keep any brood before the winter. It was also her very first generation.


  • Evanthomas89 likes this

If you've enjoyed using my expertise and identifications, please do not create undue ecological risk by releasing your ants. The environment which we keep our pet insects is alien and oftentimes unsanitary, so ensure that wild populations stay safe by giving your ants the best care you can manage for the rest of their lives, as we must do with any other pet.

 

Exotic ants are for those who think that vibrant diversity is something you need to pay money to see. It is illegal to transport live ants across state lines.

 

----

Black lives still matter.


#10 Offline Serafine - Posted October 22 2017 - 12:25 PM

Serafine

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,526 posts
  • LocationGermany

Formica workers take 2-3 months to develop and they don't hibernate with brood, it's completely normal for them to stop laying eggs in late summer. I know people who's Camponotus ligniperda colonies stopped developing their brood in early August.


  • Evanthomas89 and Mettcollsuss like this
We should respect all forms of consciousness. The body is just a vessel, a mere hull.

Join the antkeeping discord chat! & reddit - r/antkeeping

Welcome to Lazy Tube - My Camponotus Journal

#11 Offline Batspiderfish - Posted October 22 2017 - 4:54 PM

Batspiderfish

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,614 posts
  • LocationMaine

Ehh, Formica actually develop pretty quickly for me (one month, tops), but of course maturation times depend a lot on average temperature. Foundress queens are even more conservative about that cutoff time, and it's not uncommon at all for captive Formica queens to produce only one worker in their first year.


  • Evanthomas89 likes this

If you've enjoyed using my expertise and identifications, please do not create undue ecological risk by releasing your ants. The environment which we keep our pet insects is alien and oftentimes unsanitary, so ensure that wild populations stay safe by giving your ants the best care you can manage for the rest of their lives, as we must do with any other pet.

 

Exotic ants are for those who think that vibrant diversity is something you need to pay money to see. It is illegal to transport live ants across state lines.

 

----

Black lives still matter.


#12 Offline Evanthomas89 - Posted October 22 2017 - 4:59 PM

Evanthomas89

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 145 posts
  • LocationHowell, NJ

Ehh, Formica actually develop pretty quickly for me (one month, tops), but of course maturation times depend a lot on average temperature. Foundress queens are even more conservative about that cutoff time, and it's not uncommon at all for captive Formica queens to produce only one worker in their first year.

 

That's exactly what mine did, haha. 


Check out my Youtube






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: formica, formica subsericea, f. subsericea, brood, eggs

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users