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Tetramorium mite question

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13 replies to this topic

#1 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted August 23 2017 - 10:10 AM

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Hi!

While snooping around in the backyard tetramorium colonies, I've noticed small, reddish-brown mites running in the tunnels with the ants. I'm pretty sure that these are some sort of myrmecophile scavenger. I've recently considered catching one or two of these to live with my T. sp e colony, which produces lots of waste. Would it be safe for the ants?


Hawaiiant (Ben)

Keeper of
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#2 Offline ultraex2 - Posted August 23 2017 - 10:12 AM

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Just a guess since no pictures, but I'd bet that those are actually ant crickets.  They live in/around colonies of ants and eat scraps.


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#3 Offline AntsMaryland - Posted August 23 2017 - 10:17 AM

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I agree, they are proably mite crickets. Send us a picture for us to make sure. If they are feel free to. I also heard book lice work well as well.


Aphaenogaster cf. rudis 

Tetramorium immigrans 

Tapinoma sessile

Formica subsericea

Pheidole sp.

Camponotus nearcticus


#4 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted August 23 2017 - 5:15 PM

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Ant crickets are larger than the ant mites (I've seen plenty of myrmecophila crickets). Trust me, these are actually mites. I know from experience that myrmecophila crickets have large, noticeable antennae.


Hawaiiant (Ben)

Keeper of
Miniature Labradoodle
Baby Wolf Spider
Mud Dauber wasp larvae
Ochetellus Glaber
Solenopsis Geminata
Brachymyrmex Obscurior
Cardiocondyla Emeryi
Tetramorium Bicarinatum
Plagiolepis Alluaudi
Anoplolepis Gracilipes
Technomyrmex Difficilis
Pheidole Megacephala
Aholehole fish
Cowrie snail
Sea Fan Worm
100+ sea squirts
Tree seedlings
Ghost Crab
Day Gecko
Small Fat Centipede
Endemic Lacewing larva
Vernal Pool shrimps

#5 Offline AntsMaryland - Posted August 23 2017 - 5:18 PM

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Than it's proably a spider-mite


And please send us pictures. That would make our lives SO MUCH easier! :)


Aphaenogaster cf. rudis 

Tetramorium immigrans 

Tapinoma sessile

Formica subsericea

Pheidole sp.

Camponotus nearcticus


#6 Offline MegaMyrmex - Posted August 23 2017 - 5:20 PM

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If they hop like crazy and look like brownish grains of sand with big black legs- crickets
If they look like tiny droplets of hemolymph or amber or resemble minutebticks and seem to attaxh themselves to the ant's joint- trouble.

Proverbs 6:6-8 New International Version (NIV)

Go to the ant, you sluggard;
    consider its ways and be wise!
It has no commander,
    no overseer or ruler,
yet it stores its provisions in summer
    and gathers its food at harvest.

 


#7 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted August 24 2017 - 9:46 AM

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There's three ant mites: the ones that latch onto the ants and suck their blood, the ones that climb onto ants and ride them around, and the ones that eat ants' scraps.


Hawaiiant (Ben)

Keeper of
Miniature Labradoodle
Baby Wolf Spider
Mud Dauber wasp larvae
Ochetellus Glaber
Solenopsis Geminata
Brachymyrmex Obscurior
Cardiocondyla Emeryi
Tetramorium Bicarinatum
Plagiolepis Alluaudi
Anoplolepis Gracilipes
Technomyrmex Difficilis
Pheidole Megacephala
Aholehole fish
Cowrie snail
Sea Fan Worm
100+ sea squirts
Tree seedlings
Ghost Crab
Day Gecko
Small Fat Centipede
Endemic Lacewing larva
Vernal Pool shrimps

#8 Offline AntsMaryland - Posted August 24 2017 - 11:22 AM

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Technically ants do not have blood. They don't have hemoglobins or veins. Their "blood" is actually called hemolymph. Only around 10% is "blood and the rest is plasma. The mites suck more plasma of the ant than anything else. I put this because I feel like that should be clarified.


Aphaenogaster cf. rudis 

Tetramorium immigrans 

Tapinoma sessile

Formica subsericea

Pheidole sp.

Camponotus nearcticus


#9 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted August 24 2017 - 11:36 AM

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I know. I was just making a vampire reference :)


Edited by Connectimyrmex, August 24 2017 - 11:37 AM.

Hawaiiant (Ben)

Keeper of
Miniature Labradoodle
Baby Wolf Spider
Mud Dauber wasp larvae
Ochetellus Glaber
Solenopsis Geminata
Brachymyrmex Obscurior
Cardiocondyla Emeryi
Tetramorium Bicarinatum
Plagiolepis Alluaudi
Anoplolepis Gracilipes
Technomyrmex Difficilis
Pheidole Megacephala
Aholehole fish
Cowrie snail
Sea Fan Worm
100+ sea squirts
Tree seedlings
Ghost Crab
Day Gecko
Small Fat Centipede
Endemic Lacewing larva
Vernal Pool shrimps

#10 Offline AntsMaryland - Posted August 24 2017 - 1:05 PM

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ok


Aphaenogaster cf. rudis 

Tetramorium immigrans 

Tapinoma sessile

Formica subsericea

Pheidole sp.

Camponotus nearcticus


#11 Offline ctantkeeper - Posted August 24 2017 - 6:58 PM

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They may be springtails, since their is a species of brown, myrmecophylic spingtail that lives with them in their nests and feeds upon their garbage / waste.



#12 Offline WeatherAnt - Posted August 24 2017 - 7:06 PM

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I know what you're referring to! They are definitely mites. Absolutely for sure. They're dark red and shiny and I've only ever noticed them casually walking around with the ants. Interestingly, I notice that they travel with the ants when two colonies go to war with one another. I think they're travelling to a new nest for reasons (like new food source, mates, etc).



#13 Offline AntsMaryland - Posted August 25 2017 - 2:40 AM

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it's impossible for us to identify them if you don't send us pictures.


Aphaenogaster cf. rudis 

Tetramorium immigrans 

Tapinoma sessile

Formica subsericea

Pheidole sp.

Camponotus nearcticus


#14 Offline Connectimyrmex - Posted August 25 2017 - 4:10 PM

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They may be springtails, since their is a species of brown, myrmecophylic spingtail that lives with them in their nests and feeds upon their garbage / waste.

I've seen the springtails, they look quite different than the mites. One of them lives in my Tetramorium colony

 

I know what you're referring to! They are definitely mites. Absolutely for sure. They're dark red and shiny and I've only ever noticed them casually walking around with the ants. Interestingly, I notice that they travel with the ants when two colonies go to war with one another. I think they're travelling to a new nest for reasons (like new food source, mates, etc).

That's what they are!

Also, AntsMaryland, my macro lens is still not here yet. PLEASE be patient.


Hawaiiant (Ben)

Keeper of
Miniature Labradoodle
Baby Wolf Spider
Mud Dauber wasp larvae
Ochetellus Glaber
Solenopsis Geminata
Brachymyrmex Obscurior
Cardiocondyla Emeryi
Tetramorium Bicarinatum
Plagiolepis Alluaudi
Anoplolepis Gracilipes
Technomyrmex Difficilis
Pheidole Megacephala
Aholehole fish
Cowrie snail
Sea Fan Worm
100+ sea squirts
Tree seedlings
Ghost Crab
Day Gecko
Small Fat Centipede
Endemic Lacewing larva
Vernal Pool shrimps





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